Review: Nobrow’s 17×23 Showcase: moon men and hopeful dystopias

1723showcase cover

17×23 Showcase Contributors: Isaac Lenkiewicz, Kyle Platts, Henry McCausland, Nick Sheehy, Joe Kessler Nobrow Press Following on from the success of the excellent Nobrow anthology- a bi-annual publication of two halves: one comics and one illustration, and their Showcase series, a smaller format paperback comic which launched Luke Pearson’s much-lauded Hilda adventures, Nobrow produced this last July : […]

On the Scene: “One Thing Leads to Another” Comics Art Exhibit at Medialia Gallery

IMG_4588

On February 9th, from 4-7 PM, Medialia Gallery at 335 West 38th street hosted an opening reception for it’s 7th annual Panel to Panel Comic and Cartoon Art exhibit, this year entitled “One Thing Leads to Another”. Though the exhibition has been going for seven years, many comics event goers may not have heard of […]

INTERVIEW: Kelly Sue DeConnick: Marvel and More

sif

By Matt O’Keefe. Kelly Sue DeConnick is a relative newcomer to the Big Two, but that doesn’t mean she hasn’t been around. After years of adapting manga for Tokyopop she moved to writing her own comics, notably 30 DAYS OF NIGHT: EBEN AND STELLA with Steve Niles at IDW. Today, she’s writing and co-writing books for Marvel like CAPTAIN MARVEL, AVENGERS […]

Poisoned Chalice Part 1: From the Start of Superman to the End of Captain Marvel

8456235155_d9accbf605_m

Action Comics 1 Superman, co-created by writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster, first appeared in Action Comics #1 in June 1938, published by Detective Comics Inc, a fore-runner of National Periodical Publications and DC Comics. Virtually overnight it became a huge seller, and is running to this day, with uninterrupted publication for well over seventy years. A vast amount has been written over the years on the history of Superman, and by people substantially more qualified than I, but one claim, that Superman was based on the character of Hugo Danner, from Philip Wylie’s novel Gladiator, (Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1930), has some relevance to the larger story of Marvelman and, although I decided that it might be too far back to start this series of articles, if you’re interested in reading what I have to say about it, you should go read this article, and then meet us back here.