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Golden Globes Last night saw the 2020 Golden Globes come and go, and while there were many deserving winners, perhaps the biggest victor of them all was the Beat’s own Ed Douglas, whose scathing review of Cats was quoted live on the air by Ricky Gervais. That just about floored everybody at Stately Beat Manor I gotta say!

The rest of the show had to live up to that momentous occasion, and largely succeeded, though Gervais’ opening monologue had all of the energy of a Jeb Bush 2016 stump speech. His disaffected approach felt like it only worked in spurts, but the talent that followed behind him mostly picked up the pace – most notably: Jason Momoa sitting at his table in a tank top.

I repeat, Jason Momoa sitting at his table in a tank top:

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And that wasn’t the only notable comics-related moment. Captain America and Black Widow getting a nice on-stage reunion as Chris Evans and Scarlet Johansson presented an award together for Best Actor Musical or Comedy! Aw!

 

Though the medium got its biggest shout-out as Joker took home a pair of prizes, with Joaquin Phoenix winning Best Actor – Drama, and Heidi’s favorite Hildur Guðnadóttir won Best Score. Say what you will about that film, and a whole lot has been said, those are certainly the two more notable elements of it, and frankly I like to pretend Phoenix is also winning this prize for his incredible work over the 2010s in Paul Thomas Anderson and James Gray movies.

He also gave the sort of speech that you’d expect from Joaquin, lambasting his fellow stars for their usage of private jets and their own carbon footprints before getting played off the stage. Dude also dropped so many f-bombs about half his speech had to be censored:

A few other quick observations:

  • As always, the Globes are a bit of a iffy precursor for the Oscars, but they do serve as the most public-facing awards show ahead of the Academy’s vote and at least get folks out in the hinterlands talking about Parasite.
  • Speaking of: Bong Joon-ho threw down an absolute gauntlet with my favorite line of the whole evening when he said: “Once you overcome the inch-tall-barrier of subtitles, you will be introduced to so many more amazing films.” A quote so good, I had to share it on Facebook. Take up this call to arms and make Parasite your gateway to the incredible plethora of films from South Korea and beyond.
  • Though a close second in the best speech contest has to go to Stellan Skarsgård, who upon winning his Best Supporting Actor award for Chernobyl, thanked his makeup artist for finally giving him eyebrows, so people could remember his face.
  • It was a bit of a sedated show overall. Some of that might have been the laconic performance of the host, but it seemed a bit like there was a less boozy/party atmosphere overall. Of course, the real world situations in Iran and Australia hang heavy, and the latter was a topic returned to often in acceptance speeches (the Hollywood Foreign Press Association even served an all veggie meal to support sustainability!)
  • Not that it stopped everyone. Olivia Colman jumped up on stage after winning Best Actress in a Television Drama for The Crown half-sloshed.
  • The most interesting development might have been 1917 and Sam Mendes‘ sudden ascendancy as a possible Oscar spoiler. Going into the night, the frontrunners seemed to be Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, Parasite and The Irishman pulling a close third. 1917 as a late releasing powerhouse could upset the entire race, or at the very least, turn the Best Director category on its ear. Oscar loves flashy Director flexes like this, and 1917 is the flashiest one we’ve seen since Gravity. (Heidi adds: and this assures another Oscar™ for Stately Beat Manor deitycinematographerer Roger Deakins.)
  • Of course, I’m extremely delighted to see Taron Egerton and Awkwafina get their due as well, even if it’s just for this one show.
  • Tom Hanks, American Hero. He really is the best of us, you guys. Him getting choked up upon winning his Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award had taking a few hard swallows myself.

Here are the full list of winners, and we’ll see you next month when the Oscars roll around and things really get interesting…

Television:

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series — Musical or Comedy
Michael Douglas (“The Kominsky Method”)
Bill Hader (“Barry”)
Ben Platt (“The Politician”)
Paul Rudd (“Living with Yourself”)
Ramy Youssef (“Ramy“) – WINNER
Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series — Musical or Comedy
Christina Applegate (“Dead to Me”)
Rachel Brosnahan (“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”)
Kirsten Dunst (“On Becoming a God in Central Florida”)
Natasha Lyonne (“Russian Doll”)
Phoebe Waller-Bridge (“Fleabag“) – WINNER
Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series — Drama
Brian Cox (“Succession“) – WINNER
Kit Harington (“Game of Thrones”)
Rami Malek (“Mr. Robot”)
Tobias Menzies (“The Crown”)
Billy Porter (“Pose”)
Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series — Drama
Jennifer Aniston (“The Morning Show”)
Olivia Colman (“The Crown”) – WINNER
Jodie Comer (“Killing Eve”)
Nicole Kidman (“Big Little Lies”)
Reese Witherspoon (“The Morning Show”)
Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Christopher Abbott (“Catch-22”)
Sacha Baron Cohen (“The Spy”)
Russell Crowe (“The Loudest Voice“) – WINNER
Jared Harris (“Chernobyl”)
Sam Rockwell (“Fosse/Verdon”)
Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Kaitlyn Dever (“Unbelievable”)
Joey King (“The Act”)
Helen Mirren (“Catherine the Great”)
Merritt Wever (“Unbelievable”)
Michelle Williams (“Fosse/Verdon“) – WINNER
Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
“Catch-22″
Chernobyl” – WINNER
“Fosse/Verdon”
The Loudest Voice
“Unbelievable”
Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Patricia Arquette (“The Act“) – WINNER
Helena Bonham Carter (“The Crown”)
Toni Collette (“Unbelievable”)
Meryl Streep (“Big Little Lies”)
Emily Watson (“Chernobyl”)
Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Alan Arkin (“The Kominsky Method”)
Kieran Culkin (“Succession”)
Andrew Scott (“Fleabag”)
Stellan Skarsgård (“Chernobyl“) – WINNER
Henry Winkler (“Barry”)
Best Television Series — Drama
“Big Little Lies”
“The Crown”
“Killing Eve”
“The Morning Show”
Succession” – WINNER
Best Television Series — Musical or Comedy
“Barry”
Fleabag” – WINNER
“The Kominsky Method”
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
“The Politician”

Movies:

Best Motion Picture — Musical or Comedy
Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” – WINNER
“Jojo Rabbit”
“Knives Out”
“Rocketman”
“Dolemite Is My Name”
Best Motion Picture — Drama
“The Irishman”
“Marriage Story”
1917” – WINNER
“Joker”
“The Two Popes”
Best Motion Picture — Foreign Language
“The Farewell”
“Pain and Glory”
“Portrait of a Lady on Fire”
Parasite” – WINNER
“Les Misérables”
Best Screenplay — Motion Picture
Noah Baumbach (“Marriage Story”)
Bong Joon-ho and Han Jin-won (“Parasite”)
Anthony McCarten (“The Two Popes”)
Quentin Tarantino (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood“) – WINNER
Steven Zaillian (“The Irishman”)
Best Original Song — Motion Picture
“Beautiful Ghosts” (“Cats”)
“(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again” (“Rocketman“) – WINNER
“Into the Unknown” (“Frozen II”)
“Spirit” (“The Lion King”)
“Stand Up” (“Harriet”)
Best Original Score — Motion Picture
Hildur Guðnadóttir (“Joker“) – WINNER
Randy Newman (“Marriage Story”)
Thomas Newman (“1917”)
Daniel Pemberton (“Motherless Brooklyn”)
Alexandre Desplat (“Little Women”)
Best Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture
Tom Hanks (“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”)
Anthony Hopkins (“The Two Popes”)
Al Pacino (“The Irishman”)
Joe Pesci (“The Irishman”)
Brad Pitt (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood“) – WINNER
Best Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture
Kathy Bates (“Richard Jewell”)
Annette Bening (“The Report”)
Laura Dern (“Marriage Story“) – WINNER
Jennifer Lopez (“Hustlers”)
Margot Robbie (“Bombshell”)
Best Actor in a Motion Picture — Musical or Comedy
Daniel Craig (“Knives Out”)
Roman Griffin Davis (“Jojo Rabbit”)
Leonardo DiCaprio (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)
Taron Egerton (“Rocketman“) – WINNER
Eddie Murphy (“Dolemite Is My Name”)
Best Motion Picture — Animated
“Frozen II”
“How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World”
“Missing Link” – WINNER
“Toy Story 4”
“Lion King”
Best Actor in a Motion Picture — Drama
Christian Bale (“Ford v Ferrari”)
Antonio Banderas (“Pain and Glory”)
Adam Driver (“Marriage Story”)
Joaquin Phoenix (“Joker“) – WINNER
Jonathan Pryce (“The Two Popes”)
Best Actress in a Motion Picture — Drama
Cynthia Erivo (“Harriet”)
Scarlett Johansson (“Marriage Story”)
Saoirse Ronan (“Little Women”)
Charlize Theron (“Bombshell”)
Renée Zellweger (“Judy“) – WINNER
Best Actress in a Motion Picture — Musical or Comedy
Awkwafina (“The Farewell“) – WINNER
Ana de Armas (“Knives Out”)
Cate Blanchett (“Where’d You Go, Bernadette”)
Beanie Feldstein (“Booksmart”)
Emma Thompson (“Late Night”)
Best Director — Motion Picture
Bong Joon-ho (“Parasite”)
Sam Mendes (“1917“) – WINNER
Todd Phillips (“Joker”)
Martin Scorsese (“The Irishman”)
Quentin Tarantino (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)
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5 COMMENTS

  1. Not surprisingly, right-wing pundits loved Gervais’ bashing of movie people as pampered dolts who should keep their opinions to themselves. I personally think Gervais is a pompous ass in love with himself.

  2. I believe his principal criticism was that most movie people were gigantic hypocrites who like to lecture their audiences on morals without necessarily acting morally themselves.

  3. “I believe his principal criticism was that most movie people were gigantic hypocrites who like to lecture their audiences on morals without necessarily acting morally themselves.”

    That’s a perfect description of Ricky Gervais himself. Talk about hypocrisy …

  4. I like these comments that someone tweeted about Gervais:

    “1. If you’re going to roast people, don’t spend half the roast congratulating yourself for doing it.

    “2. When you’re a rich comedian with a Netflix deal, you’re not the Radical Truth Teller In A Room Full Of Showbiz Phonies.”

    He added that Gervais was like “an unhappy drunk trying to get thrown out of a bar.” Agreed.

Comments are closed.