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Edie Nugent

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Edie is a New York-based writer, reporter, interviewer, and publicist with a passion for entertainment and geek-related media.

Review: strange things are afoot in Bill and Ted’s Triumphant Return

I wanted to like Bill and Ted's Most Triumphant Return #1. And for the most part, I did. It's got View Askew Productions veteran Brian Lynch on writing duties, who has done solid work for IDW's Buffy the Vampire Slayer series spin-off Spike: Asylum. It's got the art of Jerry Gaylord, who has lovingly personified other franchises like TMNT and Adventure Time. Yet while Bill and Ted were very much themselves, they also seemed to lose a little something in the translation.

Review: Big Con Job is a dark, meta, fandomy heist: and...

Palmiotti and Brady have created a group of characters instantly familiar to fans of comic books, science fiction and fantasy in general: aging TV stars wearily working the convention circuit to earn their daily bread. There's the buxom, Princess Leia-like love interest to the pulpy, Captain Kirk-ish Buck Blaster in the aptly-named series 'Treck Wars'. The pair look out into a sparse audience that has turned on them

Review: Punk rock and questionable choices are the ties that bind...

The time period of Boom Studio's limited series Curb Stomp is somewhat tough to pin down. The clothing styles vacillate from the 50s through the 70s, which of course form the template for the hot styles of today. The convenience stores have a modern look, as does the one television set I spotted (there's nary a cell phone or a computer to be found). At least for now, it doesn't really matter: Curb Stomp traffics in a genre defined by the pulp novels and exploitation films of those aforementioned eras, so it makes sense that the look of it is something of a review of these periods.

Review: dark deeds, secrets and lies lurk beneath the masks of...

Secret Identities #1 wastes no time in establishing it's universe. On the opening pages we're thrown into a two page splash of super heroics familiar to even the casual comic reader. A team of eight archetypal heroes, known as the Front Line, converge in battle over downtown Toronto. They include a beautiful and deadly alien woman, a rock-bodied hulk , and a silver-suited man of super-human speed. A portal has been opened over the Canadian city, spewing wave after wave of nasty hell-creatures crashing over our heroes.

Review: Agent Carter explodes with action and sacrifice

As I was drying my tears following the dramatic conclusion of this week's episode of Agent Carter, 'Snafu', all I could think about was that I wanted more. More Hayley Atwell as Peggy Carter, whose range and presence eats up every frame of this small-screen show that plays like a big-screen adventure. More of the fabulous, smart dialogue and fantastic supporting cast; more of the beautiful costumes and period lighting -- just more! More than just next week's season finale.

Review: Princeless: The Pirate Princess #1 packs a punch

This installment in the ongoing Princeless series is everything you could want from a title like Princeless: The Pirate Princess #1. A tough and self-assured lead, whose Father trained her from childhood to be a quiet, efficient warrior of the high-seas as opposed to a princess waiting in a tower for rescue. Yet in the latter situation is exactly where Raven Xingtao, the pirate princess, finds herself in the opening pages of the book.

Can a fan-led branding campaign save Constantine?

When people talk about saving John Constantine, usually it's a hopeless task, as the scouser magician's soul has long been consigned to hell for his many sins on earth. But another campaign to save Constantine is under way—and this time it's fans attempting to keep his TV show going past a 13 episode commitment despite middling ratings.

Review: crime makes a strange exit to Eden in Postal #1

Strange small towns commanded by dogmatic despots have long been a staple of post-apocalyptic fare like The Walking Dead. So when Postal # 1 opens on a church sermon delivered by a preacher waving a gun at a man who is bound at the foot of the altar, it seems a familiar scenario. Perhaps this is what the comic wants us to think, lulling us into a false sense of narrative security to contrast with it's intriguing final pages.

Review: Agent Carter triumphs in Russia with SSR love

The events of "The Blitzkrieg Button" fresh on her mind, Agent Carter distances herself from Howard Stark and reinvests herself with SSR just in time to prove her worth and lead a rollicking mission to Russia.