C2E2 ’19: Hickman to Write X-MEN & Marvel Reveals 2019 Publishing Slate

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with reporting by Hussein Al-wasiti

We can officially stop speculating now. Marvel revealed during its Saturday C2E2 panel, “Marvel’s Next Big Thing,” that Jonathan Hickman will take on the X-Men starting in July. The critically-acclaimed creator will write two new series: House of X, with art by Pepe Larraz, and Powers of X, with art by R.B. Silva. Marte Garcia will do colors for both series. Marvel also revealed its publishing slate for the remainder of 2019.
“We are excited to have Jon back with the Marvel family, and we could not have asked for a better creative team to help usher the X-Men into a whole new era,” said Marvel Editor-In-Chief C.B. Cebulski. “While we can’t reveal too much about the story just yet. These new stories will redefine the X-Men and their place in the Marvel Universe. This is a historic moment both new and passionate fans won’t want to miss.”

“Marvel’s Next Big Thing” Panel. Photo by Hussein Al-wasiti.

According to a press release, the new House of X and Powers of X series will build on existing X-Men storylines and milestones. The two series will be released on an alternate weekly schedule; House of X #1 will debut the week before Powers of X #1.
Marvel also revealed its publishing slate for the remainder of 2019. As previously revealed, War of the Realms will kick off in April, followed by House of X and Powers of X in July, then Absolute Carnage in August. There will apparently be a fourth event launching in December, though details are still to be announced. During Saturday’s panel, the December event was teased as the “payoff” to the connective tissue of preceding events.
Check out the art for the new X-lines and the publishing timeline below and stay tuned for more news from C2E2.
Hickman to write House of X and Powers of X

15 COMMENTS

  1. Good poster by Brooks.
    Marvel has borrowed from the marketing of Marvel movies with their event graphic there. Subliminal, carry-over consciousness going on.
    Did have a laugh at the prospect of the premier collected Absolute Carnage tpb being called Absolute Absolute Carnage, but then remembered only DC uses that descriptor. Confounded.

  2. There is no marketing behind anything related to monthly x-men comics.
    (Grand Design, aside)
    Marvel has purposefully made the x-men as convoluted and unpleasant to read as possible for everyone except the most dedicated balding fanboy for the last 20 years.
    No one really reads the monthly x-men comics anymore.
    just like no one watches SNL and the Simpsons anymore, but somehow, these things are kept on the air, with mediocre talent just going through the motions.

  3. Hickman’s writing has just never clicked with me. Big ideas, but no heart, so it often feels like a bunch of shuffling chess pieces.
    That said, X-Men has been in need of big ideas for a long time, probably since Grant Morrison left. This is a huge win for Marvel and possibly the only hope the X-line has of becoming relevant again.

  4. since grant morrison left the x-men movies went on to be big franchise for fox and marvel made crappy x-men comics to spite fox.
    This is not a huge win for anyone. Hickman did not set anything on fire the last time he was at Marvel and he won’t this time. Comics don’t matter. Comics sales don’t matter. Here is what has probably happened. Hickman’s just falling on hard times and will be releasing a few editorially mandated stories, stories he puts little or no effort in, (see peter david’s recent work at marvel over the last two years) until he gets back on his feet and can demand more money.somewhere else. Remember Warren Ellis’ run on an X-men title in the late 2000s? Me either. This will be the same.
    Marvel has cut the wages it gives out. I doubt they can afford anyone who has a following (in comics).

  5. “Hickman did not set anything on fire the last time he was at Marvel”
    Um, Secret Wars sold a ridiculous amount across the board and sales haven’t been anything like it since.

  6. Stores always order a lot of event comics hoping that they will sell.
    That doesn’t mean they sold all those copies.
    Marvel’s events since then have been of lower quality. Marvel’s output in general has been aimed at people who don’t read comics so it’s no surprise that sales have been down since Hickman left.
    You have yet to prove Hickman is a draw. His creator-owned work sells around 30k. Don’t feel bad about your analysis. The industry is full of people who do not understand why some comics sell and why others don’t.’
    To complicate things further, there’s a tendency that EVERYONE HAS to lie and exaggerate the popularity and success of one’s preferred reading material.
    Again, don’t feel bad. The movie industry is run the same way.
    Hollywood execs had NO IDEA why Star Wars did so well.

  7. “Stores always order a lot of event comics hoping that they will sell. That doesn’t mean they sold all those copies.”
    This applies to every comic, and is thus a meaningless distinction.
    “it’s no surprise that sales have been down since Hickman left.”
    So you’re . . . agreeing with me. Cool.

  8. me“Stores always order a lot of event comics hoping that they will sell. That doesn’t mean they sold all those copies.”
    clueless person who has no idea how the world works”This applies to every comic, and is thus a meaningless distinction.”
    No, it doesn’t apply to everything. Businesses don’t order equal supplies of every product. They order different quantities of different products according to how many units they can sell of each kind of product
    Comic stores order more Batman comics than Scooby Doo comics because they know, from experience, that Batman comics are more popular with their customers than Scooby Doo.
    Stores will order far less copies of Scooby Doo because they know there is a smaller number of people who want to buy it.
    I can’t believe I had to explain this to an adult.

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