Koyama Press Fall slate includes double DeForge, Mai, Wertz and more

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Canada’s Koyama Press continues to present a lively slate of boundary-pushing work, and this fall they are putting out their biggest line ever, including two books by Michael DeForge, new books by Jane Mai, Cole Closser and some newcomers, a kid’s book and a revamped version of Julia Wertz’s Drinking at the Movies. I expect one of the most interesting will be Robin Nishio’s Wailed which follows “a group of friends who also happen to be the vanguard of alternative comics making.” And you thought The Sponsor was shattering!

All the details below:

Julia Wertz on illegal pinball—and running her own crowdfunder

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Here’s a history comic on Newyorker.com by Julia Wertz about when pinball was illegal in New York City

In other Wertz news, she’s working on Impossible People, a memoir about her alcoholism that she started years ago and then abandoned. To fund it she’s running her own crowd funding effort, which you can support at the above link. Why her own thing?

Tonight to do: Julia Wertz and MariNaomi reading at Bergen Street

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The week between SPX and the Brooklyn Book Festival s usually crowded with events and this is no exception. Tonight, things kick off at Bergen Stree Comics with A Live Reading with Julia Wertz and MariNaomi!:

Julia Wertz to debut new mini at SPX

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ollowing the hilarity of Fart Party and the hilarity tinged with self-examination of Drinking at the Movies and The Infinite Wait, cartoonist Julia Wertz proved herself one of the sharpest observers out there. However she’s been in hiatus from making new comics for the last two years, while getting a new reputation as an urban explorer. (If you want creepy, follow Wertz on Instagram.)

Julia Wertz on alcoholism, cartooning and life

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The hysterically funny Julia Wertz hasn’t been cartooning as much lately, as she deals with staying sober and improving her life. Over at Narrative, she writes with humor about her ups and downs and shares some her private diary comics.

Kibbles ‘n’ Bits, 12/6/13: Lonely Superman

§ The DC Comics blog actually marshals the evidence for why Superman is lonely: building robot friends, putting a cape on his dog, that kind of thing. § I stayed the hell away from that Sound of Music thing last night. WHY. § And yet I’m intrigued by the first picture of Quvenzhané Wallis as […]

24 Hours of Halloween: Julia Wertz’s photos of abandoned asylums

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You may know Julia Wertz as the hilarious cartoonist behind The Infinite Wait and Other Stories, The Fart Pary and many other books. but she also has a thriving hobby in urban exploring: going into abandoned buildings and photographing them. You can find examples on her Flickr stream and amazing galleries on her website. In […]

Review: The Infinite Wait by Julia Wertz: bio, booze and books

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The Infinite Wait by Julia Wertz Koyama Press I have a complicated and knotty relationship with auto-bio comics, beset by apprehension and cynicism. There’s no doubt the genre produces some interesting material- Art Spiegelman, Seth, Robert Crumb, to name but a few, but more recently I’ve found a lot of it to be, quite frankly, boring. The […]

Shopping Guide: Julia Wertz on Etsy

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Cartoonist Julia Wertz (Fart Party, The Infinite Wait and Other Stories) has just launched Julia’s Junk Shop on Etsy, and if you are looking for gifts for that certain someone, you might find something here. besides Wertz’s own very funny books, there is jewelry made of Peanuts, earrings made of sea glass, and many other […]

King Con: the report

In the runup to King Con, the Brooklyn-based comics show held at the Lyceum in Park Slope this weekend, it was asked many times, “Do we NEED another New York comics show?” Starting with the Big Apple Con back on October 1, running through New York Comic Con the next week and on to the Brooklyn Comics and Graphic Fest on December 4, King Con made a total of four cons in three months, not really a heavy workload for a comics town as huge as NYC, but definitely a strain on the wallets of attendees, especially after the NYCC epic. (New York’s fifth show is MoCCA Fest in April.) So from the outset you have a show with big questions hanging over it.

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Friends had asked me to come out for various events and I was slotted for the Kids Comics panel on Sunday morning so I ended up going out on three out of four days. What I saw was a scene with enough energy to overcome a lot of logistical mistakes and misconceptions to still create a fun and informative afternoon activity. But it didn’t answer the fundamental question of what King Con’s mission should be.