Riad Sattouf’s “The Arab of the Future” wins top honor at Angoulême festival prizes

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The winners are in. and Riad Sattouf won the top prize for Album of the Year, for his L’Arabe du Futur (The Arab of the Future) which will be published in the US this fall by Holt. As might be expected from the title, the book deals directly with the matter of the day, and I expect it will get a lot of attention. Sattouf is well known in France for his cutting social humor, and is also a prize winning film director. Here’s the rest of the winners with my rough translations of the prize names from the official site—the only American prize was Chris Ware’s Building Stories for the Jury Prize.

Sony picks up Lemire & Nguyen’s Descender after a “competitive bidding war”

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People in Hollywood are STILL liking indie comics. Descender, one of the mighty Image armada by Jeff Lemire and Dsutin Nguyen, has just been picked up by Sony after what THR called “a competitive bidding war.” That could be only four figures…or more figures. The book comes out in March. I’m running out the door so here’s the PR:

Nice Art: Clowes’ cover for The Complete Eightball is revealed

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Let’s leave off this week with a glorious image. Eightball ran for 18 issues from 1989 to 1997 and was the medium for such classics as “Art School Confidential”, “Live a Velvet Glove Cast in Iron,” “Ghost World” Dan Pussey and more more more. Traversing the gulf from rough humor comics of the 80s to […]

Meanwhile in Angoulême: Charlie Hebdo gets special prize; Comixology coverage and just how big is it?

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A round-up of news from the FIBD in Angoulême, with a sale from Comixology, live reports on bomb sniffing dogs, a prize for LES ROYAUMES DU NORD, continued controversy over Sodastream, and questions over just how many people actually attend the festival.

Treating comic con guests right: one creator’s suggestions

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Sean Gordon Murphy, a creator no stranger to speaking his mind, has offered a Creators Rights at Conventions , which includes lots of positive stories, but also some rules that suggest some not to great experiences.

Bendis on working for Marvel

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On his Tumblr, Brian Micheal Bendis was asked about why he’s stayed with Marvel when so many others have gone 100% creator owned. Seems like most of the guys from your generation (Fraction, Brubaker, Millar) made a name doing their own stuff, built up a name at one of the big 2, then left to […]

Kibbles ‘n’ Bits 1/30/15: Chew on this!

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A week’s worth of reading: § Has Manga Become a Niche Category? Johanna Draper Carlson examines some opinions on this, and quotes comments by Vertical’s Ed Chavez that I missed: The fact that shonen continues to be the only category that is consistently strong, and that moe has kinda catching up to shojo for second […]

Marvel unveils Women of Marvel Variant Covers

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When Marvel announced Girl Comics four years ago it unleashed a firestorm of outrage (just check out the comments if you care in the link). Now they are announcing a whole month of variant covers by female artists and everyone thinks it’s A-OK! Because suddenly women read comics.

Katsuhiro Otomo wins Grand Prix at Angoulême

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In what is not a shock but is a break with tradition, Katsuhiro Otomo, creator of Akira and Domu, has been awarded the Grand Prix at the 42nd annual Festival d’Angoulême which is taking place as we speak.

Otomo beat out beloved Belgian cartoonist Hermann (the safe choice) and Alan Moore, who probably would have just chucked it into his garden and forgotten about.

Lego Helicarrier, Lego Helicarrier, Lego Helicarrier!

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Lego has made a Helicarrier. Repeat, LEGO HAS MADE A HELICARRIER. OVER DO YOU COPY? And it comes with Black Widow AND Maria Hill! Oh and HAwkeye, Nick Fury and Captain America. And 3 Quinjets, and and and…It’s not the one from Avengers: Age of Ultron (if there is one) but who cares. It come […]

Preview: Squirrel Girl #2 —Enter Galactus

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With Squirrel Girl, Marvel is proving just how strong the Marvel brand is—so strong that it can do a 180 and it’s still part of the fun. Written by Ryan North (Adventure Time, Dinosaur Comics) and drawn by Erica Henderson (Atomic Robo, Marceline and the Scream Queens) this book is as “indie” and charming as comics can get. It even has lovely flat colors by Rico Renzi. Squirrel Girl is Doreen Green a typical college student except that she also has the proportionate speed and strength of a squirrel….and a big bushy squirrel tail, which she stuffs into her pants to keep her secret identity secret. Squirrel Girl was created in 1992 by writer Will Murray and Steve Ditko (!) and the gimmick is that even with powers that sound less than a-list, she can defeat anyone —and so far she’s defeated Doctor Doom, MODOK, Terrax, and Thanos, all with the help of her squirrel sidekick Tippy-Toe.

FanX kicks off in Salt Lake City today

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It isn’t primarily a comic-con, but Salt Lake City Comic Con’s FanX starts today, a three day show with a focus on nerdlebrities: Glen and Beth will be there; Walter White Jr will be there; Jamie Lannister will be there, Judge Doom, Doctor Who and even Princess Leia! A few comics guests as well, including Neal Adams. And a LOT of SF authors—Utah is actually the nerdiest state, and there’s a lot of support for this kind of material.

Graphix is 10 and reveals covers to new Craig Thompson and Jenni and Matthew Holm

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When Scholastic launched its Graphix imprint 10 years ago, graphic novels were a novelty, if you can pardon the expression, in the mainstream publishing world. And kids comics were an unknown quantity—comics shops didn’t want them and bookstores didn’t know what to do with them. In the first wave, there were many miscues and misunderstandings at many houses along the way. But Graphix wasn’t the one making them. Granted, starting out a line with Jeff Smith’s Bone is about as much a sure thing as possible—6.9 million copies in print and counting. But picking Raina Telgemeier to do a Babysitter’s Club relaunch and eventually Smile, and Kazu Kibuishi to publish his Amulet series weren’t as sure—but they sure paid off. Along the way Graphix has picked up multiple Eisner Award wins and nominations, a Stonewall Book Award, a Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor, an Edgar Allan Poe nomination, and 14 New York Times bestsellers. They’ve published many more top cartoonists such as Doug TenNapel, Greg Ruth, Mike Maihack and Jimmy Gownley. And there’s more to come.

New CAF: the New South Festival 2015 in Austin

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There’s a CAF (comic arts festival) born every minute! Here’s a new one, the New South Fest in Austin. They have a tumblr and a FB page, and some art…and exhibitor applications are now open. The plan is an outdoor books and comics event to be held June 6th, 2015 at the French Legation Museum in Austin, Texas. “Our goal is to celebrate independent literature, alternative comics, small presses, and print culture. New South will be highly curated, focused, fresh, and irreverent.”

UPDATE: Oops should have dug a little more. This event seems to be run by Danithan Mejia of the Foxing Review, website under construction.

Preview: Project Superpowers: Blackcross #1 by Warren Ellis and Colton Worley

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Warren Ellis is having a crack at reimagining the Project Superpowers universe, and Blackcross #1 hits in March. We’ve had an advance peek and it’s not what might be expected, with a strong horror bent. Here’s some brand new pages of Colton Worley’s art to give you a taste, as well as variant covers by Jae Lee, Declan Shalvey and Tula Lotay.

A new edition of Street Angel is out today

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Speaking of AdHouse, a second printing of Jim Rugg’s classic Street Angel is out today, the story of a homeless girl who fights crime while riding around on her skateboard. It was action packed, sad and beautiful. Originally appearing in 2004, this book was, along with Scott Pilgrim, an early adapter of the “new mainstream” esthetic whereby comics broke out of both superhero and autobiographical tropes to reach a new, younger audience growing out of the manga boom. Originally published by Slave Labor the book had a cult following beforei being released by AdHouse last year. And now its in its second printing. Rachel Edidin has an overview of the book here.

The new edition has a pink pages and purple ink, making it perhaps the most perfect Street Angel edition of all. And just because I can here’s a preview: