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Beat Staff

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The Beat Staff is an elite group of trained ninjas.

On the Scene: After Hours at Emerald City Comic Con

by @AmyChu Day 1 After an exciting first day at Emerald City Comic Con on Friday, a sea of attendees flooded the many downtown venues around...

Tilting at Windmills #221: Looking at BookScan: 2012

By Brian Hibbs (Originally published February 2013) “There are three kinds of lies: Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics” For the tenth (!) year in a row, I’m...

INTERVIEW: Kelly Sue DeConnick: Marvel and More

By Matt O'Keefe. Kelly Sue DeConnick is a relative newcomer to the Big Two, but that doesn't mean she hasn't been around. After years of adapting...

Working With Wacker: Steve Wacker on Helping Creators Make Comics

By Matt O'Keefe   For someone who describes himself as America's 14th favorite comic book editor, Steve Wacker has edited a lot of beloved books. I...

Alan Moore and Superfolks Part 3: The Strange Case of Grant...

by Pádraig Ó Méalóid Originally, when I set out to look into the various allegations about Alan Moore and Robert Mayer’s Superfolks, I thought it...

Interview: Karl Kerschl is Abominable

For over four years Karl Kerschl has been writing and drawing his award-winning The Abominable Charles Christopher, releasing a new strip every Wednesday. I spoke to him about singlehandedly writing, drawing, printing, and distributing his weekly webcomic and got teasers about upcoming projects. Warning: there are spoilers of Charles in the interview. You can read the entire story for free on the Abominable site.

Yes, There are Reasons for Dragons

Harboring a fierce desire to learn cartooning, in 2008 Chris Northrop moved to Los Angeles.  At a Starbucks one day, he was observed sketching...

Telling Stories at Archaia, Making Buddies at Dark Horse, and Pigging...

By Matt O’Keefe Nate Cosby rose through the ranks at Marvel to become editor of such critically acclaimed all-ages titles Franklin Richards: Son of a...

ComiCON-versation: Live (almost) Blogging Behind the Scenes at LBCHC 2012

by Mike Scigliano After having given some heavy insight into what exactly it takes to produce a well run comicon it's time to show you...

Kicking Skulls and Making A Name For Himself: Jim Zub on...

By Matt O'Keefe Jim Zubkavich has been creating comics since he began self-publishing Makeshift Miracle in 2001, but he really broke onto the scene in...

Alan Moore and Superfolks Part 1: The Case for the Prosecution

In 1977 Dial Press of New York published Robert Mayer’s first novel, Superfolks. It was, amongst other things, a story of a middle-aged man coming to terms with his life, an enormous collection of 1970s pop-culture references, some now lost to the mists of time, and a satire on certain aspects of the comic superhero, but would probably be largely unheard of these days if it wasn’t for the fact that it is regularly mentioned for its supposed influence on a young Alan Moore and his work, particularly on Watchmen, Marvelman, and his Superman story, Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? There’s also a suggestion that it had an influence on his proposal to DC Comics for the unpublished cross-company ‘event,’ Twilight of the Superheroes. But who’s saying these things, what are they saying, and is any of it actually true?

NYCC Six In Six: Mike Norton

by Matt O’Keefe Welcome to Six In Six, where I ask comic folk six questions and get my answers in six minutes or less. Here...