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John Seven

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John Seven is a journalist and children's book writer living in North Adams, Massachusetts. His books include 'A Rule Is To Break: A Child's Guide To Anarchy,' 'Happy Punks 1-2-3,' 'Frankie Liked To Sing,' and others. He reviews comics for the Beat in his regular Indie Beat column. Find out about all his things at johnseven.me.

Review: The Red Drip Of Courage distills Stephen Crane to a...

You can go for years reading comics and come upon plenty of bizarre works, but at least understand where these are coming from. It’s...

Review: Kelly Froh & Dan Mazur’s two non-fiction delights

The Weekend Casserole Collection by Kelly Froh Froh brings together a number of short pieces from various sources — anthologies she’s contributed to, some of...

Review: Meags Fitzgerald continues her autobiographical innovations with Long Red Hair

In Meags Fitzgerald’s previous book, Photobooth: A Biography, which documented just about anything you ever wondered about photo booths, she went far beyond her...

Review: Two rich offerings in Nobrow’s 17 x 23 series

Nobrow Press’ 17 x 23 series highlights accomplished smaller works in a pleasing package that speaks to graphic novel consumers who might not seek...

Review: Whit Taylor’s Up Down Clown tackles mental health issues

The sad clown is a trope that has been well-used in every storytelling media there is, but Whit Taylor’s Up Down Clown from Ninth...

Review: The hilarious honesty of Jane Mai’s See You Next Tuesday

Jane Mai isn’t merely self-deprecating. That phrase doesn’t capture her at all. Actually, I don’t know what to call it instead, but it comes out...

Review: 750 Years In Paris offers details within the broad stroke...

Given the recent tragic events in Paris, Vincent Mahé’s absolutely stunning 750 Years In Paris is a sprawling reminder that this is not the...

Review: Baltic anthology š! #23 offers big art in a small...

The Balkan comics anthology š! from kuš! is one of the more challenging delights of the comics world, grafting the sensibility of a contemporary art gallery onto the comics page. It regularly presents challenging and edgy work, often abstract, but with enough show of personality that you can see these are the works of real humans, and it comes in a striking mini-digest format that evokes Little Big Books, adding to its appeal as an object to display.