Frank Miller, James Harvey, the art of coloring, the artists reputation and….a mystery

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The other day we told you about a Frank Miller DKIII variant cover that had everyone talking about its (depending on your point of view) minimalist and/or shockingly incompetent art style.

After some twitter discussion, artist James Harvey took it upon himself to show that Miller’s recent work might be suffering from a misplaced coloring esthetic.

And then all hell broke loose.

My book on Alfredo Alcala “won’t stop selling”

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Here’s a comprehensive interview with Dover’s Drew Ford about the future of their comics line, with many more reprints coming (including a personal favorite, Through the Habitrails). But a little gem is dropped that the book I wrote with Phil Yeh about Alfredo Alcala, Secret Teachings of a Comic Book Master has found an audience: […]

Must read: Todd Alcott on Star Wars The Force Awakens character arcs

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I know everyone is sick of The Force Awakens already, but if you have any interest left, the good news is that screenwriter Todd Alcott has returned to his blog to examine the character arcs of this movie, starting with Rey. And yeah, can’t wait for Kylo Ren. The major characters in The Force Awakens, like […]

SDCC ’15: FedEx Office is here to save the day

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Comic-Con is said to be the biggest pop culture event in North America, and if you’re one of the more than 130,000 attendees, you’re likely to purchase and wear some of one-of-a-kind comics, art and action figures from the many vendors at the show. Whether it’s a Optimus Prime collectible or a Boba Fett action figure or even your vintage Star Wars costume, keeping your Comic-Con treasures safe and sound doesn’t have to be difficult or expensive. And tese FedEx coupons just for Beat readers will help!

Nate Powell and Chris Ross on How They Designed ‘March’

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[Editor’s note: The release this week of March Book Two by Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell has already made headlines with its story of the fight for civil rights in the 60s, and the covers to both volumes have become iconic in their own right. The message of the courage to fight for equality for all in the face of violent opposition is as relevant and needed today as it was 50 years ago. But powerful images to cover powerful times don’t always spring up fully formed. Here Powell and Top Shelf designer Chris Ross with an in-depth breakdown of how they created these covers and combined imagery to capture both history and ideals.]

NATE: March was originally a single, massive volume, so the initial front and back covers were intended to house the entire narrative: the front introduced the basic visual theme of opposition, with two elements facing off against each other, though a contingent of riot-ready white supremacist police were prominently featured across the bottom. After some discussion with Chris Ross, Andrew Aydin, and Congressman Lewis, we all agreed that we should shift some of that focus to the folks on the front lines, and away from Jim Crow police forces. Around that time, we decided to release the saga as a trilogy, so Chris and I jumped in to further develop the oppositional themes, but playing with different angles and approaches to the cover’s division.