Five superhero shows put to the Bechdel test; only one fails

theflash

Last week, fellow Beat writer Alex Jones wrote this article about the TV show Arrow and it’s treatment of female characters. I don’t really follow Arrow, so I can’t say whether I agree with his assessment. But the premise got me thinking about whether any of these shows could pass the Bechdel test, i.e. the new standard for fictional female characters.

DC, WB, Mattel and Target going big on DC Super Hero Girls

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Everyone is teaming up for DC Super Hero Girls, the multi-company, multi-platform push for girls’ versions of DC’s lady characters. Target will have an exclusive line of apparel and toys; Boomerang will air a 44-minute special and the digital shorts. The line also claims some firsts: “the first-ever 6-inch action figure designed for girls; first 12-inch collection of action dolls featuring strong, athletic bodies that stand on their own in heroic poses; and first-ever action role-play toys for girls.”

Toys that stand on their own — kinda a nice metaphor there.

DC updates Scooby-Doo and other Hanna-Barbera characters but are they really 2016?

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Proving their worth as part of the larger Warner Bros. media family, DC Entertainment has just announced a comic book revamp of the Hanna-Barbera characters bringing the Flintstones, Scooby-Doo, Johnny Quest and Space Ghost and more into the “modern world,” A long interview with co-publisher Dan Didio and Jim Lee that doesn’t actually come out […]

Lucifer follows the X-Files to a strong debut amid a flood of comics-based TV shows

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It seems the new run of X-Files has been a hit. (It seems wrong to call it a relaunch or a reboot since it’s the same show with the same cast and credits, just after a 14 year absence.) Last night’s second episode paved the way for a strong debut for Lucifer, the new show based on the Vertigo comic. (Haven’t watched it yet but it’s on my hard drive.) X-Files is airing in Gotham’s spot for the next few weeks, and did better than that show:

Comics Detective: Todd Klein has nearly solved that big DC Comics Christmas party photo from 1945

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Just before Christmas, I ran a picture tweeted by DC Comics of the 1945 DC Christmas party, with many figures from comics history—from artist Joe Kubert to publisher Harry Donenfeld —in the room. The photo conveyed a palpable sense of the past brought to life, the clinking of glasses, the laughter of women, the camaraderie of the still young industry. And now Letterer/historian Todd Klein has identified as many of the people in the photo as possible.