Things about Denys Cowan: Dewars, Static, Shaft

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I totally stole this from artist/producer Denys Cowan’s FB page, but it’s an interesting little sidenote, Back in the 90s people still read magazines, and liquor companies would purchase full page advertisements in these magazines. Man, history is SO WEIRD, right? Anyway, Dewars scotch ran a series of profiles of debonair achievers attempting to convince you that if you drank their scotch you would also be a debonair achiever. Cowan, then well known for his Batman and Question comics and about to co-found Milestone Media, was a fitting choice but it did seem like a win for comics at the time. This predated the Rob Liefeld Levis commercial, but both are a reminder that cartoonists as media figures is far from a recent phenomenon.

Which reminds me that I forgot to mention that Static Shock is getting a live action series as part of Warner’s Blue Ribbon digital division, with Reginald Hudlin producing. Static was created for Milestone by the late Dwayne McDuffie, the late Robert Washington III and John Paul Leon, but Cowan produced the previous Static Shock animated series. He’s a sturdy character and it’s good to see him getting a reboot.

As long as we’re making this The Denys Cowan Post, here’s a cover to Shaft #2 that Bill Sienkiewicz finished over Cowan’s pencils.
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Marvel spotlights Superheroes as Cats

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Yesterday was National Cat Day and Marvel celebrated by showing casing these covers by Jenny Park, who specializing in painting famous pop culture characters as cats. How she isn’t a billionaire I don’t know.

Could this possibly be another variant month theme for Marvel? Makes sense doesn’t it.

National Cat DAy was celebrated pretty quietly here at Stately Beat Manor, except by Charlie who overdid it a little and yakked all over the litter mat. And THAT is truly why we celebrate National Cat Day.

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Nice Art: All the new and kids titles from Boom! Studios in January

We haven’t done a ton of solicitation listings at the Beat recently, but it’s something we’re going to start up again, because…well, look at all the nice art. Here are the #1s and the Kaboom and Boombox titles from Boom’s January solicitations—new creator owned titles include Feathers, a smart looking new kids title, and Burning Fields, a caper with a burning Iraqi oil field as the setting.

Also here are all the KaBOOM titles for January with as many variant covers as have been released by some funky fresh artists like Ian McGinty, Lorena Gomez and Christine Larsen.

Finally, it’s Boom!’s 10th anniversary in 2015, represented here by PLACEHOLDER cover graphics, and while I’ll never forget wondering why Ross Richie was crazy enough to get into the pamphlet business, I think we’re all glad he had a plan and stuck with it.

Not included here, licensed titles, Archaia and graphic novels.

BOOM! STUDIOS ITEMS
SHIPPING IN JANUARY 2015
(NOVEMBER ISSUE OF ‘PREVIEWS’)
(Please note: All covers designated as a “10 Years Cover” below will be revealed at a later date.)NEW LAUNCHING SINGLES
BOOM! STUDIOS
BURNING FIELDS #1 (of 8)
Retail Price: $3.99
Authors: Michael Moreci & Tim Daniel
Artist: Colin Lorimer
Cover Artists:  A: Colin Lorimer B: Trevor Hairsine (10 Years Cover) (INCENTIVE) C:Riley Rossmo (INCENTIVE)
WHY WE LOVE IT: After the critical acclaim of Curse, we couldn’t wait to work with Michael Moreci, Tim Daniel, Colin Lorimer, and Riley Rossmo again—and just as they reinvented the werewolf tale, their modern take on military horror got under our skin.
WHY YOU’LL LOVE IT: The team that brought you one of the best-reviewed comics of 2014 returns in 2015 to create a new horror tale unlike any other. A geopolitical drama with monster mythos, Burning Fields is a story for both fans of Zero Dark Thirty and The Thing, as the writers of Roche Limit and Enormous explore the evil that lurks when greed drives one to drill too deep into the unknown.
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Dana Atkinson, a dishonorably discharged army investigator, is pulled back to the Middle East when a group of American oil technicians disappear under bizarre circumstances. With the help of an Iraqi investigator, what Dana discovers is unimaginable: A series of unusual incidents at the drill site lead her and her unlikely ally to discover a mythic evil that has been released, one that threatens both the lives of the entire region and the fragile peace that exists
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Burning Fields #1 Main Cover A by Colin Lorimer
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Burning Fields #1 Retailer Incentive Cover B (1:10) by Trevor Hairsine
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Burning Fields #1 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:20) by Riley Rossmo
NEW LAUNCHING SINGLE

KABOOM! STUDIOS

ADVENTURE TIME: MARCELINE GONE ADRIFT #1 (of 6)
Retail Price: $3.99
Author: Meredith Gran
Artist: Carey Pietsch
Cover Artists: A: Reimena Yee B: Mychal Amann (Subscription Cover) C: Joe Quinones (10 Years Cover) (INCENTIVE) D: Britt Wilson (INCENTIVE)
WHY WE LOVE IT: Marceline and the Scream Queens was our first Adventure Time miniseries and we loved the tour Meredith Gran took us on. It’s definitely time for more Marceline and what better way to get everything rolling than with an epic that takes Marceline and Princess Bubblegum to the far corners of the world and into space!
WHY YOU’LL LOVE IT: Marceline. The. Vampire. Queen. From the writer that brought you Marceline and the Scream Queens, Meredith Gran (Octopus Pie), and introducing indie talent Carey Pietsch, this is your chance to get some one-on-one time with one of your favorite residents of Ooo.
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Marceline is on a rampage for mysterious reasons, and the kingdom of Ooo is desperately scrambling to stop her. In trying to save both Ooo and Marceline herself, Princess Bubblegum accidentally propels Marceline into the farthest reaches of space…and strips her of her powers! Guilt-ridden, Princess Bubblegum sets off on a space rescue that’ll test the power of her mind…as well as the power of friendship.

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Adventure Time: Marceline Gone Adrift #1 Main Cover A by Reimena Yee
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Adventure Time: Marceline Gone Adrift #1 Subscription Cover B by Mychal Amann
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Adventure Time: Marceline Gone Adrift #1 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:10)
by Joe Quinones
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Adventure Time: Marceline Gone Adrift #1 Retailer Incentive Cover D (1:20) by Britt Wilson

NEW LAUNCHING SINGLE
BOOM! BOX

MUNCHKIN #1
Retail Price: $3.99
Authors:  Tom Siddell, Jim Zub & John Kovalic
Artists: Mike Holmes, Rian Sygh, & John Kovalic
Cover Artists: A: Ian McGinty 99% B: Evan Palmer 1% C. Shelli Paroline & Braden Lamb (10 Years Cover) (INCENTIVE) D. John Kovalic (INCENTIVE)
WHY WE LOVE IT: As long-time fans of the game, we’re jazzed to weave stories out of the world of Munchkin, whether it’s from the perspective of one Munchkin, a gang of them, or even one of the monsters that live behind the doors!
WHY YOU’LL LOVE IT: Kick open the door. Kill the monster. Steal the treasure. Screw over everybody you come in contact with. Welcome to the world of Munchkin, a gathering of stories based on the popular game series. It’s a laugh a minute, pal. Plus, every first printing of every issue will ship with an exclusive card for the game.
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Based on the immensely popular card game, Munchkin comes to comics! Munchkin takes place in a very flexible mashup of genres. Originally a satire of fantasy roleplaying, it has since then taken on non-fantasy and non-gaming elements. Characters in Munchkin change constantly but never permanently. What do Munchkins do? They play for the win. They are rules lawyers. They backstab. They gloat. They whine when someone else backstabs or gloats. Munchkins are emotional. Munchkins may be clever, but they are never wise. Munchkins have short attention spans. Munchkins may be brave in the face of awful odds, but they are even braver when beating up crippled goblins for their lunch money. If a Munchkin seems to show mercy, it’s because he was bored or distracted. After all, even stomping an ant helps you level up.

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Munchkin #1 Main Cover A by Ian McGinty
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Munchkin #1 Chase Cover B (1:99) by Evan Palmer
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Munchkin #1 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:10) by Shelli Paroline & Braden Lamb
Munchkin #1 Cover D by John Kovalic
Munchkin #1 Retailer Incentive Cover D (1:20) by John Kovalic
NEW LAUNCHING SINGLE
ARCHAIA
 

FEATHERS #1 (of 6)
Retail Price: $3.99
Author: Jorge Corona
Artist: Jorge Corona
Cover Artists: A: Jorge Corona B: Ramón K. Pérez (10 Years Cover) (INCENTIVE) C:Ken Niimura (INCENTIVE)
WHY WE LOVE IT: In the footsteps of Archaia titles like Rust, Iron, Will o’ the Wisp, andThe Reason for Dragons, debut writer-artist Jorge Corona (Goners) brings a brand-new voice to the comics industry with Feathers. With our passion for working with fresh talent, we could not be happier to introduce his work to a wider audience.
WHY YOU’LL LOVE IT: There’s never been a better time for fantastic, all-ages comics that embrace both the darkness and beauty in life. Fans of Avatar: Legend of Korra, Mike Mignola, and Amulet will fall in love with Poe, the boy covered in feathers.
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: A recluse boy born covered in feathers must help his first-ever friend, a young girl named Bianca, as she tries to return to her home beyond the slums of the Maze. They must dodge street gangs and child-snatchers along the way, and perhaps together will learn the secrets to his mysterious past.ARCHAIA_Feathers_001_A
Feathers #1 Main Cover A by Jorge Corona
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Feathers #1 Retailer Incentive Cover B (1:10) by Ramón K. Pérez
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Feathers #1 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:20) by Ken Niimura

KABOOM! STUDIOS

ABIGAIL AND THE SNOWMAN #2 (of 4)
Retail Price: $3.99
Author: Roger Langridge
Artist: Roger Langridge
Cover Artist: Roger Langridge
It didn’t take long for Abigail to warm up to the idea of having a Yeti as a best friend, but no matter how much fun the two friends have together, they can’t avoid the mysterious men in town up to no good and in search of the Abominable Snowman.KABOOM_Abigail_and_the_Snowman_002

Abigail and the Snowman #2 Cover by Roger Langridge
CAPTURE CREATURES #3
Retail Price: $3.99
Authors: Frank Gibson & Becky Dreistadt
Artist: Becky Dreistadt
Cover Artists: A: Becky Dreistadt 90% B: Lorena Gomez 10% C: Maryanna Hoggatt (INCENTIVE) D: Maggie Rudy (INCENTIVE)
The mystery is only getting stronger but as our heroes are about to learn, maybe it’s not their job to save the critters…the critters just might be here to save them. It’s going to be a super fun ride as these creatures turn up the heat…literally.KABOOM_Capture_Creatures_003_A
Capture Creatures #3 Main Cover A by Becky Dreistadt
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Capture Creatures #3 Chase Cover B (1:10) by Lorena Gomez
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Capture Creatures #3 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:15) by Maryanna Hoggatt
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Capture Creatures #3 Retailer Incentive Cover D (1:25) by Maggie Rudy
UNCLE GRANDPA #4
Retail Price: $3.99
Authors: Yehudi Mercado, David Degrand, Pranas Naujokaitis, Nichol Ashworth, & Various
Artists: Yehudi Mercado, David Degrand, Pranas Naujokaitis, Nichol Ashworth, & Various
Cover Artists: A. Zé Burnay 90% B. Cory Fuller 10% C. Christine Larsen (INCENTIVE)
It’s time for a new issue of Uncle Grandpa, starring me, Pizza Steve! Uncle G may be the Uncle and Grandpa to everyone ever, but he has a lot to learn if he ever wants to be the coolest slice of pizza to ever put on a pair of sunglasses and pull off the most wicked pranks.KABOOM_Uncle_Grandpa_004_A
Uncle Grandpa #4 Main Cover A by Zé Burnay
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Uncle Grandpa #4 Chase Cover B (1:10) by Cory Fuller
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Uncle Grandpa #4 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:20) by Christine Larsen
STEVEN UNIVERSE #6
Retail Price: $3.99
Author: Jeremy Sorese & Various
Artist: Coleman Engle & Various
Cover Artists: A. Tait Howard 90%  B. Meg Gandy 10% C. Helen Yoon (INCENTIVE)
Connie and Stephen might have finally found a way to save the library, .but how much is it going to cost the Gems? It’s an actual race against time to keep books for everyone. Hopefully people will still be there to read them when it’s all over.KABOOM_Steven_Universe_006_A
Steven Universe #6 Main Cover A by Tait Howard
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Steven Universe #6 Chase Cover B (1:10) by Meg Gandy
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Steven Universe #6 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:20) by Helen Yoon
THE AMAZING WORLD OF GUMBALL #8
Retail Price: $3.99
Author: Frank Gibson
Artist: Tyson Hesse
Cover Artists: A. Missy Pena  B. Zachary Giallongo (Subscription Cover)  C. TBD (INCENTIVE)
Anais is tired of her brothers always getting in trouble and has finally devised a plan so that she can have a quiet weekend with no issues. She definitely underestimated Gumball’s abilty to make every day…special.KABOOM_Amazing_World_of_Gumball_008_A
The Amazing World of Gumball #8 Main Cover A by Missy Pena
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The Amazing World of Gumball #8 Subscription Cover B by Zachary Giallongo
REGULAR SHOW #19
Retail Price: $3.99
Author: Nick Sumida
Artist: Allison Strejlau
Cover Artists: A: Andy Hirsch  B: Andy Kluthe (Subscription Cover) C: Natalie Andrewson (INCENTIVE)
Rigby and Mordecai’s wishes keep spiraling out of control, but a trip to Genie Beach might offer a solution! Or, um, it might make everything way, way worse.KABOOM_Regular_Show_019_A
Regular Show #19 Main Cover A by Andy Hirsch
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Regular Show #19 Subscription Cover B by Andy Kluthe
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Regular Show #19 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:20) by Natalie Andrewson
BRAVEST WARRIORS #28
Retail Price: $3.99
Author: Kate Leth
Artist: Ian McGinty
Cover Artists:  A: Ian McGinty 50% B: Priscilla Wong 50% C: Rachael Hunt (INCENTIVE)
It’s the epic conclusion to the Bravest Warriors’ battle to save the planet Vira alongside all-new, super-rad ally, Peach. Giant monsters versus giant robots, Bravest Warriors style!KABOOM_Bravest_Warriors_028_A
Bravest Warriors #28 Cover A by Ian McGinty
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Bravest Warriors #28 Chase Cover B (1:2) by Priscilla Wong
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Bravest Warriors #28 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:15) by Rachael Hunt
GARFIELD #33: HIS 9 LIVES, PART 1 (of 4)
Retail Price: $3.99
Authors: Scott Nickel
Artists: Andy Hirsch, David DeGrand & Kari Smith
Cover Artists: A: Andy Hirsch B: Kari Smith (INCENTIVE)
WHY WE LOVE IT: In 1984, Jim Davis created a groundbreaking series of illustrated short stories called Garfield: His 9 Lives, setting the Fat Cat in various eras, that became an instant classic. We loved it so much we wanted to do it again!
WHY YOU’LL LOVE IT: Even if you’ve never read the original His 9 Lives stories or watched the 1988 animated special, you’ll enjoy these unique interpretations by an all-star cast of cartoonists, including Andy Hirsch, David DeGrand, Roger Langridge, Frazer Irving, and Genevieve FT, as they depict Garfield through the ages, from prehistoric times, to the reaches of outer space.
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: “Garfield: His 9 Lives, Part 1.” The journey begins with “Cave Cat,” as David DeGrand takes us back to Garfield’s first life, during the earliest days of life on Earth! Then, Kari Smith illustrates “King Cat,” as we see how Garfield got down in Ancient Egypt.KABOOM_Garfield_033_A
Garfield #33 Main Cover A by Andy Hirsch
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Garfield #33 Retailer Incentive Cover B (1:10) by Kari Smith
ADVENTURE TIME #36
Retail Price: $3.99
Author: Chris Hastings
Artist: Zachary Sterling
Cover Artists: A: Justin Hillgrove B: Ale Giorini (Subscription Cover) C: Rebekka Dunlap (INCENTIVE)
It’s the first Adventure Time starring its new creative team! With indie all-star Chris Hastings writing and the amazingly talented Zachary Sterling on art, these mathematical adventures are only going to get more algebraic!KABOOM_Adventure_Time_036_A
Adventure Time #36 Main Cover A by Justin Hillgrove
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Adventure Time #36 Subscription Cover B by Ale Giorini
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Adventure Time #36 Retailer Incentive Cover C (1:20) by Rebekka Dunlap
ONGOINGS AND LIMITED SERIES
BOOM! BOX
TEEN DOG #5 (of 8)
Retail Price: $3.99
Author: Jake Lawrence
Artist: Jake Lawrence
Cover Artist: Jake Lawrence
Do you hear that? Do you hear those sweet summer jamz? The sound of sneaking into a venue to see your favorite band? The echos of the needle first hitting a new record? Teen Dog gets groovy in this musical issue, even if he can’t even really play the guitar.BOOMBOX_Teen_Dog_005

Teen Dog #5 Cover by Jake Lawrence
LUMBERJANES #10
Retail Price: $3.99
Authors: Noelle Stevenson & Shannon Watters
Artist: Carolyn Nowak
Cover Artists: A. Carolyn Nowak B. Kat Leyh (INCENTIVE)
It’s a free day at Lumberjanes camp, and the Roanoke cabin is…bored out of their skulls. With nothing to fight the girls set themselves to earning all the badges they can that don’t involve monsters or the supernatural, which is surprisingly hard! When Mal and Molly sneak off in search of real adventure (that won’t put them to sleep!), they accidentally stumble into something more than they ever bargained for…BOOMBOX_Lumberjanes_010_A
Lumberjanes #10 Main Cover A by Carolyn Nowak
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Lumberjanes #10 Retailer Incentive Cover B (1:20) by Kat Leyh

Buy a copy of The Walking Dead Vol. 1 with an original oil painting by Ben Templesmith for an absurdly low price

Well, $412 seems absurdly low to us, anyway. 

Renowned horror/fantasy artist Templesmith has been experimenting with hand-painted covers for several books, and this is an original one of a kind oil painting done on a copy of The Walking Dead Volume 1. The painting was varnished, and I don’t know if you can read the book inside, but it seems to me that this is a pretty darned sweet collectible…especially for Halloween.

Also…Christmas is coming.

More Templesmith stuff at the 78Squid retail website.

31 Days of Halloween: Under the Apple Tree by Sarah Winifred Searle

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Want to read a 96 graphic novel about a young woman and a time travelling ghost for FREE? You can read about the making of the book at the  Under the Apple Tree webpage and download it here.  Cartoonist Sarah Winifred Searle created it as part of a Children’s Writer-in-Residence at the Boston Public Library. here’s the logline:

When sixteen year old Rosie and her mother leave the Boston suburbs and move to a little tourist town in Maine, she is understandably upset. Unfortunately for her, rural life turns out to be more exciting than expected. A bit too exciting, actually.

Rosie must deal with a fate forced upon her by events nearly a century past: she needs to solve the mystery behind the Civil War era soldier who haunts her new home. “Discover the truth,” he pleads, “so I may rest.” Plagued by strange dreams, she digs into the past and discovers secrets about the town. Her mission hits obstacles, however, as she struggles to make friends, find independence, and make it to graduation.

A little mystery, a little magic, a little New England…yep, Halloween is on its way.

 

31 Days of Halloween: Menton3 and 44Flood

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Fall is in the air, bringing a crisp step and the crunch of leaves under foot, and the inevitable—perhaps inescapable—presence of Pumpkin Spice everything all around us! Yes, it’s time for 31 Days of Halloween, The Beat’s annual tribute to our MOST FAVORITEST TIME OF YEAR. And let’s get things going with probably the most obvious link possible…but I have ever written about painter/cartoonist/musician Menton3 on The Beat before so here goes!

Based in Chicago, Menton3—aka Menton J Matthews III—is a painter of atmospheric and disturbing images. While you can find a lot of his work at his website, he’s probably best known these days as a partner in 44Flood, a publishing company that has teamed with IDW to put out art books and comics. Along with fellow artists Kasra Ghanbari, Ben Templesmith and Nick Idell, 44Flood has put out Tome, an artbook which was mostly Kickstarted, Templesmith’s The Squidder, the comic Monocyte, which you see on this page, and Libretto, an anthology of eerieness centering on vampirism. A new volume of Tome is on its way or already here (I couldn’t find a lot of solid news about the bunch.)

Collectively they also do a thing called Monster Mondays, available on the 44Flood webstore, but I’m warning once you start poking around there you’re gonna want to buy something from Menton, Templesmith, Jonathan Wayshack or any number of talented spooky colleagues.

Yep, Halloween is on its way.

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Joe Quesada’s Star Wars #1 cover variant revealed

star-wars-1-joe-quesada-cover-1024x791.jpg StarWars.com
has unveiled Joe Quesada’s variant cover to Star Wars
#1. The first Marvel issue of the 21st century will debut in
January with story by Jason Aaron, and art by John Cassaday and
Laura Martin. Marrtin colored Quesada’s cover. Marvel’s CCO
wrote:

I was asked to give a quote
about this cover and to tell fans about the first time I saw Star
Wars or how it completely changed my life, but it’s a story I’m
sure isn’t all that interesting when compared to the countless
others that have been told, much more eloquently, by so many before
me,” said Quesada. “While each of us has had our unique moments of
discovery and love affair with the property there’s nothing that I
think I could say or add that hasn’t been said before and
truthfully it really isn’t all that important because It’s that
love for Star Wars that binds all of us who share those unique
moments like the Force itself. That’s why when I was offered the
opportunity to do this cover I was both thrilled beyond belief and
as nervous as I was when I did my very first professional work over
twenty years ago. To have the opportunity to illustrate the classic
cast members in one piece has been by far one of the highlights of
my career as an artist. I can only hope that it turned out okay and
that maybe, just maybe, I get the chance to do it again
someday.

I like it, but no
Jaxxon?

Revealed! Here are your sexualized male superheroes

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Okay, unless the unforeseen happens I swear this is the LAST Beat post about Spider-Woman’s butt. But One of the bingo card arguments trotted out every time there is a kerfuffle of this nature is that “Oh but the men in comics are sexualized too!” which is so not true. I’ve written this a billion times, but “The Peter Parker Paradox” states that “Women are sexualized; men are idealized” in superhero comics.

Except when men ARE sexualized, as in this tumblr set: So come on, reasonable people of the internet, can you see the difference here?

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What Nerve! open at RISD with awesome catalog

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RISD (The Rhode Island School of Art and Design) is hosting an art show—now open and running until January 9, 2015—“What Nerve!” and it spotlights alternative artists, several of them with one foot in cartooning:

What Nerve! Alternative Figures in American Art, 1960 to the Present proposes an alternate history of figurative painting, sculpture, and vernacular image-making from 1960 to the present that has been largely overlooked and undervalued. At the heart of What Nerve! are four mini-exhibitions based on crucial shows, spaces, and groups in Chicago (the Hairy Who), San Francisco (Funk), Ann Arbor (Destroy All Monsters), and Providence (Forcefield)—places outside the artistic focal point of New York. These moments are linked together by six influential or intersecting artists: H. C. Westermann, Jack Kirby, William Copley, Christina Ramberg, Gary Panter, and Elizabeth Murray.

All of these artists ran against the modernist grain and its emphasis on theory. Rather than distancing their art through irony or institutional critique, the artists in What Nerve! seized imagery and ideas from vernacular sources as diverse as comics and pottery, pulling and reshaping material from their environments to tackle a variety of subjects with equal doses of satire and sincerity. What Nerve! looks at their distinctive idioms, shown in works that are often earnest, sometimes narrative, frequently transgressive, and always individualistic.


The show is curated by Dan Nadel, who has been spending his time profitably since PictureBox folded.

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Nadel has also put together the catalog for the show, What Nerve! , which spotlights all of the above with essays by Nicole Rudick, Roger Brown and more. I WANT THIS BOOK.

The RISD exhibit will have some events as well:

Design the Night opening celebration
Thursday, September 18, 2014 | 5-9 pm | free 

Critical Encounters with Body, Place, and Time
Friday, September 19, 2014 | 1-4 pm | free
Gallery conversations with artists, curators, and art historians explore key issues emerging from What Nerve! 

Screenings: Hairy Who & The Chicago Imagists
Sundays, September 21 and October 12, 2014 | 2-4 pm | free

Art top: Karl Wirsum’s “Show Girl I” (1969)

Marvel’s Brevoort responds to Manara controversy

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I said I was going to be happy and puppies today, but I feel I should note that Marvel’s executive editor Tom Brevoort responded to the whole Milo Manara thing on his formspring:

Q: Mr. Brevoort, what is your opinion on the debate over M. Manara’s variant cover of Spider Woman? A similar quarrel happened few months back for one cover on DC’s Teen Titans #1. Personally, I agree that women in comics are often “over-sexualized”. However, I am wondering whether this criticism is going too far. It is sort of becoming more like a form of conservatism. It almost seems like some people want to completely remove sexual thematics from comics.

[snip] A:

I think that the people who are upset about that cover have a point, at least in how the image relates to them.

By that same token, Milo Manara has been working as a cartoonist since 1969, and what he does hasn’t materially changed in all that time. So when we say “Manara cover”, his body of work indicates what sort of thing he’s going to do.

It’s also, for a Manara piece, one of the less sexualized ones, at least to my eye. Maybe others feel differently. But given that the character is covered head-to-toe, and is crouched in a spider-like pose, it seems far less exploitative to me than other Manara pieces we’ve run in previous months and years.

But all that said, it’s the right of every reader not to like something.

And fortunately, it’s a variant cover, so people will likely need to seek it out if they want it, rather than it being the display piece for the book.

I think a conversation about how women are depicted in comics is relevant at this point, and definitely seems to be bubbling up from the zeitgeist. That too is fine. Nothing gets better unless ideas are communicated.


Ya hear that internet? NOTHING GETS BETTER UNLESS IDEAS ARE COMMUNICATED. As in IT’S OKAY TO TALK ABOUT THIS. Drops mic.

Separated at birth: Spider-Man and Spider-Woman?

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In commenting on his FB page on how drawing a sexy cover got attention at EW.com, artist J. Scott Campbell posted this classic Spider-Man cover, strongly reminiscent of the Milo Manara cover that everyone is STILL talking about.

It is true that the butt-in-the-air arachnid is a classic pose…

…but it is equally untrue that the covers are equivalent. Unless J. Scott Campbell has a forty year career drawing sexy men and is well known for his gay erotica…

Reading the EW comments, the false equivalency of the objectification of men and women in comics is brought up once again. As it is every five minutes. Obviously Spidey has always had a nice butt. But the men in comics are drawn HEROICALLY not sexually.

Can you see the difference?

Has this canard—which is brought up any time the over sexualization of women in comics is discussed—been given a name yet? The False Sexualization Fallacy? The Peter Parker Paradox? Wilma?

Any ideas?

[Thanks to Beat Spy Desert Storm for the link.]

Nice Art: AlphaBands by Ben Towle

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Cartoonist/comics educator Ben Towle likes to take up half the year in alphabet themed art projects; once it was monsters then animals. This time he drew 26 different musicians in a project called AlphaBands. All 26 are up now, he explains and though not everyone was a hit single, it was also a technical exercise.

Also as usual, though, I used this exercise not just as an excuse to draw regularly, but also to learn some new tools. All of these were drawn and colored in Digital Manga Studio on my Surface Pro 2. I also started investigating some of Ray Frenden’s custom Manga Studio brushes. The CCR illustration, for example, was colored with his watercolor wash brushes and you can see some of his dry media brushes creating charcoal-like effects in some of the later drawings. If you want to try some of these brushes out for yourself, you can buy them from his shop here. They’re well worth picking up.

 

Nice Art: Roman Muradov’s (In A Sense) Lost and Found

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Let’s end this week with some art! No publisher puts out more consistently beautiful books than Nobrow, and "(In a Sense) Lost and Found&quot by Roman Muradov is no exception. Muradov is best known for his illustrations in the New Yorker, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal; although he’s been in mini comics and anthologies before this is his first graphic novel.

Like all Nobrow books, Muradov’s debut is graphically sharp, with block of bold flat color giving shape to his delicate drawings; a kids book style all grown up. The story is a fable involving innocence as a tangible object, sending the hero on an ephemeral quest — it’s the kind of imaginary yet evocative tale that comics are great at capturing.

(In a Sense) Lost and Found goes on sale September 9.

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By Its Cover Special: Image Expo 2014

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This will be the last By Its Cover for a few months, so I thought I’d do something special. Today we’re going to look at the Image Expo teaser images shown at SDCC 2014.

To be clear, these aren’t necessarily covers. In theory, they’re teaser images intended to get people interested in each series, though half of the teasers look like they just used the first issue’s cover art.

When Torsten Adair suggested the topic, I was initially hesitant. I made a conscious decision to focus on the best covers each week – partly in hopes of inspiring people to create more visually diverse covers – but these Image Expo images range from great to distinctly not-great. Though it’s possible for us to learn just as much (or more) from seeing people’s failures as their successes.

I guess what I’m trying to say is that I almost feel like the column you are about to read needs a warning. I was going easy on the covers before; we’re about to go critical.

Methodology: I purposely avoided reading the descriptions of each book until after I’d looked at the corresponding teaser image. I then showed the images to a couple of friends who also knew nothing about the books, to see if their impressions differed. What follows are the results.


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I’ve decided to go through these in reverse order from how the books were announced, because I wanted to start off with an example of perfection. Sleek and stylish, this teaser doesn’t say much, but in a tantalizing way that makes me want to know more.

The way the syringe icon doubles as a pill is perfect. The texture inside the icon wasn’t really necessary, but it works regardless. Futura is one of those sturdy, timeless fonts that’s ridiculously overused, yet never gets old. And like any proper teaser, it tells me the month and year it’s coming out.

That said, based on my own experience, I’m betting there are a lot of non-designers out there who consider this image boring. But I’m not sure that can be helped.

 

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Tooth & Clawl? Tooth &…Crawl? Crawl? Clawl?

It took me two minutes looking over this image before I realized it said “Tooth & Claw 1.” I can understand putting the “1” in there so that the ampersand is centered (and it’s a great ampersand, by the way), but the number’s similarity to the lowercase “l” hurts the title’s readability. Plus, what do you do with Tooth & Claw 2 and beyond? Since all other numbers are wider than “1,” the ampersand will either no longer be centered, or the title is going to look cramped.

Also, the lowercase “l” looks weird with the upper serif coming off the wrong side like that.

But the title treatment isn’t the only problem. My friends and I all found this cover to be visually boring, and I couldn’t figure out why. I’m a fan of Busiek’s writing, so I want to like this. The image is well drawn and well composed. I dig symmetrical compositions. And it’s an image of a warthog doing magic! So why does it make me want to scroll away quickly to something more visually pleasant?

The problem is the colors. Instead of being used to create depth, they’re flattening the image out. The old staple of warm-and-cold contrast is being used for the background, but the gradient meets in the center as a dull gray. The blue orb sits in the cold area of the gradient, where there is the least contrast, and likewise all the brownish red elements sit in the warm area of the gradient.

The warthog, who should be the focus of the piece, is colored entirely in very desaturated colors that push the focus to the less gray background elements. Even the glowing light in the character’s hands is gray, instead of a vibrant white. The glowing objects around the character are separated from the light blue background with a strange warm gray glow that flattens them out, making it look like the character is sitting (well, floating) in front of a painted wall instead of summoning light. From a distance, the image balances out to dull gray and brown.

A better approach? Glowing objects are hard to convey against light backgrounds. A lightsaber doesn’t look as good in front of a white or pastel wall as it does behind dark colors. If the warthog was floating in front of a black background, everything lit only by the green objects emanating from the character’s hands, that would be one dramatic image.

(Yes, I realize Jordie Bellaire just won an Eisner for Best Coloring. Feel free to tell me I’m wrong.)

 

10

Whoa, look at that title logo. That’s crazy. I never would’ve attempted something so wild and chaotic, and that’s why I love it.

I also love the expressiveness of the painting, and the color palette is solid. I don’t quite get the light blue circle (sun? moon? something else?) that’s overlapping his face, but since they’ve already consciously broken all the rules with the rest of the composition, I feel like I should just go with it.

My first guess as to the story was “a western set in space?,” and the description pretty much confirmed it, so it’s a success there too. All it’s missing as far as teasers go is a date. It doesn’t count if you hid it in those seemingly random dots, guys.

 

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The image of the kid behind the moon works really well when I’ve seen it cropped down on other sites, but otherwise the composition is a little awkward. I kind of want the kid’s eye line to be pointing to the title and credits, rather than just under them and over to whatever is to the right of the image.

There are a few different approaches that I think might work a little better. I don’t think the typeface used for the title works very well spaced out like that. A taller typeface would probably work better, like the one used for the creator’s names. But there’s so much space for a title at the top of the image, you could go even taller.

Or, the image could be cropped in so that the moon is centered horizontally, and the title and creator names could be centered within the moon. Or, the image could be cropped in so that part of the left side of the moon is cut off (the kid being places on the left side of the rule of thirds), and the title and creator names placed small in the upper right corner (not overlapping the moon).

I’m not sure if I’m making sense, so here are examples.

 

08

Am I the only one who hadn’t heard of the constellation the Southern Cross? Maybe that just shows how ignorant I am of astronomy, I don’t know. I initially thought the dots in the “O” were an attempt at making it look like a moon, until I saw the symbol in the Image logo, and still didn’t realize it was a constellation. Make fun of me if you want.

So my first thought looking at this teaser is that the story takes place in the south, and is about some sort of angel or winged main character who is transporting a ghostly corpse a la Hellboy. After I was informed about the constellation, I still figured it was the same story, only set in the southern hemisphere.

The story description tells me I couldn’t be more wrong. It doesn’t even take place on earth! It’s about a tanker flight heading to Titan called the Southern Cross, and what I took to be wings are probably the frame around a window. The corpse might be hitching a ride, as I thought before, or it might be trying to strangle the character.

It’s well drawn, but isn’t quite getting across the concept. It’s described as “The Shining on a haunted spaceship,” but I got neither a spaceship nor The Shining from this. The look of internal peace and calmness on the character’s face does not convey a horror vibe.

In terms of type, it’s kind of distracting to me how “SOUTHERN” is in very clean Futura, while “CROSS” is in Futura that’s been roughed up to look hand-drawn. They should either both look hand-drawn, or both look clean. Or maybe the hand-drawn word should look more hand-written (instead of a roughed up geometric font), but it might be tougher to get that to work. I also kind of want to see the Image logo moved up below the logo and resized to the same height as the “01,” to balance out the top half of the image.

 

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A collage like this could’ve completely fallen apart, but I think it works. I immediately get that this is two locations combined into a single image, rather than two people finding a cave filled with ships flying away from a tiny planet. I think the ships flying overhead behind them helps a great deal in terms of that.

The only thing I’m not sure of is the stream. Is it lava? It looks like they’re standing in it, so I assume not. Is it just water colored red because artistic license? It’s the one element that isn’t really working for me, because I don’t really like how it flows behind the ships.

 

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It’s not an elegant cover, but it does a perfect job of getting across the concept, assuming that concept is “Planet Of The Apes meets The Wild Angels.”

 

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A critic who likes to be cruel for the sake of comedy might say: “Intersect is about a boy with a wolf for an arm who encounters Alice Cooper,” but I like to think I’m above that.

I like the texture of the painting, but the composition isn’t working for me. Then again, it perfectly matches the book description, which opted for text with a lot of flavor that doesn’t actually tell me anything.

 

04

Please tell me this is going to be a really tall comic.

This image certainly has a lot of energy, though it seems strange to have this exciting lightning bolt! and exciting title! and then this person just standing there looking bored. Normally I like contrasts, but his boredom in the face of excitement makes me feel like I’m going to be bored.

 

03

 

I don’t understand why those decorative flourishes are only on the right side of the page, unless they did it just to drive people like me crazy.

Let’s talk about the logo first. I get that the looseness of the letters is meant to convey that this is going to be wacky, but it really just looks sloppy. While it conveys madness, it doesn’t really convey god-ness. If the word “Valhalla” had been written in that font used for the rest of the text, and then “Mad” was in a zany comedy font, the logo itself would have a visually interesting contrast that better communicates the story.

The teaser would then be improved by having the rest of the text in a plain font, except maybe the year (which could mirror the logo’s “Valhalla text.”

Also, y’know what would be better than text telling us its a story about “three lovable gods just here to have a good time?” A silhouette of three godly-looking people laughing and holding mugs. You could even build that silhouette into the logo Final Fantasy-style, and it’d be perfect.

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Update: It turns out the above image was actually half of a double-page spread, which makes much more sense. However, I still feel the logo could be stronger.

 

02

I like the decorative shapes being used here. The knives are a nice touch, if they represent that one character wants to backstab or is the enemy of the other. If that’s not what the knives are communicating, then I would’ve left them out.

The title text needs work. Serif fonts like that work well for small text, but they make for extremely plain logo text, even when hand-traced to give it an indie look. As much excitement as the illustration tries to convey, the plain non-logo title undermines it.

The red shape behind the title looks nice, except the hatch lines inside it don’t quite fit with the fully filled in colors in the backgrounds of the three main shapes. Instead of looking artsy, it looks like “I was filling this in with a marker, but got impatient and gave up.”

The placement of the Image logo looks like an afterthought, or a “I don’t know where to put this now, I’ll just wedge it in here.” A better place for it might be centered in the shape created by the overlapping red and light blue, or centered below the feet of the central character.

 

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My first impression of this image was that it was two people sitting on the nose of a runaway bike as it was popping a wheelie. It seemed pretty clear to me what direction they were moving, from the speedlines behind the back tire, and their relation to the horizon.

After staring at it for awhile, I realized a few things. What I thought were speedlines was actually the reflection of the bike on a shiny black surface. In fact, they’re not moving at all – the guy’s legs are firmly planted on the ground, not on the foot pegs, and the background image represents a completely different view angle. The only thing I’m still confused on is why there are bits of krackle to the left of the front tire if they’re not moving.

In short: this cover isn’t working. Even if the intent was to confuse, my question is “why?” It doesn’t make the cover more interesting to look at, it just makes me want to look at an illustration that makes visual sense.

If you removed the bike and left just the strip of background, with the logo filling the black space below, I would love this image. If you removed the strip of background, moved the bike up a little so it’s more clear that there’s a reflection under then, and moved the logo to the upper left, I would call this a strong image. As is, it’s not working.

 

See you in a few months.


Kate Willaert is a graphic designer for Shirts.com. You can find her her art on Tumblr and her thoughts @KateWillaert. Notice any spelling errors? Leave a comment below.

Artist Randy Queen threatens legal action over unfavorable Tumblr posts

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Randy Queen is a skilled comics artist who often draws attractive women. He’s best known for Darkchyde but he’s worked on many other books over the years like Red Sonja and Witchblade. Escher Girls is a tumblr that posts pictures of ridiculously drawn comics women. As you do.

Some of Queen’s art was featured on the site, and he didn’t like it. So he used the DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) to sport these posts to Tumblr and get them removed, as reported at Techdirt and further explained here:

So, this morning we wrote about comic artist Randy Queen sending copyright notices to Tumblr to make a bunch of posts disappear, which were critical of his work. The take downs were for the Tumblr Escher Girls, which tracks and highlights the ways in which women are portrayed in popular media (frequently comics) — basically highlighting the ridiculous manner in which women are often drawn. Queen apparently wasn’t too happy about it and issued copyright takedowns to Tumblr, despite the strong fair use defense. The Escher Girls blog posted what was, frankly, an incredibly even-handed post about the situation, just letting people know what was going on. The author specifically noted no desire to fight back or attack Queen, but just to let people know. It appeared that Escher Girls had no plan to even file a counter notice.

While Escher Girls founder Ami Angelwings seemed pretty calm about the whole thing, Queen went further and threatened legal action against the blog for even mentioning it.

There’s a much longer account here that includes this protest from Queen:

In a letter to Ami, he openly believes her actions “publicly challenges my right to protect the perception of my IP as it exists today.”

That didn’t sit too well with the internet, drawing the ultimate diss in the form of a tweet from the Nerd King himself:

As someone pointed out, if Queen didn’t want his early work held up to scorn, maybe he could have said that. I sometimes post bad art here and one time a pretty well known artist complained, and it was clear he was having a bad day so I took it down. But this is the internet, buddy.
Tumblr is generality one big fair use, and there is no law that prevents someone from perceiving Queen’s art anyway they please. IT’s not like they called him a jackass, or thin skinned or defensive or silly. They were just pointing out some of his early art that presented figures in a certain way. I have a tumblr (sadly not updated very often) for The Brokeback Pose, one of a zillion that do similar things. This is like trying to patch up a ballon that got dragged through a cactus patch with a bandaid. It’s also very anti-free-speech. And the more people talk about this, the more upset he gets, now claiming he’s being harassed, and the victim of “character assassination.” Well, if pointing out that someone is acting in a very defensive thin-skinned way is character assassination, so be it.

Or as Rachel Edidin put it concisely:



SDCC ’14: Cover Story: The Art of the Cover – panel recap

By Matthew Jent

Oh, gang. What a fun panel.

Moderated by legend-in-his-own-time Mark Evanier, “Cover Story: The Art of the Cover” took five artists, gave them five of their own covers apiece, and had them talk about them. The covers had been chosen ahead of time, without the artists’ knowledge, and Mark hoped at least one of the choices would be a cover the artist didn’t like.

“Even if we take some potshots at your covers — it’s coming from a place of affection. Even Rembrandt had a worst painting.”

The Cover Story panel: Evanier, Conner, Staples, Brooks, Lee, Sakai.

The Cover Story panel: Evanier, Conner, Staples, Brooks, Lee, Sakai.

We’d be here foreverlong if we went cover-by-cover, so let’s just hit some highlights.

Amanda Conner.

“Jack Kirby hated doing covers,” Mark explained. “He never knew when to do them. Before the comic, he didn’t know what the most exciting scene would be. During the comic, he didn’t want to interrupt his flow. When he was done, he wasn’t emotionally invested in that issue anymore.”

“I agree with Jack,” Amanda said. “I prefer sequential storytelling. I like Norman Rockwell — when you can look at a piece of art and tell lots of things are going on in it.”

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Barbie #42. Marvel Comics. Art by Amanda Conner.

“Okay — this was before I got into storytelling. Boy, they made me make her way too skinny.”

JSA Classified #4, DC Comics. Art by Amanda Conner.

JSA Classified #4. DC Comics. Art by Amanda Conner.

“Y’know — geez, lookit her boobs! I wanted to pull a moment of time out to focus on the cover, a moment that happens in between panels. So you don’t see this in the book, but it still moves the story along. Paul Mounts colored it — I put the stars in the background, but he did the burst. If I trust him and leave the background blank, he goes in and does a nice design.”

This cover gave Mark the opportunity to tell a Wally Wood/Power Girl anecdote, with Amanda’s encouragement: “Wally said, ‘I’m going to make her boobs larger every issue until somebody stops me. I think they just took him off the book instead.”

Zatanna #12. DC Comics. Art by Amanda Conner.

Zatanna #12. DC Comics. Art by Amanda Conner.

“Okay, I don’t always do big boobs, guys. This is another example of moments in time you don’t see often. Zatanna lives in San Francisco now, and I wondered, what does she do every morning, before she goes to fight things that want to destroy the universe? Probably the same things I do: get a cup of coffee, and a muffin, and read her iPad. Except, on the Golden Gate Bridge. My favorite thing is showing well-known superheroes doing an everyday thing that you and I do.”

Fiona Staples.

“Last night were the Eisner Awards, aka the Fiona Staples Show,” said Mark, by way of introduction. “The best thing about the Eisners is that whoop from the audience when they agree, yeah, that’s the one that deserves it.”

Done to Death #1. IDW. Art by Fiona Staples.

Done to Death #1. Markosia Publishing. Art by Fiona Staples.

“This was my first issue of my first comic. It was an oil painting, before I did everything digitally. They cropped it, but — that would have been my call. It’s an awkward place to cut off the image, at a joint, at the neck.”

Saga #18. Image Comics. Art by Fiona Staples.

Saga #18. Image Comics. Art by Fiona Staples.

“For Saga, the cover is part of the entire package. We don’t give away much story on our Saga covers. I usually do the cover before he scripts it — Brian told me, put Lying Cat on this one and make it dark. I had a feeling something bad was going to happen, so I gave Lying Cat a bloody mouth, like she’d taken a bite out of one of our heroes.”

Mark Brooks.

“For the last few years, I’ve been pretty exclusively a cover artist. It’s not really storytelling — I’m trying to sell the book. The cover has to be done the month before Previews hits — if we’re lucky, we have a short paragraph of what happens on the inside. The beauty of designing a character as a cover artist — I don’t have to worry about the interior artist who has to draw every angle of that character for 22 pages.”

Amazing Fantasy #1. Marvel Comics. Art by Mark Brooks.

Amazing Fantasy #1. Marvel Comics. Art by Mark Brooks.

“My first for Marvel, ten years ago. It was introducing a new Spider-Girl. I really stunk at foreshortening, so her leg looks really weird. Joe Quesada designed the character, but I put in the pouches around her wrist — I still don’t know what purpose they would serve.” (An audience member shouts out — chaptstick!)

Cable/Deadpool #14. Marvel Comics. Art by Mark Brooks.

Cable/Deadpool #14. Marvel Comics. Art by Mark Brooks.

“One of the few times Cable got one up on Deadpool. But to keep them in frame, I had to have him hold the gun by the trigger and almost let it fall down, over Deadpool’s head. To this day, I think it looks very weird.”

Mark Evanier chimed in that, in earlier days, Marvel would have rejected this one because the figures obscured the title.

“That’s different now,” Brooks said. “I can pretty much cover up the entire title, as long as it’s with the main character of the book.”

Deadpool #30. Marvel Comics. Art by Mark Brooks.

Deadpool #30. Marvel Comics. Art by Mark Brooks.

“In the original solicit, Deadpool was dressed like Jimi Hendrix. Marvel found out Hendrix’s estate is very litigious. I had to go in and take out the striped shirt, take off the wig, and flip it so he wasn’t playing left-handed.”

Jae Lee.

“I always think I enjoy covers, but I always regret doing them. I’m not a fan of showing these out of sequence, because I’m afraid the same re-used images are going to crop up. I won’t have a lot to say about these because they were all done in a mad rush to get into the solicitations.”

Before Watchmen: Ozymandias #3. DC Comics. Art by Jae Lee.

Before Watchmen: Ozymandias #3. DC Comics. Art by Jae Lee.

“This was done for solicitation. It was an Ozymandias book, but the cover features the Comedian. Where this fight was happening, they were surrounded by falling action figures. I hadn’t finished it, so I cropped it and said, is this good enough for now? I said I would come back and finish it later. But I never finished it.”

Batman/Superman #8. DC Comics. Art by Jae Lee.

Batman/Superman #8. DC Comics. Art by Jae Lee.

“This was tough. It’s my second time drawing a car. I’ve been doing this 22 years and managed never to draw a car. I don’t know how to draw cars, so it has to be mangled. I don’t know how artists draw those things. The tires — I don’t know how you guys do it.”

“Also, Power Girl was much bigger than Superman, so we had to reduce her digitally. But then her head looked too big, so we had to reduce he head separately. It became a kind of Frankenstein project. I have a hard time looking at it.”

Amanda chimed in by saying she has no problem with cars, but hates drawing mangled wreckage.

“Oh, we should trade off,” Jae said.

Stan Sakai.

“I hate doing covers. I hate it with a passion. I have been doing covers with the same character for the past 30 years, so it’s difficult to think of a different situation for that character. The covers are done months ahead of time, and my writer, who is me, often has no idea what is going to happen in the interiors.”

Usagi Yojimbo #46. Dark Horse Comics. Art by Stan Sakai.

Usagi Yojimbo #46. Dark Horse Comics. Art by Stan Sakai.

“This was a commission — a guy commissioned me to do a kite festival. So it was four connected pages. We used it for two consecutive covers. The colorist is Tom Bluth, who is my colorist of choice. In Tom’s case, it’s always — do what you want, Tom. I give him very little direction. I’m surprised sometimes by his choices, but it’s always better than I would color things.”

Adolescent Radioactive Blackbelt Hamsters #1. Eclipse. Art by Stan Sakai.

Adolescent Radioactive Blackbelt Hamsters #1. Eclipse. Art by Stan Sakai.

“Strictly a job for the money.”

“That’s funny,” Evanier added, “I worked for Eclipse  — I don’t remember there being any money.”

Usagi Yojimbo #101. Dark Horse Comics. Art by Stan Sakai.

Usagi Yojimbo #101. Dark Horse Comics. Art by Stan Sakai.

“In Usagi, there’s always a little skull when somebody dies, and a guy always writes in saying how many skulls I had in that issue. So for this cover I drew as many skulls as I could. But then the guy didn’t write in, and I was disappointed. There was no logo, but Usagi is iconic now — when people see Usagi, they know it’s a Usagi cover.”

Donald Duck Adventures #32. Walt Disney Publications. Art by Stan Sakai.

Donald Duck Adventures #32. Walt Disney Publications. Art by Stan Sakai.

“Aw, I hate working for Disney. They kept saying ‘do it on model,’ but they didn’t give me any models! I must have drawn this duck’s head 7 times. The problem was, I was following the European design, which I prefer, and it’s a little different there.”

Evanier closed the panel by thanking everyone for participating, and saying he hoped panels like these remind folks that there’s always a story and a person behind the design choices of covers.

“These panels remind people — someone actually designed that. It gives people an appreciation for the art of the cover.”