randy_reynaldo
Randy Reynaldo at San Diego 2016 Photo: Heidi MacDonald

Earlier this week, 2019 Eisner judge Chris Arrant took to Twitter asking comic creators to share tabling tips they’ve learned while at conventions. As there are ever more and more cons, and more and more sales and business done there, tabling has become an art and a science. And here are a few of the great responses that have been shared so far.

A common tip that has been shared is in regards to the set up and operation of one’s table:

https://twitter.com/tomfeister/status/1090456244131909633

Another common type of tip shared has been about the importance of audience engagement:

Tips regarding networking with other tabling creators while at a convention have also been popular:

As someone who attended their first convention last year, and got sick the week afterwards, I can definitely say some of these tips regarding self care are spot on:

Conventions aren’t just time for work, and creators expressed tips for when it comes to event parties:

Whether a convention veteran or rookie, in following these tips you’re sure to have a fantastic time while tabling.

3 COMMENTS

  1. Some great comments. Having sold our indie comic miniseries at several small conventions, I can add: be early to your table, so you can set up on time. Greet people who come to your table! Thank them for buying your comic! Bring a thermos of coffee and an insulated lunch bag. Take a break and walk around. Keep an eye on your stuff. Enjoy the day!

  2. Hey, man, thanks for the “shout out”/photo! Let me add my own two cents as a longtime Comic-Con exhibitor and one who is definitely on the shy side and not comfortable in self-promotion–while you don’t want to be too aggressive and turn off people, you also want to give people a chance to cut through the noise and notice you and perhaps take a look at your work. So even a simple hi/eye contact can make a difference, rather than just passively allowing people to walk by and waiting for them to stop. If they continue walking on, that’s fine, but if they stop, engage with them about how the show is going and of course ask if they’ve seen your work before and do a quick pitch! Don’t expect a 100% sell through rate, but even a simple connection like this can result in sales and even a friend/longterm fan/supporter down the line! You can never tell what will result in a connection like this!

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