The Center for Cartoon Studies spits out good cartoonists like a volcano spits out lava

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Today is a day to send shout-outs to the Center for Cartoon Studies, located in White River Junction, VT and recognize it’s many good deeds. While my shout out should be a loving essay on how teaching comics has had a strong effect on storytelling and how the bucolic yet isolated campus in rural Vermont allows students to focus in on making comics, or the print room or the other great things about the faculty which includes James Sturm and Steve Bissette, I don’t have time for that.

Instead I will just direct you to Rob Clough’s series looking at the WORK of CCS grads and spotlight a few of them:

Laura Terry’s Graveyard Shakes to be published by Scholastic

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Laura Terry is a cartoonist, a graduate of Pratt and the Center for Cartoon Studies and a former Xeric Grant winner (for Overboard). And now she’s had an original graphic noverl called Graveyard Shakes picked up by Scholastic. The cover looks great and the synopsis which you can read below also sounds very appealing. What interests me most about this deal is that, generally speaking, Laura Terry is unknown outside of minicomics circles, and this never appeared online as a webcomic, but she’s had a whole GN picked up for publishing by one of the most successful publishers in the business.

FILM REVIEW: CARTOON COLLEGE Gets Under the Skin of Making Comics

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Representing comics production in popular culture has long been missing a piece of the puzzle. We’ve had excellent documentaries about ground-breaking creators like Will Eisner, characters like Wonder Woman, and even explorations of rising con-culture in the USA, but the least likely to receive attention, the mode of indie comics production right now, has come […]

Jason Lutes’ new project: games influencing comics

Bingo Baby

BY JEN VAUGHN – For anyone who has ever performed any improv, there is a simple rule: ‘Say Yes.’ Say yes to a situation when presented to you because your fellow troupe member has a story line. You can add even more “yes and…” The same rule applies to a game called Fiasco, which calls […]

Monsters, Zines, and MonsterZines with Stephen Bissette

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Weird tales and comics naturally go together. From the days of pulp stories with enthralling illustrations, through EC’s Wertham-harried evocation of the fantastic and grotesque, to the heydays of Vertigo and Darkhorse, readers want to see an artist’s interpretation of the strange and bizarre. And the most exciting weird comics bring visual elements to the […]

End of a Hair-a

The date was December 9th, 2011 when cartoonist and Center for Cartoon Studies professor Alec Longstreth shaved off his beard and shaggy do. A promise to himself in 2008, he decided to chart his progress through pictures of his hair and beard growth that would undoubtedly remind him daily of his commitment. Living in a small town with a beard as his shadow, Longstreth went from industrious Fellow of the school to an instructor of both summer workshops and graduate classes to the Acting Director (while James Sturm takes a much-needed sabbatical) . Even after all the excitement, he is still growing and evolving, deciding to learn watercolor on the side. Venture on to read more about the amazing cartoonist Alec Longstreth.

Vermont names Cartoonist Laureate: James Kochalka

By Jen Vaughn — What do you do with a man with a wild mind of his own and a pair of drawing hands that just won’t quit?

You make him KING.

James Kochalka is the one of forerunners of autobiographical diary comics with his syndicated comic, American Elf, which is also available online and began way back in October, 1998. He is also the creator of other excellent comics like irreverent SuperF*ckers and children’s books like the Johnny Boo series and most recently, Dragon Puncher. His comics are published by Portland-based comics publisher, Top Shelf.