Super Sons, Catwoman, and Harley Quinn Headline the First Waves of DC Zoom and DC Ink Books

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DC Comics has released full creative team details, release dates, and first looks at the covers for the initial waves of original graphic novels in their new DC Ink and DC Zoom imprints. The imprints, focused on books for pre-teens and young adults, respectively, will feature familiar DC characters reimagined in age-appropriate settings and situations.

The initial wave of DC Zoom books will include the following titles and creators:

  • Super Sons: The Polarshield Project (April 2019)- written by Ridley Pearson and illustrated by Ile Gonzalez
  • DC Super Hero Girls: Spaced Out (May 2019) –written by Shea Fontana, and illustrated by Agnes Garbowska
  • Batman: Overdrive (August 2019)– written by Shea Fontana and illustrated by Marcelo Di Chiara
  • Black Canary: Ignite (October 2019)– written by Meg Cabot and illustrated by Cara McGee

The first wave of young adult DC Ink books will debut around the same time. The following books will be included in that wave:

  • Mera: Tidebreaker (April 2019) – written by Danielle Paige and illustrated by Stephen Byrne
  • Under The Moon: A Catwoman Tale (May 2019)– written by Lauren Myracle and illustrated by Isaac Goodhart
  • Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass (June 2019)– written by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Steve Pugh
  • Teen Titans: Raven (July 2019)– written by Kami Garcia and illustrated by Gabriel Picolo

The lineup for this first wave of books is different from those listed in the original announcement for the imprints, with some books moving forward in the schedule and others – including a second Batman book and a Wonder Woman book by acclaimed YA author Laurie Halse Anderson – apparently having slipped back. A notable addition to the line-up is the Harley Quinn book by Mariko Tamaki, the Eisner- and Caldecott Award-winning writer of This One Summer, and artist Steve Pugh, formerly of The Flintstones.

Check out all of newly-revealed covers, as well as the full official press release, below. The first DC Ink and DC Zoom books will be in stores in April of 2019.

(click images to embiggen)

      

DC ENTERTAINMENT REVEALS ARTISTS, ON SALE DATES, COVERS AND FIRST LOOKS FOR UPCOMING DC ZOOM AND DC INK TITLES

First Wave of Middle Grade and Young Adult Graphic Novels to be illustrated by Acclaimed Artists

Ile Gonzalez, Cara McGee, Stephen Byrne, Gabriel Picolo, Isaac Goodhart, Marcelo Di Chiara and More!

All-Star Authors Ridley Pearson, Meg Cabot, Danielle Paige, Kami Garcia, Lauren Myracle, Mariko Tamaki and Shea Fontana to Share New Details About DC Zoom and DC Ink Titles at ALA Annual 2018

Burbank, Calif., June 11, 2018 – DC Entertainment announced today the inaugural artist lineup for the publisher’s upcoming young reader imprints, DC Zoom and DC Ink. The artists will join the previously announced roster of bestselling young adult and middle grade authors to create diverse, relatable stories starring DC’s most iconic characters such as Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman and many more. Both original graphic novel lines are set to launch in spring 2019.

DC Zoom targets middle grade readers ages 8-12 and will tell stories focused on friends, family and growing up. The line will debut in April 2019 with Super Sons: The Polarshield Project, written by award-winning middle grade author Ridley Pearson and illustrated by Ile Gonzalez. The complete list of creative teams for the first wave of DC Zoom titles include:

  • Super Sons: The Polarshield Project (April 2019)-  written by Ridley Pearson and illustrated by Ile Gonzalez
  • DC Super Hero Girls: Spaced Out (May 2019) written by Shea Fontana, and illustrated by Agnes Garbowska
  • Batman: Overdrive (August 2019) – Written by Shea Fontana and illustrated by Marcelo Di Chiara
  • Black Canary: Ignite (October 2019)– Written by Meg Cabot and illustrated by Cara McGee

DC Ink will publish thought provoking stories for young adults, readers ages 13+, that focus on everyday aspirations, struggles and triumphs. The line will also launch in April 2019 with the highly anticipated Mera coming-of-age tale, Mera: Tidebreaker from New York Times bestselling YA author Danielle Paige and artist Stephen Byrne. Complete creative teams for the first round of DC Ink graphic novels include:

  • Mera: Tidebreaker (April 2019) – written by Danielle Paige and illustrated by Stephen Byrne
  • Under The Moon: A Catwoman Tale (May 2019) – written by Lauren Myracle and illustrated by Isaac Goodhart
  • Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass (June 2019) – written by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Steve Pugh
  • Teen Titans: Raven (July 2019) – written by Kami Garcia and illustrated by Gabriel Picolo

The covers and first looks for the first wave of DC Zoom and DC Ink titles are illustrated by each respective artist announced today and can be viewed in the image gallery above.

DC Zoom and DC Ink authors Kami Garcia, Ridley Pearson, Shea Fontana, Meg Cabot, Danielle Paige, Lauren Myracle and Mariko Tamaki will share more details about their upcoming books on various panels at this year’s American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans from June 21-26.

About DC Entertainment

DC Entertainment, home to iconic brands DC (Superman, Batman, Green Lantern, Wonder Woman, The Flash, etc.), DC Vertigo (Sandman, Fables, etc.) and MAD, is the creative division charged with strategically integrating across Warner Bros. and Time Warner. DC Entertainment works in concert with many key Warner Bros. divisions to unleash its stories and characters across all media, including but not limited to film, television, consumer products, home entertainment, and interactive games. Publishing thousands of comic books, graphic novels and magazines each year, DC Entertainment is one of the largest English-language publishers of comics in the world.

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3 COMMENTS

  1. I hope these lines do well. As a former member of Friends of Lulu, I’m glad to see that publishers continue to try to gear content directly towards younger readers and younger female readers, especially, so I hope this rebranding works to get more young women into comics. (Although at this point, that isn’t really a problem, although Marvel is clearly doing better at it due to the better movies.)

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