South Park finds yaoi, but Craig and Tweek have been an item for a long time


Some may have been perplexed by the “yaoi” element in last night’s South Park episode but it’s turns out that Trey Parker and Matt Stone were just ripping the lid off a long existing shocking secret about Craig and Tweek. Here’s the startling truth!

31 Days of Halloween: Kitaro by Shigeru Mizuki


So many Halloween comics are coming out this season. Here’s one that’s available as part of Halloween Comic Fest: BIRTH OF KITARO by Shigeru Mizuki, the origin story for Mizuki’s most popular character. Kitaro is a one eyed boy with strange powers—because he’s actually a 350-year-old yokai (spirit monster). While you may know Mizkui from […]

NYCC ’15: Attack on Titan gets massive new anthology by diverse creators


by Austin Lanari —

When “The Biggest Attack on Titan Manga Announcement Ever” panel was announced, including the likes of long-time and super-well-connected editor Jeanine Schaefer, the assumption was that some type of western comics homage to the best-selling Japanese manga was in the works. My personal guess was a miniseries or two from a couple of creators.

The reality is much bigger than that.

NYCC 15: Attack on Titan gets big announcement with some familiar names


Kodansha has released a teaser for their NYCC panel with artwork by Tomer Hanuka and it’s…awesome. Here’s the panel teaser: The Biggest Attack on Titan Manga Announcement Ever | New York Comic Con 2015: The Biggest Attack on Titan Manga Announcement Ever Thu. October 8| 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM | Room 1A18 Kodansha Comics, […]

“Death Note” Creators Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata Announce “Platinum’s End”


  You, me, and everyone into manga around 2006 should remember Death Note, the fantastic psychological thriller about a bored teenage genius outwitting the police and a reclusive detective as he reshapes the world one murder at a time.  Following the series’ conclusion, creators Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata went on to create the light-hearted Bakuman, […]

Weekly Shonen Jump and Kodansha join Comixology


Digital manga—more available than ever before. Both Weekly Shonen Jump and Kodansha have just joined Comixology and the Kindle store. The digital Weekly Shonen Jump makes such favorites as One Piece, Bleach, Blue Exorcist available on the same day as the Japanese release throughout North America, the U.K., Ireland, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. […]

Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto is finally leaving his house—and has two signings for NYCC


Masashi Kishimoto, creator of the 205,000,000 copies in print Naruto comic, will be making an extremely rare appearance at this year’s New York Comic Con with two special signings—one at Books Kinokuniya and one at the Tribeca outpost of Barnes and Noble. It’s not only Kishimoto-sensei’s first appearance in the US, it’s also his first con appearance ever. And probably one of the few times he’s left his house during the 18-year run of the international smash hit.

We’re kidding a little about the leaving the house bit, but as we’ve mentioned here many times in the past, manga creators can lead a pretty monastic lifestyle, even with the help of assistants. Since Naruto ended last year, he’s been busy with various manga about Boruto, Naruto’s son, and also writing the Naruto movie, but hopefully he’s been enjoying some time off.

Manga triumphalism—heck yeah!


As I’m probably too fond of saying, each year’s San Diego Comic-Con represents the end of comics’ fiscal year, and we’re now in a new cycle of sales, renewal and looking forward to the next thing. Although the con was not that memorable on its own, it did mark a new plateau in the direct sales era for comics penetration into the mass media, and for having a variety of voices and genres that the medium has probably has never been seen before.

This situation, while far from ideal, still represents a dream come true for a lot of us who have been toiling in the comics industry for a while. I remember as if it were yesterday sitting in various comics industry think tanks in the 90s wondering WHAT could be done to expand the audience for comics, how to bring in genres that weren’t superheroes, and how to overcome the tyranny of the “32 page pamphlet” as it was dubbed by either Kurt Busiek or Marv Wolfman, depending on who you ask. These tasks seemed daunting at the time, and it actually took 25 years to get to a place where it could be argued that its true, and everyone at those meetings is a certified old timer now.