Ezra Miller is co-writing a Flash script with Grant Morrison…wait, what??

5
23

Things are looking up at DC Films these days, with Aquaman being a billion dollar smash (their first since the Nolan Batman days), Wonder Woman 1984 being an actually highly-anticipated sequel, and Shazam! already getting critical plaudits from its early press screenings. And on top of that, there’s a few interesting looking projects on the horizon like Birds of Prey and this Elseworlds Joker movie that’s out in the Fall. It’s not quite MCU-Kevin Feige biggest franchise in the world type success, but it’s a hell of a bounce-back from Justice League‘s total bellyflop at the box office.
But remember when there was going to be a Flash movie? Yep, we’ve written about it ad nauseum really, and it’s shed two directors already (Seth Grahame-Smith and Rick Famuyiwa). But now, even with a third pair of hands in place (John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein) to direct things are still not on the right track for production to begin.
THR reports that star Ezra Miller and the writer-director duo aren’t quite seeing eye to eye on how the story should shape up, with Daley and Goldstein opting for a lighter-hearted take – with a tone rumored to be in line with Back to the Future and akin to a lot of their other work, like Spider-Man: Homecoming, while Miller wants something darker. You can take the fella out of the Snyder, but you can’t take the Snyder out of the fella, I guess.
And so, with the clock ticking down to the end of Miller’s contract (in May reportedly), he’s taking matters into his own hands and teaming up with Grant Morrison to develop a new script more to his own predilections, and said script could be delivered next week. It’s said that the studio wants more projects in line with Aquaman and Shazam!, and to fully shed the grimdark air that’s permeated the beginnings of this cinematic universe. But if they opt to not stick with Miller and Morrison’s take, we may be looking at a new Flash altogether ala the impending recasting of Batman.
Morrison is the most exciting development here, who has written the character sporadically in his career and mostly in the 90’s during his JLA run, though he also teamed with Mark Millar on a short run on The Flash title itself. Perhaps most pertinently, he’s the guy who brought back Barry Allen, who reappeared during Final Crisis. One way or another, I would really like to see this script.

5 COMMENTS

  1. All due respect to Ezra Miller, but who the hell is he that he’s given rope to overrule both the directors and the studio? It’s not like anyone will be running out to see it (if it’s made at all) because of his presence.
    Honestly, though, a Flash movie is really something no one needs or wants. Even though the TV show has gotten predictable, dark, and on the downhill slide, it provides everything someone who wants to see a live-action Flash would want.
    Regardless, if Warners lets the DC movies head down the dark path again, they’re even more clueless than I suspect.

  2. Oh, please! Grant Morrison is the most overrated comic book writer since…since…since everybody thought the prune faces that Todd McFarlane drew were so cool that they let him write stories too. Morrison obviously thinks he writes deep stories, but they are just incoherent and dull. And I agree with the comments above: Why make another dark DC movie? Oh well, Aquaman isn’t a very good movie either, so it’s hard to tell what will become a hit or miss.

  3. ““Let’s make Flash darker”: the exact reason I quit watching the TV series.
    Not every superhero needs to be Batman.”
    Batman does weill. That means everything else DC has needs to be more like Batman.
    That’s what the suits, at Warner Brothers think that the general audience wants.
    That is why they were inspired by Frank Miller’s the Dark Knight Returns for the last two t Superman films.
    As we all know, DKR, was a partial deconstruction of Batman and Superman. DKR and other deconstructions of superheroes were embraced by academia, and the wider culture that was cynical about the idea of good guys.
    Nicolas Cage was considered for a superman film directed by Tim Burton back in the 1990s.
    ” the decisions Tim Burton made were meant to illustrate how alien Superman is and how cut off he ultimately felt from humanity”
    “In the end, this would have been a movie steeped in comics canon, but also committed to deconstructing what the idea of Superman means.”
    “Dealing with that outsider, alien feeling is exactly what the character Superman needs in order for people like us to actually empathize with him,” explained Schnepp. “You’re not gonna empathize with a guy floating around with god-like powers. You’re gonna empathize with somebody who’s like, ‘How am I even an alien? I don’t know how to deal with this”
    (Opam,Kwame. Could Nicolas Cage’s failed Superman movie actually have been good? Jul 10, 2015, 6:30pm ED)
    not just darker stories but stories starring confused alienated characters with psychological problems.
    like ptsd, depression, and anxiety. while simultaneously dealing with social issues like homophobia,
    Mark MIllar has made a great career getting his stuff adapted to the movies by exploiting Hollywood, and the upper crust’s cynical attitude towards the idea of heroism.
    *The critics, the and all the cultured and sophisticated people with abbreviated credentials behind their names often think this way as well.
    Regarding, Todd, he drew certain things well and if you didn’t like his work, no one told you that you weren’t educated or smart enough to understand his work or you had to buy a “casebook” to understanding an incoherent and meaningless string of events he wrote.Grant Morrison pulled the high-brow version of you need to buy 30 issues to get the whole story with his Batman run, except there was no story. Stories aren’t really his thing. Can’t wait to see his touch brought to film, where viewers will need to watch multiple movies to understand one.

  4. Enough already with this “deconstructing” , just make good movies with properly written stories and characters. ’nuff said.

Comments are closed.