Reviews for X-Men Apocalypse are awful — but it is just a vast Disney/Marvel conspiracy?

201605110501.jpg

I think we were all pretty shocked when we learned that Warner Bros. execs were blindsided by the bad reviews for Batman v Superman; they thought they had a crowd pleasing winner on their hands. However, it seems Fox execs may have been equally over-optimistic about X-men: Apocalypse, the new Bryan Singer directed mutant fricassee. The film doesn’t open here until May 27th, but reviews all went live earlier this week, usually a sign that the studio thinks the film will get great buzz. But, the buzz was…not great.

201605110504.jpg

‘Easily the worst’ X-Men Apocalypse slammed with AWFUL first reviews

X-Men: Apocalypse Review Roundup: X-Men Or X-Meh?

The Beat’s own Kyle Pinion was down on it: X-MEN: APOCALYPSE is easily one of the worst films of the franchise

…but it was Forbes’ Scott Mendelson who delivered the killshot:

‘X-Men: Apocalypse’ Review: It’s A Franchise-Killing Disaster

This movie doesn’t open for two weeks and it already has articles doing a post mortem: Why X-Men: Apocalypse Is Generating So Little Excitement

All of this in the wake of rapture and huge box office for Captain America: Civil War. Maybe people are tired of superhero movies? Maybe people are tired of BAD superhero movies?

Or maybe Disney.Marvel are just trying to kill movies from other studios by paying off reviewers at every outlet for these bad reviews!

That’s a sentiment that’s been expressed in The Beat’s own comment section and there’s even a petition that’s asking to “Stop Disney from paying critics:

Disney has been continually paying critics to attack Non MCU movies. MCU movies are safe. They’re not challenging at all. Just like a comic book movie is “supposed to be”. They’re not divisive or thought provoking. First they bashed Batman V Superman.They cleared BvS out of the way, gave Civil War (which wasn’t a perfect film) an Oscar, now they’re going to work on moving Apocalypse out the way…then they get offended when they’re accused of accepting gifts. Deadpool would have also suffered the same fate however it was released in February and was not an immediate threat. We need to raise awareness of this global plan to keep our films creative or risk have everything fall under the Disney label. Each studio brings their own distinctive and creative work and Disney needs to stop being greedy and understand this


This petition has only 387 signers as I write this, so more work needs to be done to uncover this conspiracy.

I’ll admit, I began to feel that something was wrong when I saw this X-men/M&Ms ad. Sure the lighthearted NIghtcrawler/Storm vibe captured some of the camaraderie around the mansion that has always been a hallmark of the comics. But it’s also way campy for a movie about a guy who brings pestilence and destruction to the world. The tone seems all over the place. I haven’t seen XM:A yet, but as with the comics, the convoluted timelines and characters of the movies are beginning to get a little draggy and maybe Bryan Singer has just been hanging around too long. 



At any rate, a movie that offers almost NO Wolverine, a checked out Michael Fassbender and an Oscar Isaac who has been made unattractive probably should have been held for review a few more days. Lesson learned.

PS: there is only one Kevin Fiege. Learn to live with this.

Comments

  1. Erik Scott says

    The fact that people think there is a “reviewers conspiracy” against non MCU movies in Hollywood is ridiculous enough to be hilarious to me. I liken what Kevin Feige has done guiding these movies a lot to what James Cameron is able to do – appeal to the widest possible base possible while sometimes taking critical accolades along with them. WInter Soldier is probably my favorite comic book movie (outside of The Dark Knight) and I loved Civil War, but mostly for what they are and not for blazing new achievements in cinema storytelling or anything (and I also think that’s fine. Not every movie has to have a message).) To be completely honest, I even liked Age of Ultron, but hated the first Avengers movie, so YMMV obviously on anything for any given person.

    All that being said, what I do think the success Marvel movies set other studios up for is more formulaic/carbon copy movies and I hope hope hope that that indeed is not what happens. I think B v S had it’s flaws (but I actually still really enjoyed it..again for what it was…and thought it stayed fairly unwaveringly consistent to the universe Snyder had set up in Man of Steel), but I don’t think tonally or storytelling wise you can say it had all that much in common with Civil War at the end of the day, and I think that’sa good thing. I think the most consistent criticism I’ve seen (and agree with to date) of Marvel Films to date is there isn’t a whole lot of variation in plot or storytelling to these movies and they all seem to have very similar setups. WHich is not to say that really makes them less enjoyable in the moment, but that I think formula can eventually breed laziness.

    Up until WInter Soldier, I legitimately thought Bryan SInger was the only director at that point to be able to juggle multiple characters in a storyline effectively with the first two X-en movies being an example, but especially with CW, the RUsso Brothers have proved me wrong. I think even in the flawed B V S, a lot of the best moments where the director/screenwriter realizing the little character moments are the most effective (the short scene between Bruce and DIana in the museum or Diana smiling after being thrown by Doomsday.)

    I guess in other words, I hope Hollywood doesn’t start throwing carbon copy movies in the MArvel mode at us. I think once that happens, these movies are sunk. I hope WB keeps true to its vision of “Director’s first” in their movies. I was talking to a friend the other day about that first wave of Marvel movies, and because of their recent string of successes, I think people tend to forget they had some clunkers in there too (Thor, Iron Man 2, etc.) But I would much rather the studios have a little bit of a mess and try something different than fall into the malaise of carbon copy movies that each look, sound, and feel like the last. Because as excited as audiences can be for these movies now, the WIDE audience that these movies need to capture to stay relevant and being made can fall off just as quick if they don;t try to challenge each other and be different.

  2. says

    Ahhh….I remember the days on the Rotten Tomato forums, listening to the fight brewing between the Star Wars: The Phantom Menace fans who were attacking Sony for “paying” for good reviews for Spider-Man, which was eclipsing SW:TPM at the box office. The Spider-fans dove into the hordes and the melee was stupendous, lasting page after page. No one won, but the scraping made good viewing

    As for paying for reviews? Never proven.. Time, as they say, will out.

    For now though…let the hate flow!

    *gets popcorn*

  3. Luis Giancarlo Roman Callirgos says

    What about a petition to put Bruce Timm in charge of the DC cinematic universe? I would sign that!

  4. Jer says

    Andrew L – Michael Doran also wrote a very positive review of Batman v. Superman:

    http://www.newsarama.com/28508-review-batman-v-superman-dawn-of-justice-grandly-succeeds-where-man-of-steel-fell-short.html

    Occam’s Razor suggests that Doran’s taste in movies is different from a wide range of other reviewers. Backing this up is his review of Fantastic Four, which he is negative about but defends somewhat as not being as bad as the Rotten Tomatoes reviews would suggest. So if your taste is similar to Michael Doran’s you might like this movie. If your tastes are closer to Kyle Pinion’s, you probably won’t.

    The idea that there’s a conspiracy at work is hilarious – the only thing close to a conspiracy I see at work is that Disney/Marvel has successfully gotten into so many movie studio execs heads that they can’t make a superhero movie without second-guessing themselves.

  5. Erik Scott says

    “Occam’s Razor suggests that Doran’s taste in movies is different from a wide range of other reviewers. Backing this up is his review of Fantastic Four, which he is negative about but defends somewhat as not being as bad as the Rotten Tomatoes reviews would suggest. So if your taste is similar to Michael Doran’s you might like this movie. If your tastes are closer to Kyle Pinion’s, you probably won’t.”

    This!!!!!!!!

  6. Roto13 says

    I don’t know what’s so shocking about a bad X-Men movie. It’s not like this is the first one. The X-Men franchise has been all over the place in terms of quality. That’s why I never get too excited for them. It’s nice when my expectations are low and I get something like First Class or Days of Future Past and really enjoy it a lot.

  7. Comic2read says

    I don’t believe Disney would pay for negative reviews about competitors because it’s not in their best interest the perception comic book movies can be bad. That would affect them.

  8. Tiago says

    I don’t believe in the conspiracy, but I do believe that Marvel movies get a free pass that others don’t.

    Marvel movies follow a formula. It appeals to a wider audience, they have humour and great action, and have managed to get good actors to flesh out known characters. Yet, they’re almost all the same…a joke here, a punch there, underdeveloped villains, and always setting something up for the future…it doesn’t mean it’s a bad formula, but there’s rarely anything that’s new. And they’re not that great stories, as they have great flaws, but since it’s done in lighter, funnier and punchy tones, people ignore those faults.

    Giving an example, the Iron Man movies…the first is a good one. The second is meh, and the third is a piece of junk…yet, look at their reviews, all above BvS. Why? Robert Downey Jr is perfect in the role, and that alone givse 50% of the grade, but there’s very little else in the movies that standout.
    Ant-Man is literally a copy of the first Iron Man movie, but now with another lovable actor, who does a great part.
    The first Avengers movie was a bit boring until last hour of the movie…the team joining up is forced, never tries to explain why or how somethings, but it’s backed up by good actors and jokes, so we don’t even bother with those small things.

    This latest generation of X-Men movies and Superman don’t have jokes.
    Superman has better action than Marvel’s, yet people say it’s too much action.
    X-Men has tried to focus more on story than action, and people complain it doesn’t have any action…and I agree, especially in Days of the Future, where the action was happening in the future in a pointless way. Now they’re giving us more action and we complain about it…
    Their actors, even though they’re good, are always seen as bad choices…everyone complained about Hugh Jackman when he was first cast as Wolverine, and now we’re sad that he’s about to stop…same can be said about Affleck, we were all “he’s gonna screw it up”, and he did a great Batman. Even Deadpool, that’s now a critical acclaim, it was a movie pushed by the fans to reality…the critics gave it good reviews, but before release they were very skeptical, especially about the R-rating…these issues never appear with Marvel movies.

    There’s lots of faults, including storytelling, in Marvel movies that we ignore and don’t even glance at…but they’re never ignored or forgiven in the rest.
    There’s a sense (atleast for me), that people put less expectation on Marvel movies and are less nit-picky than with the rest. Maybe it’s because Marvel belong to Disney, and we’re prepared to accept them as action movies for the kids, The others, since they’re trying to be marketed as more adult oriented, tend to be looked down from the start.

    This said, I really want to see X-Men:Apocalypse, as I am a fanboy, but I was already a bit “meeh” in expectations, because I thought they went at it the wrong way…and that’s the difference with Marvel and the rest, they always go the right way, even if it’s the exact same way as their other movies.

  9. Daniel says

    There’s a difference between a conspiracy and a bias. And there is a definitely an anti-DC pro-Marvel bias (conscious or unconscious) out there in the press and the fan community. Many critics have a clear preference for the sunny, glib, lighthearted nature of the Marvel formula and dislike the darker, more melancholy approach that the DC films take (the Fox Marvel films are kind of split right down the middle which is probably why there is no consistency to the reviews that they get).

    People are of course entitled to their own preferences (e.g., biases) but the problem is that these biases are unacknowledged and critics are using their dislikes to justify their negative judgments of the quality of a film.

    Just look at how the box office returns of BvS and Civil War compare to one another. Every headline with BvS talked only about how far the film fell below expectations. Yet with Civil War, which was explicitly expected to pull in $200 million domestically in its opening weekend, fell $20 million short of expectations yet was presented in almost every story as being an unprecedented success. When the Monday grosses came in for Civil War it was presented as being one of the best Monday grosses in history, yet it fell $3 million short of what BvS brought in on its first Monday after opening. That’s a bias.

    BvS was criticized for its world building, for including scenes that wouldn’t make sense or play out until several films later. Yet when Civil War did the same thing, it was held up as an example of intelligent serialized filmmaking because it wasn’t afraid to confuse its audience. That’s a bias.

    I have a bias for the DC films. I like dark, serious, melancholy, intelligent, and emotional filmmaking. The Marvel films don’t hit my sweet spot. That doesn’t mean they’re bad films. They’re solid if undistinguished filmmaking. It just means they don’t appeal to me.

    The analogy that I keep coming back to is if someone gave a negative review to “The Godfather” because it wasn’t funny enough. “The Godfather” wasn’t a comedy so it shouldn’t be negatively judged for falling short as a comedy. It should be judged for what it set out to do. Unfortunately, too many of the reviews of the DC films judge it for all the ways it fails to adhere to the Marvel formula when the goals of the DC films are completely different..

    Again, people can have a preference for one style over another, but Marvel consistently gets a pass for things that, when done in the DC films, are presented as fatal flaws. This is the danger of unacknowledged biases.

  10. Justin says

    Daniel – What you failed to mention is that the Monday where BvS did higher was because it was Easter Monday when many kids are out of school. You can’t compare the two. So your claim to bias is not true. Everyone has their own ideology about this topic which I find very fascinating. Why isn’t the answer the simplest one? Some movies are bad, some are good. There doesn’t need to be think pieces.

  11. Erik says

    Can we stop pretending the Marvel movies are good movies? They’re usually entertaining, but as others have mentioned, they’re mindless, generic action movies with a few jokes thrown in. They’re as cookie cutter as Hollywood gets. They’ve never lived up to the potential set by the first Iron Man, which was mostly sold on the perfect casting of Robert Downey Jr.

  12. Erik Scott says

    “Some movies are bad, some are good. ”

    This is entirely subjective though. It’s entirely empirical. The problem is the segment of people, like this post implies, trying to force subjective opinions as objective fact.

  13. says

    “Ant-Man is literally a copy of the first Iron Man movie, but now with another lovable actor, who does a great part.”

    I’ve seen this said so much, and it’s as if character doesn’t matter. For plot points, there’s similarity, but the character arcs are entirely different. Tony Stark: arrogant alpha type gets humbled and shamed, and tries to be a better man. Scott Lang: loser is at risk of losing his family, risks it in order to provide for them.

    That’s the way it is for a lot of Marvel movies. They have a villain problem, and the big explosions at the end have become tiresome (luckily Ant-Man and Civil War broke free of that), but they have really clearly drawn characters. Iron Man is not Thor, who is not Captain America, who is not Star Lord, who is not Ant-Man. That does a lot to differentiate the movies. I thought Civil War did a great job with Vision and Scarlet Witch, who were kind of bland in Ultron, That is definitely a problem with the X-Men movies, for example. I’m a life long reader, but the movies have about four clear characters and then a lot of bland people with powers.

    “Can we stop pretending the Marvel movies are good movies?”

    Is someone pretending they’re Oscar movies? I think most people consider them well made entertainment.

  14. says

    Conspiracy?! Could it just be, Marvel Studios knows how to translate their characters to film and the other studios don’t? (or can’t as well as Marvel does). I’ll give you that Marvel has that Disney money and SFX, casting, & producing is not a problem the way it might be for Warner Bros. or Fox who release superhero films as well as non-superhero films. Some of which are financial and/or critical successes…Its not like they depend on superhero films alone but let’s be honest, its a missed opportunity to not cash in on cape-flix. Marvel has the luxury of focus & formula on its side and boy do they take advantage of it.

    That being said, look what happens when those same studios take a chance and let someone who cares about the characters & about making a good movie do their thing–Deadpool most recently, and Reynolds had to fight for about ten years to get Fox to let him do it right. Christopher Nolan’s Batman films are another example. The Dark Knight slayed Iron Man 2 upon release, because Nolan had a bigger vision of treating the film as a crime-action thriller rather than just a comic book movie while still staying true to Batman’s core characterization.

    And why are we surprised X-Men: Apocalypse might be wack?! I’m most critical of X-Men films because its the team I grew up loving and being such a big fan, I know it could be done right and so it hurts to see them miss the mark over and over again, even with First Class & Days of Future Past (which are good movies but not good X-Men movies). I’ve yet to feel like I’m watching the mutant team I loved from the cartoons & comics up on the screen. Marvel may appeal to a wider audience but included in that audience are the folks like me who want to see Capt. America & Co. come alive out of the panels, onto the big screen.

    Don’t get me wrong, I want all comic book movies to be good. I want The DCEU to get it together as much as I want Fox to figure X-Men out. Currently, I’m anticipating Suicide Squad to be as awesome as it looks, especially since I love director David Ayer and believe he’ll do something special with the opportunity, so I do have higher hopes for that than I ever did for BVS or X-Men Apocalypse.

  15. MBunge says

    “BvS was criticized for its world building”

    Because it literally had nothing to do with anything else in the movie. The world building in Civil War included Black Panther, who played a significant role in the story, and Spider-Man, who was largely superfluous to the plot but at least got a lot of funny lines and some exciting fight scenes. The world building in BvS was Wonder Woman looking at some YouTube videos.

    Mike

  16. Tiago says

    “I’ve seen this said so much, and it’s as if character doesn’t matter. For plot points, there’s similarity, but the character arcs are entirely different. Tony Stark: arrogant alpha type gets humbled and shamed, and tries to be a better man. Scott Lang: loser is at risk of losing his family, risks it in order to provide for them.”

    Their character arcs might be different but they’re irrelevant as they have no influence on the story itself. One could even argue that we could swap places between them, and the movies would work out exactly the same. So even though they’re different characters, they do the exact same decisions, they fight the exact same villain, with the exact same intentions.,,yes there’s changes here and there, but they have no impact on the story.

    And don’t get me wrong, I might be more of an X-Men fanboy, but I enjoy all comic book movie, some more than others. I don’t believe in a conspirancy, but as someone pointed out there is some bias. Critics prefer the more light funny tone set by Marvel’s, and they use that preference as a comparision with other movies.

    Anyway, I’m still excited for the movie…reviews have no influence in my pleasure of watching a movie…the problem I see is that reviews have influence in how future movies are done, and that review is done with bias, because they forgive faults done by Marvel, but never when done by the others.

  17. says

    “Their character arcs might be different but they’re irrelevant as they have no influence on the story itself. ”
    I really can’t agree. Personally, I like character and atmosphere more than I like plot points. Usually the last third of a movie is the worst part, when the story takes over. Very few movies have competent stories, even outside of blockbusters. I don’t see how two very different characters add up to the ‘same’ movie.

    And I do love good stories, I just have given up demanding them from movies. I tend to look to good TV dramas for proper stories.

    Anyway, it’s all a matter of personal preference, and I won’t twist your arm to enjoy Ant-Man. No matter how enjoyable it was!

  18. Scott Davis says

    there is no Disney/Marvel conspiracy!!! it’s just people who are getting too familiar with Disney/Marvel’s tone and colorful approche of comic book movies so they feel everything else is bad, because they want everything like Marvel

  19. Erik says

    “Is someone pretending they’re Oscar movies? I think most people consider them well made entertainment.”

    My point is I don’t think they’re really even well made entertainment. They’re very generic, but it’s a kind of generic most people seem to like. Outside of Iron Man (and probably only because it was the first), I’ve never had the desire to see any more than once and have forgotten most of what happened pretty soon after seeing them. Obviously it’s subjective and most people seem to enjoy them more than me.

    “there is no Disney/Marvel conspiracy!!! it’s just people who are getting too familiar with Disney/Marvel’s tone and colorful approche of comic book movies so they feel everything else is bad, because they want everything like Marvel”

    This is a big part of it. BvS has a ton of flaws but it seemed like the thing most people focused on was that it wasn’t exactly like Marvel.

  20. George says

    “Giving an example, the Iron Man movies…the first is a good one. The second is meh, and the third is a piece of junk…yet, look at their reviews, all above BvS.”

    I recall a lot of bad reviews for Iron Man 2 (which was mercilessly slammed on the internet) and mixed reviews for Iron Man 3. The general feeling was that Downey and Paltrow were better than the movies.

    “I have a bias for the DC films. I like dark, serious, melancholy, intelligent, and emotional filmmaking. The Marvel films don’t hit my sweet spot. That doesn’t mean they’re bad films. They’re solid if undistinguished filmmaking. It just means they don’t appeal to me.”

    I would describe the Marvel movies as great TV. They’re not quite cinema. Their lack of any sort of mood or atmosphere makes them very much like long TV episodes that are projected in theaters.

    It’s interesting (and odd) that DC’s TV shows are generally lighter than their movies, while Marvel’s TV shows tend to be darker than the movies.

  21. Tiago says

    “I really can’t agree. Personally, I like character and atmosphere more than I like plot points. Usually the last third of a movie is the worst part, when the story takes over. Very few movies have competent stories, even outside of blockbusters. I don’t see how two very different characters add up to the ‘same’ movie.”

    I would agree with you, except that there’s no character progression in either Iron Man or Ant-Man…even if we consider all Iron Man appearences, there’s nothing much that changes, in fact even when he changes a bit at the end of one movie, in the next movie he’s back doing what he was doing before. Both characters are the exact same person in the beginning and end of the movie….Marvel movies don’t go much into character development.

    But as I’ve already pointed out, I like Marvel movies, I just don’t understand why critics forgive faults in Marvel movies that they don’t in the rest. The character development is one of those issues…no one bothers about it in Marvel, yet if some character doesn’t evolve in X-Men, well then it’s bad movie…that’s literally what this reviewer is saying about X-Men Apocalypse.

    My opinion is that Marvel has found the perfect formula for superheroes movies…the other studios have to try something different. Critics tend to dislike those attempts, and prefer the formula. Now, I don’t know if Apocalypse is good, as I haven’t seen it…and I honestly believe it will be worse than Days of Future Past, but really doubt it’s going to be as bad as every reviewer is pointing out.

  22. George says

    If nerds won the war for pop culture, why are they so angry all the time?

    http://www.hitfix.com/motion-captured/if-nerds-won-the-war-for-pop-culture-then-why-are-they-so-angry-all-the-time

    “We should be celebrating in the streets en masse, one big joyous nerd hive mind in triumphant ecstatic exclamation of victory, and instead, Batman fans are sending rape threats to movie critics they dislike and people are starting petitions to prove shadowy conspiracy theories. Fandom eats itself with gleeful abandon at the exact moment it should be enjoying its status as conqueror.”

  23. Oliver_C says

    “If nerds won the war for pop culture, why are they so angry all the time?”

    Because nerds don’t want to just win, they want TOTAL DOMINATION; because nerds don’t just want superhero movies, they want EVERY movie to be a superhero movie; because nerds don’t want the New York Times to just review ‘Watchmen’, they want the New York Times to review NOTHING BUT comics.

    I know this because I used to be a nerd myself.

  24. George says

    My impression is that whenever a geek reads a bad review of a superhero movie, they flash back to the time in middle school when someone bullied them for reading comics. One pan of any superhero movie is enough to ruin their day and infuriate them.

    The only upside is that videogame fans are even more stupid, ballistic and threatening, especially toward any woman who intrudes on “their” turf. That’s who makes comic-book fans look good (by comparison): videogame fans.

    Grow up, guys.

  25. Ted says

    1. Making movies that reliably appeal to a wide swath of the moviegoing audience is REALLY HARD and Marvel deserves tons of credits for doing it two or three times a year.

    2. DC’s movies are dreary and pornographically violent crap. This is why nobody likes them but hardcore DC fanboys who haven’t been alienated by a decade-plus of identical comics from DC. Watching their movies fail is almost as delightful as watching Didio/Johns/MeltZerized fans crybover it.

    3. I am trying to think of a blog of this stature that would run an article that complained a movie had made a female actor unattractive and not get called out for it.

  26. Nadia says

    Heidi’s core point is sound that reviewers are not being bribed by Disney or part of some conspiracy. Matt Singer at Screen Crush liked X-Men Days of Future Past and wrote a thoughtful review of that film. Reading his review of Apocalypse and his stuff on social media, it becomes clear that sincere disappointment was at play rather than bias.

    But did Fox choose to let the movie screen early because they thought reviews would be positive? Heidi relies on conventional wisdom to assume this was the case. Nobody has reported that Fox decided to show the movie since they thought they had the goods. The movie comes out sooner in foreign countries, and that might have played a role. They may have also felt like it was better to have bad buzz out of the way so that it was old news closer to the release date. Finally, they may have simply been clamoring for buzz and figured that even mixed reviews would get attention.

    Heroic Hollywood reported that tracking did not register a plunge or anything.

  27. Nadia says

    Also, this article refers to Fassbender as checked out and mentions no Wolverine. The Last Stand and especially X-Men Origins: Wolverine had plenty of the character as well as no gorgeous, esteemed actors covered in paint. Yet, those were not movies that one would expect reviewers to respond well to.

    With respect to being Fassbender being checked out, you don’t know that. I realize that writing about movies is about having a strong voice in your opinions and stating it authoritatively and honestly. But, you can’t be sure whether an actor is checked out.

    The review at this site does not clearly imply that Fassbender was done with the role and didn’t give a damn. Indeed, Kyle writes, “When Fassbender exclaims to a God that he feels has forsaken him, it’s delivered in such an over the top fashion, I was looking for where the teethmarks were left on the scenery.”

    Some reviewers like Chris Nashawaty and Michael Phillips perceived boredom in Fassbender. But others saw him as one of the bright spots in the movie and praised his performance. They include Empire, Collider, Screen Crush, and Vox. Film Stage said he gave his level best in a tragic scene. So, it is not a given that he did not care anymore.

  28. Aaron Browne says

    We are ‘Americans’ / consumers: -all we can do is sit in traffic, pay for stuff that is crap, be cold and dismissive while flicking our fingers at screens instead of being decent to anyone that that does not fit our comfort zones, we are ‘entitled’ to make efforts to try to ‘out’ someone as ‘gay’ at work just because someone is single w/no kids and not married and over the age of 31, we are ‘entitled’ to be mean and abusive towards anyone that is not 100% into things like sports, guns, trucks, bible thumping or the military (-how does sports breed ‘teamwork’ in this fake country???), we are only allowed to work in remote office parks that offer junk food and be surrounded by parking lots and asphalt, and strip malls that only offer crap and merchandising from marketing machinations like this corporate tool of a movie. No one ever posts comments on creating booths at comic conventions for people to sign petitions to ban all Fox X-MEN movies, and we can post it online and update it in real time -that would be anti-‘American’/consumer, since we all have to keep track of crap, and be alienating towards anyone that does not fit our brands, music, ‘look’, and TV shows.
    ***
    Early 21st Century former-US anti-culture for something like a ‘film’ is all about branding, and fulfilling the brand images the actors have in their contracts, and certain forms of expressions and messages have to all be edited and conformed to first (think along the lines of the Comics Code Authority, for example), then an actual ‘movie’ is made second.
    ***
    We no longer live in ‘countries’, we live in consumer zones, and branding zones, and corporate limits, and private properties owned by foreign entities/companies, and it is totally OK to keep track of crap like another lame X-MEN movie, instead of keeping track to how to make our own movies, our own sequential (to all you consumers, sequential m -MAKE THE MOVIE YOURSELVES, and stop paying for this crap that is all about merchandising, and consumer social engineering. We are lazy, and mean, and bigoted, and apathetic; we are ‘Americans’/consumers.

    No one cares -we have films being made for going on one hundred years now, and BvS should had been a home run: THE MOVIE PRODUCERS DONT CARE. STOP EXPECTING THEM TO MAKE SOMETHING GOOD. We are consumers, so they know we will just post comments complaining w/out any real effort to ban their ‘movies’/merchandising machinations. Think about it, the largest consumer markets are India first, then China, and since all the companies -even though they may be based out of ‘America’- only cater to the largest consumer market, then ‘Americans’ will only have access to what will be catered to Indians, and Chinese. If live rock and roll music, and live RnB and black performers were ‘popular’ in Asia as a whole, then there would had been more rock bands and live music culture, and another Prince/Michael Jackson/James Brown already setup to take Princes place (a record company can have Drake fill stadiums world wide, but they cant find someone like Rhianna even and teach someone like her how to play the guitar and piano -even if it is half as good as Prince it would still be a killer voice w/a guitar jamming !), but since the mid 90’s (when GATT became WTO) we are at the mercy of cheap labor, cheap goods, only electronic music and dance music, and the number of live venues has decreased -just like the only time Marvel had decent comics in the past 30 years was just before they crawled out of bankruptcy, and before their setup for their Disney buyout -see NuMarvel-.

    So we speculate about a ‘conspiracy’ in this article -lame, so ‘American’. We do not matter, we complain, sit in traffic, getting cancer is a matter of ‘when’ not ‘if’ as an ‘American’/consumer, and we will still pay to see movies and buy the merchandise, and post comments that offer no solutions, and only cutting people’s comments down, being mean, and being an all around consumer/’American’.

  29. Aaron Browne says

    You guys are keeping track of movies reviews, and directors, and comic book interpretations -not that this stuff is ‘bad’ but the disparity between knowing how to provide actual ‘solutions’ and cooperate w/anyone ‘different’, how to meet your congressmen, city council members, be involved in nonviolent protests, and going to town hall meetings for example (you know, those things that you are thanking a solder for when you say ‘thank you for your service’, but you have no desire to be involved in or make sure high school grads all know how to be involved in -because we all play sports, and have ‘teamwork’, and think we are ‘Americans’), and what ‘Americans’ know about brands like movies and fantasy football, and what has gluten in it, is waaay to great, waaayyyy to significant -how can things not get worse in this fake country: this article and comments are a great example of how fake this country is.

    “…we will build a better one!”, says Apocalypse in the trailer: so did he mean more asphalt, more parking lots, more bigotry, more alienation, more brand identity, more goods and services made to break down and tag us w/more debt/fees/hidden fees? Yeah! Keep track of those movies reviews, and b.s. while you will still pay for the ‘comic books’ filled w/ads at well over $3.50/issue, and movies that are all about brand identity and corporate policy, and crappy merchandise made to break down and take your money and time, and keep that emulating machine / ‘brains’ conceptualizing about being a consumer. Stop paying, and spending your time on FOX X-MEN merchandise, and movies. “Sacrifice” -a taboo word in ‘American’/consumer culture.

  30. Aaron Browne says

    Solution? :
    When we can have computer graphics technology bring us NOT human actors, but virtual ‘actors’/cgi ‘actor’-characters, THEN we will have movies that will not be first based on and catered mainly to things like Hugh Jackman’s or Jennifer Lawrence’s contract agreements and brand identities, (like Baron Zemo could have the comic book book look, as the actor would not play him, since his face/brand would be covered up w/a purple mask)…?

    So, in the mean time, start making your own movies, and sequential. Check out some of the scenes fans have made based off of Firefly / Serenity -here is a show that lasted only ONE season, and has a never dying fan base, -so is why Joss Whedon screwed up Age of Ultron? -the movie had to conform first to corporate metrics, corporate policy, actor contract agreements…? Damn, all I can do is speculate, and go on being an ‘American’/consumer. How can Whedon make The Avengers, and then screw up Age of Ultron…??? How can we all care so much about all these brands, yet we could care less about holding anyone accountable for outsourcing, and the fact that it is not possible to have long term savings, the fact that regardless of salary and education the majority of an ‘adult’ ‘American’ ‘life’ is grueling traffic, pushing someone’s corporate policy while we snitch at co-workers at work, and having our brains be exposed to screens w/ads disguised as entertainment w/commercials and more advertisements being surrounded by strip malls, only car culture Costcos and Wallmarts and more alienating behaviors and abuse, and more traffic, and junk food and more and more crap…??? This stuff is all fun and interesting, but we are going no where with these types of articles and comments.

  31. Michael Grove says

    “BvS was criticized for its world building, for including scenes that wouldn’t make sense or play out until several films later. Yet when Civil War did the same thing, it was held up as an example of intelligent serialized filmmaking because it wasn’t afraid to confuse its audience.”

    Actually that’s not true at all. If there’s something the average joe movie goer doesn’t grasp in Civil War, they can find the answers in the films leading up to Civil War. BvS is the exact opposite. The average movie goer can’t possibly know what a mother box is because we see it for the first time in BvS. And that’s the problem for DC, trying to do what Marvel did only in reverse. We have to look forward to answers about the characters in the DC films rather than go on the journey with the characters and learn at the same rate as the characters as we do with a Marvel film.

    Also, I’m not really getting the criticism that the look of all the films is generic. It’s the same world. That was the plan all along. To give the films comic book continuity. All the films add up to one story, not a bunch of different ones. Audiences know this now just as they know to stay until the credits are over so they can get a peek at the next chapter. It’s the modern day version of the old Columbia serials of the 40s. How much sense would it have made if Peter Jackson cast all different actors for each Lord Of The Rings film or have the look of the world of the Rings films be entirely different and lacking consistency and continuity?

    But that’s a double edged sword. The films not being entirely stand alone might turn off some. The audience, like comic book readers, can’t start a MCU film in the middle of the series and expect to know everything that’s going on any more than a comic book reader can start a 12 part comic book story arc at issue 10 instead of 1 and expect to know entirely what’s going on. To some that will obviously be a turn off. “What? I have to watch 8 movies to know what’s going on? That sucks!” And I totally get that. But I think Disney/Marvel made this clear from the very beginning to audiences. There was a deal struck between Feige and the audience and both sides are keeping their end of the bargain.

    But the criticism of “same old marvel world over and over” can be remedied by setting aside some characters to be in films where the film makers have more creative freedom. And that might actually work to the advantage of certain marvel characters. I’d like to see some of the characters reserved for Pixar style movies.

    And no, the marvel films are not on par with Citizen Kane. Neither are the DC films. I mean, I have to chuckle a little at reviewers who compare anything in BvS to Kubrick. Superhero films aren’t brilliant, thought provoking cinema. They’re, for the most part, just fun. If the success of the Marvel films or the perceived failure of the DC films are all about sabotage at the hands of Disney and paid off critics, then what part does the audience play? The average movie goer rarely even reads a review in the first place. Many just want to be a part of the current superhero movie zeitgeist. I didn’t care for BvS but a ton of people did because it made record amounts of money. It’s the audiences that are driving the success of superhero movies. It’s audiences that will make the final decision on whether superhero films are over or not, not critics, not rotten tomatoes, not Disney and not an insular and tiresome fan base.

  32. Aaron Browne says

    @Michael Grove :

    You asked, “…then what part does the audience play?”, and I would say William Wray best depicts the answer to this:

    http://art.cafimg.com/images/Category_47886/subcat_112214/image.jpg

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-a25rEZ6P33U/Ug_ZFWa4j8I/AAAAAAAACO4/KPuqY3-wfK4/s1600/Sentenal+of+Justice.jpg

    I hope this comment post is allowed, since it contains links, but in any case, if a super conglomerate like Disney/Marvel, and Time/Warner/DC can make more money from investments in lobbyists for tax loop holes, offshore hedge funds, and futures trading, and investments in property funds and ponzie schemes, and investments from people’s pension and retirement funds, and from insurance payments, while gaining cost savings from outsourcing manufacturing, and labor, and atomization, = they they do not really need to ‘make money’ from the our spending on a movie, as most of the ‘profits’ are not from us consumers, yet more from the other means I just noted along w/merchandising and brand licensing -so as long as the company can reach quotas and meet their own internal profit margins, then who cares about ‘people’/consumers (if our combined wealth is not even 15% of the total wealth, then who cares about a bunch of ‘consumers’ spending on a ‘movie’ or ‘comic books’?)? If we are totally OK with being surrounded by asphalt, grueling traffic, ads disguised as entertainment w/commercials, everything being made to bread down and take our money, alienation and bigotry, w/only ‘news’ and no journalism, no real sense of accountability to enable nonviolent protesting and participation in government and mobility and livability (-these are all every day facts in ‘America’), then how can you have an argument that “It’s the audiences that are driving the success of superhero movies. It’s audiences that will make the final decision on whether superhero films are over or not, not critics, not rotten tomatoes, not Disney and not an insular and tiresome fan base.”? We do not matter.

    You state, “How much sense would it have made if Peter Jackson cast all different actors for each Lord Of The Rings film or have the look of the world of the Rings films be entirely different and lacking consistency and continuity?”, and yet more and more crappy Batman movies were made in the 1990’s, because our ‘opinions’ and ‘feedback’ do not matter, Also, Quesada did not care about switching up the artists doing the ol ‘one-two-switcheroo’ w/”e is for Extinction” when he removed Quitely, because knew we are consumers first, ‘people’ second, and we still always $pend.

    “The average movie goer rarely even reads a review in the first place. Many just want to be a part of the current superhero movie zeitgeist.” -Actually RottenTomatoes, and IMDB, and reviews on YouTube (even though YouTube’s/Google’s search engine sucks now) are poplar, and frequently discussed by us consumers/’Americans’. Since ‘American’/consumer anti-culture is mainly based on screens (the Internet is dead, all we have are ads disguised as entertainment, commercials and more actual ads, and login accounts that are used to track what we do for data mining>predictive analytics>social engineering/marketing -so much for the early marketing lies about the Internet ‘democratizing’ our way of life), then if you want all these super hero movies to just be considered a fad, then yeah, all we have then is some kind of twisted ‘zeitgeist’. If you want something to last, then create various insightful, creative/innovative permutations of the character-based assets that are not strictly the current consumer based predictable branding machinations for merchandising and licensing and proft based grabage, -like the string of Batman 90’s movies. The WTO loves us soo very much.

  33. Aaron Browne says

    @Michael Grove :

    You asked, “…then what part does the audience play?”, and I would say William Wray best depicts the answer to this:

    http://art.cafimg.com/images/Category_47886/subcat_112214/image.jpg

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-a25rEZ6P33U/Ug_ZFWa4j8I/AAAAAAAACO4/KPuqY3-wfK4/s1600/Sentenal+of+Justice.jpg

    I hope this comment post is allowed, since it contains links, but in any case, if a super conglomerates like Disney/Marvel, and Time/Warner/DC can make more money from investments in lobbyists for tax loop holes, offshore hedge funds, and futures trading, and investments in property funds and ponzie schemes, and investments from people’s pension and retirement funds, and from insurance payments, while gaining cost savings from outsourcing manufacturing, and labor, and atomization, = then they do not really need to ‘make money’ from our spending on a movie, as most of the ‘profits’ are not from us consumers, yet more from the other means I just noted along w/merchandising and brand licensing -so as long as the company can reach quotas and meet their own internal profit margins, then who cares about ‘people’/consumers (if our combined wealth is not even 15% of the total wealth, then who cares about a bunch of ‘consumers’ spending on a ‘movie’ or ‘comic books’?)? If we are totally OK with being surrounded by asphalt, grueling traffic, ads disguised as entertainment w/commercials, everything being made to break down and take our money, alienation and bigotry, w/only ‘news’ and no journalism, no real sense of accountability to enable nonviolent protesting and participation in government and mobility and livability (-these are all every day facts in ‘America’), then how can you have an argument that “It’s the audiences that are driving the success of superhero movies. It’s audiences that will make the final decision on whether superhero films are over or not, not critics, not rotten tomatoes, not Disney and not an insular and tiresome fan base.”? We do not matter.

    You state, “How much sense would it have made if Peter Jackson cast all different actors for each Lord Of The Rings film or have the look of the world of the Rings films be entirely different and lacking consistency and continuity?”, and yet more and more crappy Batman movies were made in the 1990’s, because our ‘opinions’ and ‘feedback’ do not matter. Also another exmple that is common in comics, Quesada did not care about switching up the artists doing the ol ‘one-two-switcheroo’ w/the artists in ”e is for Extinction” when he removed Quitely, because knew we are consumers first, ‘people’ second, and we still always $pend.

    “The average movie goer rarely even reads a review in the first place. Many just want to be a part of the current superhero movie zeitgeist.” -Actually RottenTomatoes, and IMDB, and reviews on YouTube (even though YouTube’s/Google’s search engine sucks now) are poplar, and frequently discussed by us consumers/’Americans’. Since ‘American’/consumer anti-culture is mainly based on screens (the Internet is dead, all we have are ads disguised as entertainment, commercials and more actual ads, and login accounts that are used to track what we do for data mining>predictive analytics>social engineering/marketing -so much for the early marketing lies about the Internet ‘democratizing’ our way of life), then if you want all these super hero movies to just be considered a fad, then yeah, all we have then is some kind of twisted ‘zeitgeist’. If you want something to last, then create various insightful, creative/innovative permutations of the character-based assets that are not strictly the current consumer based predictable branding machinations for merchandising and licensing and proft based grabage, -like the string of Batman 90’s movies. The WTO loves us soo very much.

  34. Aaron Browne says

    @Michael Grove :

    You asked, “…then what part does the audience play?”, and I would say William Wray’s “Super Hero” paintings best depicts the answer to this.

    I hope this comment post is allowed, since it contains links, but in any case, if a super conglomerates like Disney/Marvel, and Time/Warner/DC can make more money from investments in lobbyists for tax loop holes, offshore hedge funds, and futures trading, and investments in property funds and ponzie schemes, and investments from people’s pension and retirement funds, and from insurance payments, while gaining cost savings from outsourcing manufacturing, and labor, and atomization, = then they do not really need to ‘make money’ from our spending on a movie, as most of the ‘profits’ are not from us consumers, yet more from the other means I just noted along w/merchandising and brand licensing -so as long as the company can reach quotas and meet their own internal profit margins, then who cares about ‘people’/consumers (if our combined wealth is not even 15% of the total wealth, then who cares about a bunch of ‘consumers’ spending on a ‘movie’ or ‘comic books’?)? If we are totally OK with being surrounded by asphalt, grueling traffic, ads disguised as entertainment w/commercials, everything being made to break down and take our money, alienation and bigotry, w/only ‘news’ and no journalism, no real sense of accountability to enable nonviolent protesting and participation in government and mobility and livability (-these are all every day facts in ‘America’), then how can you have an argument that “It’s the audiences that are driving the success of superhero movies. It’s audiences that will make the final decision on whether superhero films are over or not, not critics, not rotten tomatoes, not Disney and not an insular and tiresome fan base.”? We do not matter.

    You state, “How much sense would it have made if Peter Jackson cast all different actors for each Lord Of The Rings film or have the look of the world of the Rings films be entirely different and lacking consistency and continuity?”, and yet more and more crappy Batman movies were made in the 1990’s, because our ‘opinions’ and ‘feedback’ do not matter. Also another exmple that is common in comics, Quesada did not care about switching up the artists doing the ol ‘one-two-switcheroo’ w/the artists in ”e is for Extinction” when he removed Quitely, because knew we are consumers first, ‘people’ second, and we still always $pend.

    “The average movie goer rarely even reads a review in the first place. Many just want to be a part of the current superhero movie zeitgeist.” -Actually RottenTomatoes, and IMDB, and reviews on YouTube (even though YouTube’s/Google’s search engine sucks now) are poplar, and frequently discussed by us consumers/’Americans’. Since ‘American’/consumer anti-culture is mainly based on screens (the Internet is dead, all we have are ads disguised as entertainment, commercials and more actual ads, and login accounts that are used to track what we do for data mining>predictive analytics>social engineering/marketing -so much for the early marketing lies about the Internet ‘democratizing’ our way of life), then if you want all these super hero movies to just be considered a fad, then yeah, all we have then is some kind of twisted ‘zeitgeist’. If you want something to last, then create various insightful, creative/innovative permutations of the character-based assets that are not strictly the current consumer based predictable branding machinations for merchandising and licensing and proft based grabage, -like the string of Batman 90’s movies. The WTO loves us soo very much.

  35. Aaron Browne says

    Here is a link I was references above regarding the role we have been performing as ‘comic book’ readers:

    http://williamwray.com/superheroes.html

    Is it possible for sequential to play a role, instead of consumer/’American’ ‘comic books’ for Marvel and DC? Is it possible to make consecutive great movies? Probably not, since we all are willing to spend, -and even if we try not to pay attention to all the commercialized b.s., it is still propagated EVERYWHERE in our fake asphalt, strip mall, traffic, billboard, crappy consumer-bigot anti-culture…

    It’s like in ‘America’ you are considered ‘artsy’ or ‘fringe’ or ‘alternative’ if you do not like the current crappy consumer brand identity driven predictable form of movies and ‘comics. Then folks create articles like this based on speculation. I was going to ask -where are the sites that do not offer consumer driven, speculative crap about super heroes, but since Marvel and DC are not capable of doing anything outside of brand-identity and formulas that are based on merchandising and consumerism, why would there be any sites that offer real journalism about quality superhero sequential?

  36. NJCaliboy says

    The theory of a conspiracy is beyond ridiculous it’s laughable and really not even worthy of comment. But the responses to the main article are well thought out and great topics for a lively debate.

    RE:The Marvel Bias and DC negative bias. DC didn’t do the same any favors coming out of the box as “anti-Marvel’…. you had the direct Z.Snyder making negative comments about how the DC universe won’t be like Marvel (to suggest Marvel was something less than desirable)- he even made a joke about the Ant-man movie. You also had other actors joking about the competition between Marvel and DC setting the stage for the ridiculous Marvel/DC fan wars.

    Why take this approach out of the box?? You have tons to lose and not much to gain going this route. As others pointed out already, Marvel has nothing to gain by DC doing bad- the opposite is quite true as the average movie goer doesn’t know the difference between Marvel and DC. When one movie of the genre is branded as “bad” it has a negative lasting impact for the entire genre, thankfully the opposite is also true..

    I think it’s time for Marvel and DC fans to unite and for the ridiculous war between fans to end- especially for the sake of DC movies. At the end of the day I believe most people have good will for both companies and just want good quality movies that inspire the imagination!

  37. says

    Erik said:

    “Can we stop pretending the Marvel movies are good movies? They’re usually entertaining, but as others have mentioned, they’re mindless, generic action movies with a few jokes thrown in. They’re as cookie cutter as Hollywood gets. They’ve never lived up to the potential set by the first Iron Man, which was mostly sold on the perfect casting of Robert Downey Jr.”

    I think WINTER SOLDIER was better cinema than anything else nominated for best picture in 2014.

  38. Aaron Browne says

    OK, – Age of Apocalypse has just f()ck!ng aswsome graphics, and I liked how the storm continuity was kept together… BUT, ha! geekn out… after FIVE X-MEN MOVIES

    NOW, not counting the other spin offs…, yo man, wtf! Pietro was the best opportunity to have Magneto form his Brotherhood in that movie, and the whole lack of

    confidence telling him he was his son… F()c^ that…! No way, so lame… the ending as a SIXTH installment in the sage GLOBAL franchise: dud. I agree w/other

    reviews that say the whole ‘getting the band together again’s was using up the gist of the span of the film, the ending could had EASILY culminated in several kick

    ass battles, and the whold geek satisfaction w/your normal ‘consumer’ leaving the theater going -“Wow, Apocolyse is the S+!+, I want to go read comics about him…!”

    but no dice, and Magneto should had assembled some Brotherhood out of nowhere at one point w/Blob, Mystique, her oracle girlfriend, and Pyro w/Rouge… The fouth

    Hourseman instead of Magneto could had easliy been Kitty Pryde, or even Jean Grey -yeah, Jean: point being = regardless of who the fourth horse man could had been

    besides Magneto, You Do Not Have That Much Destruction And Then Think Just Ending That Guy Apocalypse Is Just Going To Lead To Anything Remotely Resembling Their

    `90s And Whatever Else Era B.S. -cities were disintegrating, and Nightcrawler is made out to be a ‘b!+(+, still whith his ridiculous scars, and meek self pity

    praying -the comics, the REAL Nightcrawler always had grace, and class, and style, and he had condifdence, and was never ever really able to get over people freaking

    out at him, this actually very civilized person -kind a decent extreme example how how someone from Europe would generally be considered ‘different’, and at the very

    least ‘alienated’ in most towns and suburbs where most ‘Americans’/consumers live. So, good job on the intro thoug for Jean and Scott -Scott Summers though should

    had been in a school for the blind when they first showed him, as he was hiding his ‘disability’/power after he and his brother fell from that plane, stick with the

    original plot(!) its easy -see how much cooler I could had made this movie… The ending was too ‘ephemeral’ and extreme with the level of destruction that it was

    anticlimactic -and there should had been Farouk there -maybe he could had been the fourth horseman, and he could had had the class phsycic battle vs. Xavier at the

    end -w/Jean Grey backing him up channeling the P-force…

    So the best thing about these new era peices is the way they can show the parts of history that had never been part of the comics; Xavier and Eric’s history, and

    Hand, and Raven’s background… So this could had been a great way to have had the story of Magneto’s kid, Polaris, or even Wanda, and Pietro, and have him freak out

    about his babys’ mamma’s death and some similar shtikt that would still work the with sequential mythos =because Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Chris Claremont, Jonn Byrne,

    and so on are all really THAT GREAT, and the movies should flow w/them, their story, OUR Mythos… Not a ‘brand’, or some set of metrics, and contract and marketing

    patter analysis crap weak over destructive ending -the world would still be in the dark ages, especially considing the oil crisis at that time in early 80s we were

    all coming out of, and everyone was fleeing the decay of the cities into sprawl and then this movie’s level of destruction made the dialog at the end with their

    ‘required’ levels of dialog completed to ‘tie up emotional and other b.s. plot threads’….

    ***
    Magnets was SERIOUSLY an act of God in this movie to an extent where everything else made no sense… Like him suddenly joining everyone at the end, and they are all

    like smiling and ‘meh, let help eachother’… it was just too tie things up that make no sense. After what Magneto did, AND HE IS LIKE ONE OF MY FAV’S YO, like

    geeking out and all, but PUT A BULLET IN THAT MO’FO’S H E A D yesterday, NOW -he needs to go, he just devastated the entire world, w/ no nukes it is middle ages,…

    sorry, I GET IT, this is a movie, but after all those movies there could had been character moments that were not just regurigiting the same plot threads and brand

    images that actors have required in their contrands and the producers will make money of the merchandising and licensing so the ending was just ‘fill’…

    FOX: It is OK to build upong past storie now, you have enough movies and merchandising crap that you can have your plots and characters flow into NEW STORIES AND

    BETTER MOVIE ENDINGS now… PLESE

    Boycott all Fox X-Men movies, the ending of this was lame for somehting this ‘Epic’, and Moira or whatever her name is, should had always been from Europe, and a

    geneticist, and had a kid w/Xavier, and he never should had whiped her mind -he is not a coward, but MacAvoys over dramatic voice is also anti-climatic at the end…

    Sorry @$$ ending for somehting that is now only ‘epic’ as a merchandising / licensing franchise, and somehting movie stars use as a global stepping stone branding

    campaign -yeah, REWARD YOUR FANS, dont f()^ w/out wallets and time whle jobs are outsourced and automated, and everything is made to bread down and take money, and

    traffic, and asphalt, and Apacolypse movies that after SIX X-MEN movies turns out to ALMOST work =ME LIKE STORM SO MUCH, that gal his so amazing= Alexandra Shipp is

    about to EXPLODE, that white mohawk n her face is totally worth seeing the movie alone, I have to say… See that Alexandra Shipp movie that has the blue guy with

    the rebar sticking out his neck, and some guy that gets bald… List to Chemical Brothers during the movie n ‘chill “=)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *