Do we need The American Sequential Arts Guild?

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Over the years there have been many attempts to start a comic book creators union or guild. Neal Adams tried one back in the day, and got frustrated and gave it up. Tony Harris recently tweeted about starting one before he got distracted by something bright and shiny. And now Rantz Hoseley, Eisner winning editor of COMIC BOOK TATTOO, is back with more thoughts on a new idea for a guild.

You can read about it below and comment a bit further below. Comics creator guilds have traditionally been scotched by the differing goals of so many in the business and cat herding nature of the business.

What do you all think?

Image publisher Eric Stephenson on recognizing and growing new talent

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The recent argument over Image, reprints and retailers, it’s clear that conscientious retailers and creators are trying to figure this out together….it’s not a fiscal cliff type dead end. But it also underscores one of the biggest stories of the year: The ascent of Image as a very real competitor to the “Big Two” in terms of content and audience. And SAGA—an extraordinarily entertaining hit by any standard—has been the poster child for this. While the contributions of Fiona Staples can’t be ignored, it also shows up the staying power of Brian K. Vaughan as a writer who can command attention. Indeed, the other day I was kibitzing with someone starting a new project and joked “All the industry needs is 20 more books written by Brian K. Vaughan.”

Image publisher Eric Stephenson saw my quip posted on a private message board and responded with this mini-essay on the flow of talent and supporting new and future stars:

I would add, Heidi, that when I started working on staff at Image in December of 2001, Brian K. Vaughan wasn’t particularly well-known, let alone a phenomenon. I personally associated him – rather unfavorably, in fact – with what at the time was DC’s most recent Swamp Thing relaunch. Within a couple years, he was writing one of my all-time favorite series – and that was just one of his many triumphs.

Around the same time, I regarded Robert Kirkman as “that guy who does Battle Pope,” or “the Funk-O-Tron” guy. Robert had a couple false starts at Image, but Invincible launched pretty strong out of the gate, so we decided to take a shot on what would become eventually one of not just Image’s, but the industry’s, most successful series ever.

John Layman was an editor at WildStorm, and he shepherded through some great material, but he wasn’t a “big name.” We did a cool little series with him called Puffed, he did some work at other publishers, then he approached us with Chew. We’ve sold over 100,000 copies of the first Chew trade at this point.

Looking beyond Image: Before Powers, Daredevil, Ultimate Spider-Man and Avengers, Brian Michael Bendis was the quietly celebrated creator of some great crime noir books – Jinx, Goldfish, Torso – and Ed Brubaker started out in comics with Low Life, before establishing a slightly more mainstream reputation at WildStorm with Sleeper, then doing Catwoman at DC, and so on. Before Captain America, Uncanny Avengers and Uncanny X-Force, Rick Remender did some great writing on Black Heart Billy, Doll & Creature, Strange Girl and XXXombies.

I could go on for hours listing examples, but my point is this:

Yes, Brian K. Vaughan is a phenomenon.

Yes, more books by BKV would be great for all of us. Same with more books by Robert Kirkman, Brian Michael Bendis, Ed Brubaker, Rick Remender, Scott Snyder, Jonathan Hickman, Matt Fraction, Warren Ellis, Jason Aaron, John Layman, Mike Mignola, Brian Azzarello, Darwyn Cooke, Kurt Busiek, Neil Gaiman, Mark Millar, Bryan Lee O’Malley, Alex Ross, Garth Ennis, Jeff Smith, Craig Thompson, Greg Rucka, Grant Morrison, Alan Moore and whatever other favorite writer, artist or writer/artist you personally would add to the list.

But something else that’s beneficial to everyone is solid and continued support for new creativity. 

There isn’t a single name on that list that didn’t start out on another list – because all of them were new talent at one point. Once upon a time, they were all unknowns that someone decided to take a chance on. 

So as cool as it would be to have 20 more books by Brian K. Vaughan, I think it would be even cooler if we had 20 books by the next Brian K. Vaughan, the next Robert Kirkman, the next Brian Michael Bendis, and so on. Because even thought more work from our best writers and artists is always a good thing, the only way this industry is going to stay vital and fresh is with a constant influx of new.

Not new number ones or new takes on old concepts, but new talent talent and new ideas.

All you’ve got to do is take a look at the works that have lasted over time, things that sell and sell and sell, and I think you’ll see that over the long haul, new creativity wins out every time.

Stores will still be selling books like Saga and Parker and The Walking Dead and Scott Pilgrim long after the latest creative team changes on the New 52 or Marvel NOW. The way to grow this business is to have more books like that, and the way that happens is by finding, developing and supporting the new voices who can provide us all with that kind of work.


 

MoCCA Fest 2013 announces steering committee, new projects

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Last summer, the Musuem of Comics and Cartoon Art in NYC lost their physical space and transferred their assets to the Society of Illustrators. Although the SoI is a well-regarded institution, there was a lot of private concern over the MoCCA fest and how it would proceed. Details of the first SOI run show have just been released, and it sounds like things are coming together pretty well, under SOI’s Anelle Miller with a steering committee including industry-aware folks including Karen Green, Paul Levitz, Charles Brownstein, Tucker Stone and the Secret Acres duo of Leon Avelino and Barry Matthews. Several new programs are planned, including a program book, awards, art exhibits and a cafe.

MoCCA 2013 takes place April 6-7 at the Lexington Armory. PR below.

The Society of Illustrators is proud to increase the visibility of comics as a major component of its storied institutional mission by hosting the MoCCA Arts Festival on the weekend of April 6 – 7, 2013 at the 69th Regiment Armory in Manhattan. Beginning in 2013, the MoCCA Arts Festival will be one of the Society’s signature public programs, with the mission of honoring the artists who are advancing the landscape of comics and illustration via a world-class festival emphasizing their achievements.

Anelle Miller, Executive Director of the Society of Illustrators, says, “It is a great privilege to welcome the incredibly dynamic creative community that exhibits at the MoCCA Arts Festival to the Society’s rich heritage. For more than a century, our mission has been to promote the art of illustration, and to appreciate its history and evolving nature through exhibitions, lectures and education. We are elated to host the MoCCA Arts Festival as a key component of that mission, and to honor its artists with the high caliber of exhibitions and recognition that are the Society’s trademark.”

In addition to continuing the Festival’s tradition of hosting an exhibit hall spotlighting comics’ leading edge creators, the MoCCA Arts Festival will now include a variety of new programs directly benefiting the artist and audience communities attending the shows, including:

• Juried awards recognizing the best work at the Festival with medal winners being honored with an exhibit at the Society’s headquarters, and finalists’ work archived in Columbia University’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library;
• A lavishly produced, large format souvenir journal that showcases the work of exhibiting artists;
• Discount entries for exhibiting artists in the Society’s Annual competition;
• Curated programming emphasizing the artistic achievements of the Festival’s creative community;
• An exhibition gallery of original comic and cartoon art curated by the Society’s professional staff;
• An onsite café featuring a full bar and menu as well as a lounge for networking.

The 2013 MoCCA Arts Festival is hosted by the Society of Illustrators, under the guidance of a Steering Committee that includes: Anelle Miller, Kate Feirtag, and Katie Blocher from the Society, as well as Leon Avelino (Secret Acres), Charles Brownstein (Comic Book Legal Defense Fund), Karen Green (Columbia University), William Hatzichristos (CollectorZoo), Paul Levitz (Writer/ Educator), Barry Matthews (Secret Acres), and Tucker Stone (Bergen Street Comics).

In the weeks to come, the Society will release more details about the 2013 Festival, including naming guests of honor, featured guests, the Festival jury, and much more.

The Beat Comic Reviews for 12/12/12: Batman Vs Vampires

Hey! It’s one of those dates where American readers can’t shout at me for getting the day and month the ‘wrong’ way round! Hurrah! That’s a relief.

This week was Dennis Hopeless Week, with the writer bringing two new Marvel launches to the world. I’ll be reviewing one of them – the controversy-bathing Avengers Arena - along with two vampire stories and, what the heck, the latest Batman. What better way to wash away all those scary night-loving monsters than with… a third scary night-loving monster. Hm.

This week I’ll be reviewing Batman #15, The Amazing Spider-Man 699.1, Marceline and the Scream Queens #6, and Avengers Arena #1

[Read more…]

A Matt Bors cartoon from AUGUST

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Tragically still relevant.

Bring in the Holidays with a SELFMADEHERO Giveaway!

2012 has been a spectacular year of releases for London’s SelfMadeHero. Ranging from the histrionic visionary account of the People’s Republic of China in A CHINESE LIFE to the triumphant return of SANDMAN alum Glyn Dillon in the breathtaking THE NAO OF BROWN, SelfMadeHero exemplifies the diverse breadth of the graphic novel medium. Their US distributors, the equally fabulous Abrams ComicArts, have kindly shared their holiday spirit by offering up a holiday giveaway package of five releases from this year. One lucky Beat reader can win this   incredible holiday giveaway by commenting below! [Read more…]

Before Watchmen and Solo get deluxe collections this summer

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DC also released their collection plans for the DCU for May-August, and they include FOUR deluxe editions collecting the various BEFORE WATCHMEN miniseries. Perhaps even more excitingly, a big collection rounding all of the excellent (and out of print) Solo artist spotlight books will be out in June. We seem to recall some of these ran into legal trouble, so maybe the contents won’t be complete?

Also, no more OG graphic novels, but LOTS of reprints of stuff, some long unseen.

DC Universe titles for May 2013:
 
AQUAMAN VOL. 1: THE TRENCH TP
Writer: Geoff Johns
Artists: Ivan Reis, Joe Prado and Eber Ferreira
Collects: AQUAMAN #1-6
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
AQUAMAN VOL. 2: THE OTHERS HC
Writer: Geoff Johns
Artists: Ivan Reis and Joe Prado
Collects: AQUAMAN #7-13
$22.99 US, 160 pg
 
THE AUTHORITY VOL. 1 HC
Writer: Warren Ellis
Artists: Bryan Hitch, Paul Neary,
Collects: THE AUTHORITY #1-12
$29.99 US, 296 pg
 
BATMAN BEYOND: 10,000 CLOWNS TP
Writer: Adam Beechen
Artist: Norm Breyfogle
Collects: Stories from BATMAN BEYOND UNLIMITED #1-8
$16.99 US, 176 pg
 
BATMAN, INCORPORATED VOL. 1: DEMON STAR HC
Writers: Grant Morrison and Chris Burnham
Artists: Chris Burnham and Frazer Irving
Collects: BATMAN, INCORPORATED #0-6
$24.99 US, 176 pg
 
DEMON KNIGHTS VOL. 2: THE AVALON TRAP TP
Writer: Paul Cornell
Artists: Bernard Chang, Diogenes Neves, Oclair Albert, Robson Rocha, Julio Ferreira and Dan Green
Collects: DEMON KNIGHTS #0 and 8-12
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
GRIFTER VOL. 2: NEW FOUND POWER TP
Writers: Rob Liefeld and Frank Tieri
Artists: Scott Clark, Dave Beaty, Marat Mychaels and Rob Hunter
Collects: GRIFTER #0 and 9-16
$16.99 US, 208 pg
 
THE JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA CHRONICLES VOL. 1 TP
Writer: Gardner Fox
Artist: Mike Sekowsky, Bernard Sachs, Joe Giella and Murphy Anderson
Collects: THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD #28-30 and JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #1-3
$14.99 US, 168 pg
 
JUSTICE LEAGUE BEYOND: KONSTRICTION TP
Writers: Derek Fridolfs and Dustin Nguyen
Artists: Dustin Nguyen and Derek Fridolfs
Collects: Stories from BATMAN BEYOND UNLIMITED #1-8
$16.99 US, 176 pg
 
LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES VOL. 2: THE DOMINATORS TP
Writer: Paul Levitz
Artists: Steve Lightle, Yildiray Cinar, Dan Green, Francis Portela, Andres Guinaldo, Tom Derenick and Scott Kolins
Collects: LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #0 and 8-14
$16.99 US, 192 pg
 
THE RAVAGERS VOL. 1: THE KIDS FROM N.O.W.H.E.R.E. TP
Writers: Howard Mackie, Tom DeFalco
Artists: Ian Churchill, Norm Rapmund, Jon Sibal, Tom Raney, Daniel Sampere, Stefano Martino, Julius Gopez, Scott Hanna and Tyler Kirkham
Collects: THE RAVAGERS #0-7
$16.99 US, 192 pg
 
SUPERMAN — ACTION COMICS VOL. 1: SUPERMAN AND THE MEN OF STEEL TP
Writers: Grant Morrison and Sholly Fisch
Artists: Rags Morales, Andy Kubert, Brent Anderson, Rick Bryant, Jesse Delperdang, Sean Parsons, Brad Walker and Chriscross
Collects: ACTION COMICS #1-8
$16.99 US, 256 pg
 
SUPERMAN — ACTION COMICS VOL. 2: BULLETPROOF HC
Writers: Grant Morrison, Sholly Fisch and Max Landis
Artists: Gene Ha, Cully Hamner, Ryan Sook, Rags Morales, Rick Bryant, CAFU, Ben Oliver and others
Collects: ACTION COMICS #0 and 9-12, and ACTION COMICS ANNUAL #1
$24.99 US, 224 pg
 
DC Universe titles for June 2013:
 
BATGIRL/ROBIN YEAR ONE TP
Writers: Chuck Dixon and Scott Beatty
Artists: Marcos Martin, Alvaro Lopez, Javier Pulido and Robert Campanella
Collects: BATGIRL YEAR ONE #1-9 and ROBIN YEAR ONE #1-4
$24.99 US, 424 pg
 
BATMAN AND ROBIN VOL. 1: BORN TO KILL TP
Writer: Peter J. Tomasi
Artists: Patrick Gleason and Mick Gray
Collects: BATMAN AND ROBIN #1-8
$16.99 US, 192 pg
 
BATMAN AND ROBIN VOL. 2: PEARL HC
Writer: Peter J. Tomasi
Artists: Patrick Gleason, Mick Gray, Lee Garbett, Andy Clarke, Ray McCarthy, Keith Champagne, Dustin Nguyen and Tomas Giorello
Collects: BATMAN AND ROBIN #9-14 and 0
$22.99 US, 160 pg
 
BATMAN NOIR: EDUARDO RISSO DELUXE EDITION HC
Writer: Brian Azzarello
Artist: Eduardo Risso
Collects: BATMAN #620-625, FLASHPOINT: BATMAN — KNIGHT OF VENGEANCE #1-3, the Batman stories from WEDNESDAY COMICS #1-12 and a story from BATMAN: GOTHAM KNIGHTS #8
$24.99 US, 224 pg
 
CATWOMAN VOL. 2: NO EASY WAY DOWN TP
Writer: Ed Brubaker
Artists: Brad Rader, Rick Burchett, Dan Davis, Mark Lipka, Cameron Stewart, Mike Manley, Javier Pulido, Guy Davis, Michael Avon Oeming, Paul Gulacy and Jimmy Palmiotti
Collects: CATWOMAN #10-24 and CATWOMAN SECRET FILES #1
$24.99 US, 400 pg
 
DEATHSTROKE VOL. 2: LOBO HUNT TP
Writers: Rob Liefeld and Joshua Williamson
Artists: Rob Liefeld, Eduardo Pansica, Mariah Benes,
Collects: DEATHSTROKE #0 and 9-14
 
THE FURY OF FIRESTORM: THE NUCLEAR MEN VOL. 2 — THE FIRESTORM PROTOCOLS TP
Writers: Ethan Van Sciver, Joe Harris
Artists: Ethan Van Sciver, Yildiray Cinar, Norm Rapmund, Marlo Alquiza, Daniel HDR and Walden Wong
Collects: THE FURY OF FIRESTORM: THE NUCLEAR MEN #0 and 7-12
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
HARLEY QUINN: NIGHT AND DAY TP
Writer: Karl Kesel
Artists: Terry Dodson, Rachel Dodson, Pete Woods, Mark Lipka, Aron Wiesenfled, Paul Grist, Paul Chadwick, Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti and Steve Lieber
Collects: HARLEY QUINN #8-13 and HARLEY QUINN: OUR WORLDS AT WAR #1
 
PHANTOM STRANGER VOL. 1: A STRANGER AMONG US TP
Writer: Dan DiDio
Artists: Brent Anderson, Scott Hanna and Philip Tan
Collects: PHANTOM STRANGER #0-5
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
RESURRECTION MAN VOL. 2: A MATTER OF DEATH AND LIFE TP
Writers: Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning
Artists: Fernando Dagnino, Andres Guinaldo, Jesus Saiz, Javier Pina and Ramon Bachs
Collects: RESURRECTION MAN #0 and 8-12
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
SHOWCASE PRESENTS: DC COMICS PRESENTS — SUPERMAN TEAM-UPS VOL. 2 TP
Writers: Marv Wolfman, Len Wein, Gerry Conway, Roy Thomas, Martin Pasko, Paul Levitz, Martin Pasko, Bob Rozakis, E. Nelson Bridwell, Paul Kupperberg, Dan Mishkin and Gary Cohn
Artists: Rich Buckler, Dave Hunt, Jim Starlin, Dick Giordano, Romeo Tanghal, Curt Swan, Vince Colletta, Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, Kurt Schaffenberger, Don Heck, Joe Staton, Bob Smith, Irv Novick, Frank McLaughlin, Alex Saviuk, Pablo Marcos and Mike DeCarlo
Collects: DC COMICS PRESENTS #27-50 and DC COMICS PRESENTS ANNUAL #1
$19.99 US, 520 pg
 
SOLO: THE DELUXE EDITION HC
Writers: Tim Sale, Darwyn Cooke, Diana Schutz, Jeph Loeb, Brian Azzarello, Richard Corben, John Arcudi, Paul Pope, Jack Kirby, Howard Chaykin, Joe Kelly, Andrew Helfer, Chuck Dixon, Michael Allred, Laura Allred, Lee Allred, Neil Gaiman, Steven T. Seagle, Scott Hampton, John Hitchcock, Damion Scott, Rob Markham, Jennifer Carcano, Sergio Aragones, Mark Evanier, Brendan McCarthy, Tom O’Connor, Jono Howard and Robbie Morrison
Artists: Tim Sale, Richard Corben, Paul Pope, Howard Chaykin, Darwyn Cooke, Jordi Bernet, Michael Allred, Teddy Kristiansen, Scott Hampton, Damion Scott, Sergio Aragones and Brendan McCarthy
Collects: SOLO #1-12
$49.99 US, 568 pg
 
STORMWATCH VOL. 1 TP
Writers: Warren Ellis
Artists: Tom Raney, Pete Woods, Michael Ryan, Jim Lee, Randy Elliott, Saleem Crawford and Richard Bennett
Collects: STORMWATCH #37-47
$19.99 US, 296 pg
 
STORMWATCH VOL. 2 HC
Writer: Warren Ellis
Artists: Tom Raney, Randy Elliott, Oscar Jimenez, Jason Gorder, Mark McKenna, Michael Ryan, Bryan Hitch, Paul Neary and others
Collects: STORMWATCH #48-49 and #1-11
$29.99 US, 384 pg
 
SUPERBOY VOL. 2: EXTRACTION TP
Writers: Scott Lobdell and Tom DeFalco
Artists: R.B. Silva, Iban Coello, Rob Lean, Sebastian Fiumara, Robson Rocha, Eduardo Pansica, Mariah Benes, Andy Owens, Brett Booth and Norm Rapmund
Collects: SUPERBOY #0 and 8-12 and TEEN TITANS #10
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
SUPERMAN: THE GOLDEN AGE OMNIBUS VOL. 1 HC
Writers: Jerry Siegel,
Artists: Joe Shuster, Jack Burnley, Paul Cassidy, Dennis Neville, Paul Lauretta and Wayne Boring
Collects: Stories from ACTION COMICS #1-31, NEW YORK WORLD’S FAIR #1, NEW YORK WORLD’S FAIR 1940, and SUPERMAN #1-7
$75.00 US, 784 pg
 
SWORD AND SORCERY VOL. 1: AMETHYST TP
Writer: Christy Marx
Artists: Aaron Lopresti
Collects: SWORD OF SORCERY #0-6
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
TEEN TITANS VOL 2: THE CULLING TP
Writers: Scott Lobdell and Fabian Nicieza
Artists: Ig Guara, JP Mayer, Brett Booth, Norm Rapmund and Jorge Jimenez
Collects: TEEN TITANS #0 and 9-12 and DC COMICS PRESENTS #12
$16.99 US, 192 pg
 

DC Universe titles for July 2013:
 
BATMAN – THE DARK KNIGHT VOL. 1: KNIGHT TERRORS TP
Writers: David Finch, Paul Jenkins and Joe Harris
Artists: David Finch, Ed Benes and Richard Friend
Collects: BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT #1-9
$24.99 US, 208 pg
 
BATMAN – THE DARK KNIGHT VOL. 2: CYCLE OF VIOLENCE HC
Writer: Gregg Hurwitz
Artists: David Finch, Richard Friend, Mico Suayan and Juan Jose Ryp
Collects: BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT #0 and 10-15
$22.99 US, 160 pg
 
BEFORE WATCHMEN: MINUTEMEN/SILK SPECTRE DELUXE EDITION HC
Writers: Darwyn Cooke and Amanda Conner
Artists: Darwyn Cooke and Amanda Conner
Collects: BEFORE WATCHMEN: MINUTEMEN #1-6 and BEFORE WATCHMEN: SILK SPECTRE #1-4
$29.99 US, 264 pg
 
BEFORE WATCHMEN: COMEDIAN/RORSCHACH DELUXE EDITION HC
Writers: Brian Azzarello
Artists: J.G. Jones and Lee Bermejo
Collects: BEFORE WATCHMEN: COMEDIAN #1-6 and BEFORE WATCHMEN: RORSCHACH #1-4
$29.99 US, 256 pg
 
BEFORE WATCHMEN: NITE OWL/DR. MANHATTAN DELUXE EDITION HC
Writer: J. Michael Straczynski
Artists: Andy Kubert, Joe Kubert, Bill Sienkiewicz, Adam Hughes and Eduardo Risso
Collects: BEFORE WATCHMEN: NITE OWL #1-4, BEFORE WATCHMEN: DR. MANHATTAN #1-4 and BEFORE WATCHMEN: MOLOCH #1-2
$29.99 US, 264 pg
 
BEFORE WATCHMEN: OZYMANDIAS/CRIMSON CORSAIR DELUXE EDITION HC
Writer: Len Wein
Artists: Jae Lee, John Higgins and Steve Rude
Collects: BEFORE WATCHMEN: OZYMANDIAS #1-4, BEFORE WATCHMEN: DOLLAR BILL #1 and the CRIMSON CORSAIR backup stories
$29.99 US, 256 pg
 
CAMELOT 3000 NEW EDITION TP
Writer: Mike W. Barr
Artists: Brian Bolland, Bruce Patterson, Dick Giordano and Terry Austin
Collects: CAMELOT 3000 #1-12
$19.99 US, 320 pg
 
GREEN LANTERN CORPS VOL. 1: FEARSOME TP
Writers: Peter J. Tomasi
Artists: Fernando Pasarin, Geraldo Borges and Scott Hanna
Collects: GREEN LANTERN CORPS #1-7
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
GREEN LANTERN CORPS VOL. 2: ALPHA WAR HC
Writer: Peter J. Tomasi
Artists: Fernando Pasarin, Scott Hanna and Marc Deering
Collects: GREEN LANTERN CORPS #0 and 8-12
$22.99 US, 144 pg
 
HE-MAN AND THE MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE VOL. 1 TP
Writers: James Robinson and Keith Giffen
Artists: Philip Tan, Ruy Jose, Lebeau Underwood, Howard Porter, Ruy Jose, Livesay,
Collects: HE-MAN AND THE MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE #1-6 and MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE Digital Chapter #1
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
JACK KIRBY’S O.M.A.C. – ONE MAN ARMY CORPS TP
Writer: Jack Kirby
Artists: Jack Kirby, D. Bruce Berry and Mike Royer
Collects: OMAC #1-8
$19.99 US, 176 pg
 
JUSTICE LEAGUE DARK VOL. 2: THE BOOKS OF MAGIC TP
Writers: Peter Milligan and Jeff Lemire
Artists: Daniel Sampere, Admira Wijaya, Mikel Janin, Lee Garbett, Cam Smith and Viktor Drujiniu
Collects: JUSTICE LEAGUE DARK #0 and 7-13 and JUSTICE LEAGUE DARK ANNUAL #1
$16.99 US, 224 pg
 
NIGHTWING VOL. 2: NIGHT OF THE OWLS TP
Writers: Kyle Higgins and Tom DeFalco
Artists: Eddy Barrows, Ruy Jose, Eber Ferreira, Andres Guinaldo, Geraldo Borges, Mark Irwin, Raul Fernandez,
Collects: NIGHTWING #0 and 8-12
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
SHOWCASE PRESENTS: THE UNKNOWN SOLDIER VOL. 2 TP
Writers: David Michelinie, Gerry Conway, Bob Haney and Robert Kanigher
Artists: Gerry Talaoc, Dick Ayers, Joe Kubert and Romeo Tanghal
Collects: STAR SPANGLED WAR STORIES #189-204 and UNKNOWN SOLDIER #205-219
$19.99 US, 592 pg
 
SUPERGIRL VOL. 2: GIRL IN THE WORLD TP
Writers: Michael Green and Mike Johnson
Artists: George Pérez, Bob Wiacek, Mahmud Asrar and Cam Smith
Collects: SUPERGIRL #0 and 8-12
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
SUPERMAN FAMILY ADVENTURES VOL. 1 TP
Writers: Art Baltazar and Franco
Artist: Art Baltazar
Collects: SUPERMAN FAMILY ADVENTURES #1-6
$12.99 US, 128 pg
 
SUPERMAN VOL. 1: WHAT PRICE TOMORROW? TP
Writers: George Pérez
Artists: George Pérez, Jesus Merino, Nicola Scott and Trevor Scott
Collects: SUPERMAN #1-6
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
SUPERMAN VOL. 2: SECRETS AND LIES HC
Writers: Dan Jurgens, Keith Giffen, Scott Lobdell and Fabian Nicieza
Artists: Dan Jurgens, Jesus Merino, Kenneth Rocafort, Pascal Alixe, Tom Raney, Vicente Cifuentes and Rob Hunter
Collects: SUPERMAN #7-12 and SUPERMAN ANNUAL #1
$24.99 US, 208 pg
 
SUPERMAN: THE PHANTOM ZONE TP
Writer: Steve Gerber
Artists: Gene Colan and Tony Dezuniga
Collects: PHANTOM ZONE #1-4 and DC COMICS PRESENTS 97
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
TEAM 7 VOL. 1: FIGHT FIRE WITH FIRE TP
Writer: Justin Jordan
Artists: Jesus Merino, Pascal Alixe, Norm Rapmund, Rob Hunter, Ron Frenz, Marlo Alquiza, Drew Geraci and Jose Marzan Jr.
Collects: TEAM 7 #0-7
$16.99 US, 192 pg
 
DC Universe titles for August 2013:
 
ABSOLUTE SUPERMAN/BATMAN VOL. 1 HC
Writer: Jeph Loeb
Artists: Ed McGuinness, Dexter Vines, Pat Lee and Michael Turner
Collects: SUPERMAN/BATMAN #1-13
$99.99 US, 336 pg
 
BATMAN ILLUSTRATED BY NEAL ADAMS VOL. 3 TP
Writers: Dennis O’Neil, Neal Adams, Len Wein and Frank Robbins
Artists: Neal Adams, Dick Giordano
Collects: BATMAN #232, 234-241, 243-246, 251 and 255, BATMAN ANNUAL #14, THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD #99, DETECTIVE COMICS #412-422, 439 and 600 and more
$24.99 US, 280 pg
 
BATMAN: ARKHAM UNHINGED VOL. 1 TP
Writers: Marly Halpern-Glaser, Paul Crocker, Sefton Hill, Derek Fridolfs and Paul Dini
Artists: Mike S. Miller, Simon Coleby, Pete Wood, Brian Ching, Livesay, Bruno Redondo, Brandon Badeaux, Al Barrionuevo, Michel Lacombe, Juan Jose Ryp,
Collects: BATMAN: ARKHAM UNHINGED #1-5
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
BATMAN: ARKHAM UNHINGED VOL. 2 HC
Writer: Derek Fridolfs
Artists: Jorge Jimenez, Mike S. Miller, Darick Robertson, Richard P. Clark, Peter Nguyen, Craig Yeung, Bruno Redondo and David Lopez
Collects: BATMAN: ARKHAM UNHINGED #6-10
$22.99 US, 160 pg
 
CAPTAIN ATOM VOL. 2: GENESIS TP
Writer: J.T. Krul
Artist: Freddie E. Williams II
Collects: CAPTAIN ATOM #0 and 7-12
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
THE CAPTAIN COMET ARCHIVES VOL. 1
Writers: John Broome, Gerry Conway, David Kraft and Bob Rozakis
Artists: Carmine Infantino, Bernard Sachs, Murphy Anderson, Sy Barry, Joe Giella, Gil Kane, Pablo Marcos, Bob Smith, Vince Colletta, Ernie Chan, Rich Buckler and Bob Layton
Collects: STRANGE ADVENTURES #9-44, 46 and 49, and SECRET SOCIETY OF SUPER-VILLAINS #2-6
$75.00 US, 416 pg
 
DC UNIVERSE PRESENTS VOL. 2: VANDAL SAVAGE TP
Writers: James Robinson, Fabian Nicieza, Dan DiDio, Rob Liefeld and Tony Bedard
Artists: Bernard Chang, Jorge Jimenez, Keith Giffen, Scott Koblish, Tom Derenick, Marat Mychaels, Carlos Rodriguez, Bit and Scott McDaniel
Collects: DC UNIVERSE PRESENTS #0 and 9-12
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
THE FLASH VOL. 1: MOVE FORWARD TP
Writers: Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato
Artist: Francis Manapul
Collects: THE FLASH #1-8
$16.99 US, 168 pg
 
THE FLASH VOL. 2: ROGUES REVOLUTION HC
Writers: Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato
Artists: Francis Manapul, Wes Craig, Diogenes Neves, Scott Kolins, Marcus To and Marcio Takara
Collects: THE FLASH #0, 9-12 and THE FLASH ANNUAL #1
$22.99 US, 160 pg
 
GREEN LANTERN: NEW GUARDIANS VOL. 1: THE RING BEARER TP
Writer: Tony Bedard
Artists: Tyler Kirkham, Batt and Harvey Tolibao
Collects: GREEN LANTERN: NEW GUARDIANS #1-7
$24.99 US, 328 pg
 
GREEN LANTERN: NEW GUARDIANS VOL. 2: BEYOND HOPE HC
Writer: Tony Bedard
Artists: Tyler Kirkham, Batt, Tomas Giorello and Marcio Takara
Collects: GREEN LANTERN: NEW GUARDIANS #8-12 and BLUE BEETLE #9
$24.99 US, 328 pg
 
GREEN LANTERN: SECTOR 2814 VOL. 2 TP
Writers: Len Wein, Steve Englehart and Paul Kupperberg
Artists: Dave Gibbons, Mark Farmer, Joe Staton, Mike DeCarlo, Bill Willingham, Rich Rankin and Bruce Patterson
Collects: GREEN LANTERN #182-183 and 185-189
$16.99 US, 232 pg
 
IN THE DAYS OF THE MOB HC
Writer: Jack Kirby
Artists: Vince Colletta and Mike Royer
Collects: IN THE DAYS OF THE MOB #1 and stories from AMAZING WORLD OF DC COMICS #1 and 10
$29.99 US, 80 pg
 
LEGION LOST VOL. 2: THE CULLING TP
Writer: Tom DeFalco
Artists: Aaron Kuder, Pete Woods, Andres Guinaldo and Mark Irwin
Collects: LEGION LOST #0 and 8-16
$16.99 US, 224 pg
 
LOT 13 TP
Writer: Steve Nile
Artist: Glenn Fabry
Collects: LOT 13 #1-6
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
NIGHTWING: OLD FRIENDS, NEW ENEMIES TP
Writers: Marv Wolfman, Cheri Wilkerson and Dan Mishkin
Artists: Chuck Patton, Tom Poston, Tom Mandrake, Vince Giarrano, Erik Larsen and Mike DeCarlo
Collects: SECRET ORIGINS #13 and stories from ACTION COMICS WEEKLY #613-618 and 627-634
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS VOL. 2: THE STARFIRE TP
Writer: Scott Lobdell
Artists: Kenneth Rocafort, Ario Anindito, Timothy Green II, Pasqual Ferry, Ig Guara, Brett Booth and Pascal Alixe
Collects: RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS #8-14
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
THE SAVAGE HAWKMAN VOL. 2: WANTED TP
Writers: Rob Liefeld, Mark Poulton and Frank Tieri
Artists: Joe Bennett, Art Thibert, Jack Jadson and Wayne Faucher
Collects: THE SAVAGE HAWKMAN #0 and 9-14
$19.99 US, 208 pg
 
SHOWCASE PRESENTS: JONAH HEX VOL. 2 TP
Writers: Michael Fleischer and David Michelinie
Artists: George Moliterni, Bill Draut, Luis Dominguez, Rich Buckler, Frank Springer, Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, Romeo Tanghal, Ernie Chan, Noly Panaligan, Vicente Alcazar, Danny Bulanadi, Rich Buckler, Dick Giordano, Val Mayerik,
Collects: WEIRD WESTERN TALES #34-38 and JONAH HEX #1-22
$19.99 US, 544 pg
 
SMALLVILLE SEASON 11 VOL. 2: DETECTIVE TP
Writer: Bryan Q. Miller
Artist: Chriscross, Jamal Igle and Marc Deering
Collects: SMALLVILLE SEASON 11 #5-8
$14.99 US, 144 pg
 
TALON VOL. 1: SCOURGE OF THE OWLS HC
Writers: Scott Snyder and James Tynion IV
Artists: Guillem March and Juan Jose Ryp
Collects: TALON #0-7
$24.99 US, 192 pg
 

Image and retailers: one retailer speaks out

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[As part of expanding our coverage on the business end of things, we reached out to one of our retail correspondents on the Image second printing matter, who responded with this.]

What a difference a day makes, and more importantly it seems that at least one publisher has decided to listen to the people who put their product directly into people’s hands on a daily basis. Just a day after the abrasive tone to retailers saying that there would be no more second printings, Image has rescinded their position, albeit slightly.

We love Image Comics, don’t get us wrong. They have done some INCREDIBLE things for retailers recently. One of our favorites is that for some titles, if you order a specific amount they will allow all the copies to be made returnable. That way we can order a healthy amount of a new series without feeling we are being overly committed. It allows us to keep a nice amount on the shelf and give it as much exposure as possible. We don’t know how well this strategy has worked for Image but we hope it has been profitable.

What a lot of people, and mainly publishers, forget is that retailers have to play the role of a fortune teller every month. When a new book comes out we have to, essentially, guess how popular it’s going to be. Sometimes we get it right, sometimes it goes horribly wrong. It’s part of the business. But punishing a retailer (and ultimately the consumer) by not offering a second printing for key titles when that initial run has sold out is ridiculous. It’s not our job to get the printing numbers right, it’s the publisher’s.

We, and many other retailers, use a point of sales system that tracks our sale trends. It’s a life saver to say the least (and if you are a retailer that doesn’t use one, we highly suggest rethinking that strategy). We will use those sales numbers as a basis when ordering following issues. Usually this works pretty well. But, say a book starts to gain in popularity; you’re hand selling it like crazy, the trade is a huge hit and people want to catch up, etc. These will all lead to new readers. We try to account for that sort of thing but we can only do so much.

For most books we won’t order a ton of extra copies in the hopes that they’ll eventually sell. We do what we can based on our data and ultimately if we over order, we’re the ones who pay the price. Image is a business too, we get that, but not allowing second printings for certain books will not lead to a heavy increase in initial orders, we guarantee it. It’s ultimately a lose-lose. If you feel like a particular issue is going to be huge and you think we should order more then get on the phone or send us an e-mail, we’ll listen. We will take all the help we can get when it comes to ordering.


BTW, just to round things out, Here’s Image creator Nick Spencer’s explanation of why second printings are an expensive proposition from a creator’s viewpoint:

What’s getting lost here is the good news– this past year, we’ve seen the needle move significantly in terms of the sales of creator-owned books. There is a positive, fast-moving trend-line here, and it says if you produce quality, original work, you can find a home in the current marketplace. That’s something we should all be celebrating right now, and something I’m very thankful to our retail community for.

Now, that said, I worry this conversation is devolving into finger-pointing: “You’re not ordering enough,” versus “You’re not printing enough.” And both sides have cases to make. However, I’d point out that some folks aren’t quite grasping how the Image model works. The publisher isn’t the one taking the risk when it overprints– the creators are (at least for the most part). We get paid based on sales, after costs. More printing equals more costs. Significant costs. So upping print runs can mean working for free for years instead of months, and in some cases, not getting paid at all. That’s just not going to be feasible for most creators.

So let’s be sure to be fair about who’s being asked to do what in this instance. And it gets more complicated than that. You’re asking the creator to overprint, but they have no control over the sales, end of the day. For instance, Creator A says, my trade is coming out, but orders are down on the single issue that comes out a week later. Should they overprint? We all do, by 10-20 percent, but more? Well, you’re making not one but two leaps of faith there– one is that you’re right about the consumer demand. Fine, we believe in the work, go for it. But the second is that x number of retailers will go back and re-order when their shelf copies run out. This is by no means a given. Plenty will just take the sell-through and move on. That’s a very scary risk, and remember, you’re taking it 1000 or so times, because you’re not assuming it for one retailer, you’re assuming it for all of them.
And that’s maybe the most important part, which is the risk mitigation. For a retailer, let’s say there are two dozen, maybe three dozen creator-owned single issue books you might be under-ordering on by a handful of copies– the shelf copies are gone, a couple people have asked about it, etc. Now, don’t get me wrong, I know that’s a very real, dollar amount risk, upping the numbers there. But it’s also done within the context of a broader inventory that you’ve designed by nature to absorb some risk– no one gets their orders right all the time, obviously. It’s done with additional options in reserve to at least recoup some potential loss– discounts, dollar bins, buy two get one free deals, etc.

For the creator, however– this one book might very well be all they have. There is no broader base to absorb the loss if one is incurred. There’s no backup plan, and again, you’re doing it in huge, huge numbers. It’s the difference between playing a couple chips and going all in.

Which is, again, not to minimize the difficult spot the retailer is in. I mean, that’s what this all really comes down to– I’ve worked with too many great retailers to think any numbers drop on a book comes from malice, laziness, or ineptitude. It comes from everyone involved having very tough decisions to make with their very limited resources. I’m just trying to explain, from my perspective, why 50 percent overprints are not happening. The risk simply can’t be taken or absorbed by the creators– the books, and this model even, would simply cease to exist, end of story. That much I am absolutely certain of.

But there’s a second part to this that I suspect is far, far more important. I have always approached creator-owned work with the primary goal being to create something that’s lasting, and sustainable, for years. That means lots of things: no fill-in, inconsistent art. The story is the number of pages it needs to be. Double-sized first issues at standard cover, with 99 cent reprints and free digital samplers. $9.99 first trades with a lot of pages. These things are big-time loss leaders. We do them because the goal is not to grab cash, slump, cancel, and relaunch/do something else. We’re playing a long game, and try to do things that help retailers build a consistent, long-lasting product for their shelves.

The simple reality, though, is the market is not really built around books that take this approach. All the focus is put on first issues, first arcs– big, quick returns. Most comics are published with this mind, but many Image books aren’t. And when you apply the ordering patterns of a “sprinter” book to a “marathon” book, well– it doesn’t usually serve you well on the latter. Cutting orders after a skip month sends a message that it would be better to do a fill-in; but we all know that, long-run, those fill-ins will stand out and detract from the overall book and the collections, having negative sales impacts long term. Not upping (or even cutting) orders after a trade release means the book is on a dangerous path to becoming a collection-only purchase, rather than using the trade to move readers over to singles.

The bottom line is the ordering pattern, the marketing approach, the pricing, the schedule– it really does differ depending on what your goals are in terms of the lifespan of the work. And this something that we all– retailers, publishers, and creators need to talk about, because it cuts to the core of what we’re making and selling. Are we pushing out disposable, flash in the pan impulse buys, or are we trying to build stories that can last for years? My sincere hope is that we continue to see more of the latter, but making that happen will require new ideas and new solutions so that we’re in all the best position possible to serve our customers and our readers.

Studio Coffee Run: Arrow, Man of Steel, Iron Man 3, etc.

Image via SuperHero Hype

Christopher Nolan can’t talk about Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s rumored appearance (which has already been completely and totally denied by JGL’s peoples) in Man of Steel as The Bat. And while we are on the subject of Man of Steel, I am just going to assume that you saw the trailer that everyone went frikkin’ batsh*t over this week. [Read more…]

So what’s up at Vertigo, anyway? A Sandman Omnibus for one thing.

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When it was announced that executive editor Karen Berger was stepping down last week, articles on the Vertigo imprint immediately took on an elegiac tone—even though official DC press outlets insisted that the line was not going any where. Everyone seemed to be projecting their own anxieties onto the line’s fate. Now, an ICv2 interview with John Cunningham and Bob Wayne has offered the most direct appraisal of where Vertigo is Vertigoing:

Cunningham:  When we look at Vertigo as part of DC, the buzzword would be that it’s one of our cornerstones.  I think everyone knows that Vertigo has been DC’s home for cutting edge and critically acclaimed stories and I don’t see that changing at any time in 2013 or beyond.  If fact, if you go back to San Diego and New York and look at announcements for projects that are coming out for 2013 we announced things as wide across the spectrum as the new Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy’s The Wake, a new Jeff Lamire series, Trillium, of course Neil Gaiman returning to Sandman, aside from the continuing volumes of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and the multitude of Fables products.  We’ve also seen in the past couple of weeks, as we’ve done slate planning for 2013, a lot of other new series coming from Vertigo that we’ll be announcing shortly. 
 
The industry as a whole and DC as a whole will miss Karen [Berger].  She’s been a tremendous and almost unprecedented contributor over the years, but I think we have enough good, high-quality Vertigo product in the pipeline to keep Vertigo readers happy for the near-term future. 
 
Is there a change in the mix of Vertigo ongoing series, miniseries, and OGNs?
Wayne:  We’re always adjusting and looking at that type of mix in both the DC Comics imprint and the Vertigo imprint.  A lot of it just comes down to the lead times on various projects and what kind of stories the creative contributors are wanting to tell, if they think their story needs to be a limited series or if they want to go with a larger unlimited palette.  There are a lot of things coming up.  Karen is assisting in the transition to new leadership within the imprint as part of her departure and part of securing her legacy with us.  We’ll be talking about Vertigo and Karen a lot more in the next few months.  I think you’ll be seeing additional Vertigo projects coming up.  There’s no reason for the readers to be too anxious.


Well, speaking of that, DC also released Vertigo’s book schedule for May-August, and you can see it below. A highlight is yet another format for the Sandman series—this time the big, fat omnibus. Evidently it will be released in two volumes. Grant Morrison’s ANIMAL MAN is also getting the omnibus treatment.

Most of the titles in the below list are reprints and paperback editions of previous hardcovers. No new original graphic novels, and the only collected editions of new series coming out are SWEET TOOTH, HELLBLAZER, SAUCER COUNTRY, and FAIREST. There’s also the collected DJANGO UNCHAINED, and the second volume of the GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO adaptation, and if you squint a little, this switch to licensed properties would seem to indicate at least one direction for Vertigo.

But we’re also hearing that a call for pitches has gone out and new projects are very much on the way from Vertigo. So…evolving.

Here’s the upcoming books lineup:

Vertigo titles for May 2013:
 
GET JIRO! TP
Writers: Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose
Artist: Langdon Foss
Original graphic novel
$14.99 US, 160 pg
 
THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO BOOK 2 HC
Writer: Denise Mina
Artists: Leonardo Manco and Andrea Mutti
Original graphic novel
$19.99 US, 144 pg
 
SHOOTERS TP
Writers: Eric Trautmann and Brandon Jerwa
Artists: Steve Lieber
Original graphic novel
$16.99 US, 144 pg
 
Vertigo titles for June 2013:
 
THE ANNOTATED SANDMAN VOL. 3 HC
Writer: Neil Gaiman
Commentary: Leslie Klinger
Artists: Jill Thompson, Vince Locke, P. Craig Russell, Bryan Talbot, Mark Buckingham, Alec Stevens, John Watkiss, Michael Zulli, Dick Giordano, Michael Allred, Shea Anton Pensa, Gary Amaro, Steve Leialoha, Tony Harris and Kent Williams
Collects: THE SANDMAN #40-56, THE SANDMAN SPECIAL #1 and stories from VERTIGO PREVIEW #1 and VERTIGO: WINTER’S EDGE #3
$49.99 US, 520 pg
 
DJANGO UNCHAINED HC
Writer: Django Tarantino
Artists: R.M. Guera and Jason Latour
Collects: DJANGO UNCHAINED #1-6
$24.99 US, 244 pg
 
GONE TO AMERIKAY TP
Writer: Derek McCullough
Artist: Colleen Doran
Original graphic novel
$16.99 US, 144 pg
 
LUCIFER BOOK 1 TP
Writer: Mike Carey
Artists: Scott Hampton, Chris Weston, James Hodgkins, Warren Pleece, Dean Ormston, Peter Gross and Ryan Kelly
Collects: THE SANDMAN PRESENTS: LUCIFER #1-3 and LUCIFER #1-13 
$29.99 US, 392 pg
 
PREACHER BOOK ONE TP
Writer: Garth Ennis
Artist: Steve Dillon
Collects: PREACHER #1-12
$19.99 US, 352 pg
 
SWEET TOOTH VOL. 6: WILD GAME TP
Writer/artist: Jeff Lemire
Collects: SWEET TOOTH #33-40
$16.99 US, 200 pg
 
Vertigo titles for July 2013:
 
HELLBLAZER: DEATH AND CIGARETTES TP
Writer: Peter Milligan
Artists: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Stefano Landini and Simon Bisley
Collects: HELLBLAZER #292-300 and HELLBLAZER ANNUAL #1
$16.99 US, 176 pg
 
BLACK ORCHID TP NEW EDITION
Writer: Neil Gaiman
Artist: Dave McKean
Collects: BLACK ORCHID #1-3
$16.99 US, 176 pg
 
FAIREST VOL. 2: HIDDEN KINGDOM TP
Writer: Lauren Beukes
Artist: Inaki Miranda
Collects: FAIREST #8-14
$14.99 US, 128 pg
 
SAGA OF THE SWAMP THING BOOK FOUR TP
Writer: Alan Moore
Artists: Stephen Bissette, John Totleben, Rick Veitch, Ron Randall, Alfredo Alcala and others 
Collects: SWAMP THING #43-50
$19.99 US, 224 pg
 
SAUCER COUNTRY VOL. 2: THE RETICULAN CANDIDATE TP
Writer: Paul Cornell
Artists: Ryan Kelly and Mirko Colak
Collects: SAUCER COUNTRY #7-12
$14.99 US, 176 pg
 
Vertigo titles for August 2013:
 
THE ANIMAL MAN OMNIBUS
Writer: Grant Morrison
Artists: Chaz Truog, Doug Hazlewood, Tom Grummett, Mark McKenna, Steve Montano, Paris Cullins, Mark Farmer,
Collects: ANIMAL MAN #1-26 and SECRET ORIGINS #39
$75.00 US, 704 pg
 
BEWARE THE CREEPER TP
Writer: Jason Hall
Artist: Cliff Chiang
Collects: BEWARE THE CREEPER #1-5
$14.99 US, 128 pg
 
RIGHT STATE TP
Writer: Mat Johnson
Artist: Andrea Mutti
Original graphic novel
$16.99 US, 144 pg
 
THE SANDMAN OMNIBUS VOL. 1
Writer: Neil Gaiman
Artist: Sam Kieth, Mike Dringenberg, Malcolm Jones III, Chris Bachalo, Michael Zulli, Steve Parkhouse, Kelley Jones, Charles Vess, Colleen Doran, Matt Wagner, Hugo Pratt, Dick Giordano, Stan Woch, Bryan Talbot, Shawn McManus and Mark Buckingham
Collects: THE SANDMAN #1-37 and THE SANDMAN SPECIAL #1
$125.00 US, 1,040 pg

Chicago Comics damaged in bar crawl brawl

The mean streets of the Windy City took a toll on the storefront of well known comics shop Chicago Comics when a holiday bar crawl turned into a brawl.

On Saturday night, revelers in the Twelve Bars of Christmas pub crawl launched a row in front of Chicago Comics that left the front window smashed and a neon sign damaged as two men in holiday garb squabbled over a pot-themed ashtray. Chicago Comics Eric Kirsammer is asking TBOX, as it’s known, organizers to pay the $1000 in damages.

The cost to replace the window and repair the sign—more than $1,000—represents an estimated five percent rise in this month’s business costs, said Eric Kirsammer, the store’s owner.

The insurance deductible is $1,000, meaning Kirsammer would have to cover the bulk of the cost if he files a claim. And if he does, his premiums will rise.

“It’s a big expense,” Kirsammer said. “Bookstores are not high-margin businesses.”


The event in question is not just a few buddies wandering around getting hammered, but a huge milling crowd of more than 40,000 people wandering around getting hammered: some 25,000 tickets were sold for the crawl, meaning organizers may have netted as much as $1 million in ticket sales.

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Chicago Comics is well-known as one of the finest stores in an area blessed with many great comics shops, with a particular emphasis on the indie side of things—it’s a sister store of the famed indie bookstore Quimby’s. More pictures of the damage were posted on the store’s Facebook page with the caption

Thanks, TBOX!

Wrigleyville Strikes Again: Some drunk dude put another drunk dude’s head through our window. Class act, guys. Everyone’s okay though! Even the one who dove through our storefront, surprisingly!


Although ugly, this was not the most violent event of TBOX—elsewhere, a fellow was stabbed in the neck with a broken beer bottle, resulting in a “Friday the 13th” type scene. Ah, holidays.

Kibbles ‘n’ Bits, 12/14/12: Don’t mess with the Oatmeal

§ If you were playing along on the Moore/Morrison stuff and can stand ONE MORE LINK, this piece on Moore, Morrison, Supergods by Emmet O’Cuana provides a fine coda.

§ DO NOT mess with The Oatmeal.

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§ This piece on actors who have appeared in more than one comic book movie proved that I was not crazy when I thought that Sam Elliott had played the role of Older White Man Antagonist in two different Marvel movies: The Hulk and Ghost Rider. Can Jeff Bridges also double dip?

§ A nice piece on sometime Beat contributor Amy Chu and her Alpha Girl Comics :

“My parents moved to Edmond, Oklahoma from Iowa just after my high school graduation, so I spent summers and Christmas in Edmond,” Chu said. “My dad is still there. I love going back every year to get my BBQ and strawberry cake from Leo’s and to visit the National Cowboy Museum.” Chu’s Alpha Girl Comics began as a project with director and writer Georgia Lee. Their goal is to get new audiences, especially women and girls, into reading and making comics. “Part of our focus is to write great stories with strong and realistic roles for girls and women,” Chu said. “We’re not shy about saying that, and we’ve gotten nothing great support from people within the comics community. Not all the stories are about women but we just feel like we need to represent.”

 

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§ The NY Times is promoting a call for kids to draw holiday comics via the CCS-based Adventures in Comics crew. James Sturm suggests that Hulk vs. Yoda (below) may be the culmination of the year’s efforts.

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§ MUST READING. There’s a sprawling interview with Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez up at TCJ, and the two great cartoonists are sometimes caught in the cranky mode that they have been known to affect, but most of it is laudatory:

Love and Rockets is a comics store that we grew up in — well, there weren’t comics stores; there were newsstands. But there’s a comic-book rack and there’s Blackhawk, Archie, My Love, and they were all comic books. It wasn’t like, “This is real comic books, and these are fake comic books” — no, they were all comic books. So we just take every subject we do in that way. Jaime did a superhero epic, that’s because that’s what comic books were. I’ll do a romantic story, soap opera thing, that’s what a comic book was, too. I’m not gonna do Westerns, ’cause I’m not interested in that. Same with war comics, we don’t do that stuff ’cause it’s just not what we’re into. I’ll read one, but they’re not that interesting to me, except for the Harvey Kurtzman ones.

 

§ Graeme McMillan gets all sad about The Changing Shape of Internet Fandom. It is true that once there were websites devoted to The Invisibles and Sandman and so on. Now we just argue about Image’s reprint policies.

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§ Zambry Films has optioned The Impostor’s Daughter a graphic novel by Laurie Sandell. This is a memoirish (“in the tradition of Fun Home!”) story of a woman who discovered her father wove a web of lies. It is not one of those movie comics about a hitman or a ghost hunter or whatever. It’s god to see other kinds of GNs optioned from time to time.

§ A radio show interview with Charles Burns!

Comics creator Charles Burns talks about The Hive, the second book in the trilogy he’s working on, the influence of Tintin, his work on Fear(s) of the Dark, and why comics appeal to him as a storytelling medium.

 

§ Jill Pantozzi has moved her Hey, That’s My Cape! column from Newsarama to IGN. For her first essay, she takes on that searing moment when you realize you don’t have to keep buying comics book you do not actually like.

So what did I do after Rucka’s speech? I sat down with my iPad (I’m fully digital now and still getting used to it) and gave serious thought to each title. Of the 33 titles I was reading, I decided to stop buying eight. And while it was a huge decision to make, once I did it, I wondered why I hadn’t done it sooner.

 

Jim Zub and Edwin Huang Launch ‘Savage Skullkickers’ in March

Following on from the success of Uncanny Skullkickers #1 next February, Image have announced the launch of a brand new #1 issue in March – Savage Skullkickers, from the creative team of Jim Zub and Edwin Huang.

[Read more…]