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Character design changes push SONIC THE HEDGEHOG movie release date to...

The delayed release will give the visual effects team more time to change the look of the titular character.

UNIQLO releases graphic tees collection MARVEL X POLAN designed by Jason...

Take a look at Marvel X Jason Polan's graphic t-shirt collection from UNIQLO.

The Monitor Makes His Arrowverse Debut in First Look Photo

The characters joins the debuting Batwoman and Lois Lane in the latest crossover of The CW's DC superhero series.

Volante Design; The Clothing Company Making Streetwear for Gamers and Nerds

Their unique look isn’t the only reason why Volante pieces sell. They are made to be durable and able to withstand the daily rigors of wear and tear. As Willow herself put it, Volante Design’s goal is to “make practical, wearable clothing that makes you feel badass.

MAD Magazine is getting a Twitch channel, a podcast and many...

In all of DC's new imprint madness, the relaunch of MAD Magazine hasn't gotten quite as many pixels, but under new executive editor Bill Morrison...

EXCLUSIVE: DC Unveils New, Art-Focused Look for Variant Covers

So you've seen one new look for trade dress, now DC is rolling out a new look for their own variant covers, seen here...

Marvel’s Dual-Numbering Trade Dress Spotted on an Ace Comic Con Variant

I know it's crazy, but maybe this isn't horrific but instead attractive and useful.

SDCC ’17: Mark Evanier and Others Discuss What Makes for Good...

The phrase goes, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” I don’t know anyone who follows it. For that reason, an eye-catching cover is...

The week in DC logo fixes – which do YOU prefer?

As we told you on Tuesday, DC Entertainment unveiled a brand new logo for all its branding across all platforms. It's more of a "print" type throwback logo, designed by Pentagram, specifically partner Emily Oberman, just in time to give DC a "rebirth" to its older, more hopeful and optimistic self.

DC gets a new logo just in time for Rebirth

Just as it did with The New 52, DC is ushering in a new logo for its new Rebirth era. The logo, which was...

Who made the Oscars look so great? Designer Henry Hobson

It's not often you come away from an awards show thinking "Man those title cards were amazing!" but that's exactly what I thought while...

Nate Powell and Chris Ross on How They Designed ‘March’

[Editor's note: The release this week of March Book Two by Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell has already made headlines with its story of the fight for civil rights in the 60s, and the covers to both volumes have become iconic in their own right. The message of the courage to fight for equality for all in the face of violent opposition is as relevant and needed today as it was 50 years ago. But powerful images to cover powerful times don't always spring up fully formed. Here Powell and Top Shelf designer Chris Ross with an in-depth breakdown of how they created these covers and combined imagery to capture both history and ideals.] NATE: March was originally a single, massive volume, so the initial front and back covers were intended to house the entire narrative: the front introduced the basic visual theme of opposition, with two elements facing off against each other, though a contingent of riot-ready white supremacist police were prominently featured across the bottom. After some discussion with Chris Ross, Andrew Aydin, and Congressman Lewis, we all agreed that we should shift some of that focus to the folks on the front lines, and away from Jim Crow police forces. Around that time, we decided to release the saga as a trilogy, so Chris and I jumped in to further develop the oppositional themes, but playing with different angles and approaches to the cover’s division.