Review: Two tiny books with big differences between them


Nicolas by Pascal Girard This is a deceptively simple book that takes slices from the life of creator Pascal Girard’s life that all revolve around his younger brother, who died as a child. Girard’s cartooning takes form in simple scrawls, but the childlike renderings hint at the young man who lives inside Girard and has since […]

Guy DeLisle’s “Hostage” coming from D&Q next year


      Canadian graphic novel artist Guy Delisle is slowly unveiling details about his upcoming book “Hostage”. The book will relate the real life experience of Christophe André, an administrator at Doctors without Borders who was kidnapped in Chechnya in 1997 and held hostage for over 100 days. The French version of the book, […]

Review: Brecht Evens and the complications of growing up


Unfolding like a children’s book gone horribly wrong, Brecht Evens’ Panther begins with the death of Christine’s cat and the appearance what might be an imaginary friend designed to take its place and ease the sadness of the loss. Panther springs out of Christine’s bottom drawer and into her life with a sly charm that […]

Review: Michael DeForge’s ‘Big Kids’ tells us something about ourselves


Millennials are often portrayed by the older generation – my own, to be clear – as a generation of victims. Like most cross-generational proclamations, this is a self-righteous pile of bull built from Gen Xers’ and Boomers’ stumbling reading of Millennial discourse, as well as some resentment for our own repression and the ability of […]

D&Q January books: New Oliveros, new Drnaso and more Lutes and Skeezix


D&Q has just announced their January releases, including a new edition of Jason Lutes’ Berlin, more Gasoline Alley, an exciting debut graphic novel from Nick Drnaso AND The Envelope Manufacturer, the book by former D&Q publisher Chris Oliveros, who has been quietly working on this book for years. The subject matter — the gradual erosion of a small business — echoes Seth’s Clyde Fans and maybe even the comics industry? We’ll find out!

In case you’re wondering about Jason Lutes long simmering epic, a new issue, the 18th, came out last May, and he’s slowly but surely working on completing it.

31 Days of Halloween: Kitaro by Shigeru Mizuki


So many Halloween comics are coming out this season. Here’s one that’s available as part of Halloween Comic Fest: BIRTH OF KITARO by Shigeru Mizuki, the origin story for Mizuki’s most popular character. Kitaro is a one eyed boy with strange powers—because he’s actually a 350-year-old yokai (spirit monster). While you may know Mizkui from […]

And now D&Q is available on Comixology and Kindle


Well, D&Q was just about the last digital holdout among prestige comics publishers, but today they have joined the throngs with a full selection of books available both via Comixology and in the Kindle store. Books you can download include Lynda Barry’s One! Hundred! Demons; Guy Delisle’s Jerusalem: Chronicles from the Holy City; Rutu Modan’s […]

Oliveros steps down at D&Q as Burns is named publisher


As revealed in the Globe and Mail, a change at the top of one of the most lauded and loved alternative comics publishers was certain the #1 topic at the parties of TCAF: Chris Oliveros, founder of Drawn & Quarterly is stepping down as publisher to focus on his long dormant cartooning career. Peggy Burns will succeed […]

D&Q’s spectacular Fall includes Beaton, Tomine, Mizuki, Chippendale


Although most of these books have been announced, here’s all of Drawn & Quarterly’s fall schedule in all it’s glory. You can read the complete catalog here — commentary below is my own.

Guy DeLisle’s Pyongyang film adpatation scrapped after Interview disaster


In case you missed it, Sony Pictures has been forced to cancel the theatrical release of The Interview after hackers have released a catastrophic trove of private emails and scripts, and threatened to bomb theaters showing the film—and theater owners began saying they wouldn’t carry it. The film follows a pair of bumbling journalists sent to North Korea to assassinate Kim Jong Un, and apparently, Supreme Leader did not like this plot line.

The repercussions of this Hollywood disaster will be felt for years to come, but one piece of collateral damage was a planned adaptation of Pyongyang, Guy DeLisle’s graphic novel about his two months spent in the North Korean capital working on an animation project. New Regency has pulled the plug on the project which was to have starred Steve Carrell and be directed by Gore Verbinski from a Steve Conrad script. However the log line for the movie bears little resemblance to the book that I read: