CrowdWatch: Locust Moon to publish long lost Will Eisner comic strips


Well speak of the devil, here’s a new Kickstarter from the Locust Moon folks that plans to reprint some long lost early work by Will Eisner. The story of how it came to light is one of the craziest things I’ve ever heard: A collector outside Philly discovered 104 zinc plates engraved with work that […]

So who REALLY created the graphic novel?


Will Eisner: Champion of the Graphic Novel is a new book by former DC publisher Paul Levitz that looks at Eisner’s historical contribution to comics. And New York magazine has just excerpted the chapter in which Levitz discusses how and why Eisner is credited with being the midwife of the graphic novel form. Of course […]

Revolutionary new comics insert in newspapers spotlights King Freatures


The New York Times, which is the one newspaper that never ran comics strips, reverse engineers their insertion into Sunday papers as something of a novelty, instead of an elegy to the death of the newspaper itself. The occasion is a piece on a special 16 page color comics insert spotlighting the 100th anniversary of […]

RIP Murphy Anderson


Word going around on Facebook that master inker and comics technical innovator Murphy Anderson has passed away at age 89. Anderson was one of the great DC inkers of all time, providing crisp clean lines that defined the look of Hawkman, Superman, and Adam Strange, and, indeed, the whole DC line of the Silver Age, inking over Carmine Infantino, Gil Kane and most notably, Curt Swan. He was inducted into the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame (precursor of the Eisner HoF) all the way back in 1988, a tribute to his statue in the industry.

A short film about Reid Fleming, the World’s Toughest Milkman has much to teach us


Reid Fleming and David Boswell are two of the great legendary figures of the 80s black and white comics boom – Canadian born cartoonist Boswell created an enduring character in the irascible delivery man Reid Fleming whose bellicose shouts — “I thought I told you to shut up!” — and hostile approach to dairy deposits made him an angry everyman hero. The character became incredibly popular during its ’80s run, and a big studio movie was contemplated, with Boswell writing the script, until the project reached a film exec who didn’t get the unique, absurd humor of the comic. The rest, as they say, is a cartoonist’s life.

How a toxic history of harassment has damaged the comics industry


At the recently concluded Small Press Expo in Bethesda a very cool thing happened. A bunch of awards were presented to several talented, unique cartoonists who are turning out though provoking, beautifully crafted work, influential work. The winners were all popular and well deserved. And they all happened to be women. It was a thing, for sure, and much talked about. What struck me, first off, was just how strong the work was–Sophie Goldstein’s multi leveled future history of a world where having a baby became a rebellious act, Emily Carroll’s mastery of horror and structure, Eleanor Davis’s powerful examination of self-sabotaging quests for self-esteem in many settings.

The other thing that struck me was the contrast with the other conversations I was having at the show. Talking with people I used to work with in the “mainstream” comics industry about the long lists of men who would never have given Goldstein, Carroll or Davis a shot at telling their stories. Because they are women, and those people didn’t think women could make good comics.

Peter Bagge’s Founding Fathers Funnies coming from Dark Horse


Peter Bagge is prolific and hilarious, a very good combination in a cartoonist. He’s been running short one page historical comic strips in recent issues of Dark Horse Presents and his own series Apocalypse Nerd, and these will be collected in the one shot Founding Fathers Funnies. Bagge is all over the humor of the great people who founded our great nation, and i’m sure it goes beyond cherry trees, kites and wooden false teeth.

Did Watchmen Steal From The Outer Limits, Or From Jack Kirby?


[Warning: The following contains spoilers for Watchmen, The Outer Limits, and some old sci-fi you probably weren’t planning on reading.] At the end of Watchmen, a television set in the background announces a rerun of The Outer Limits episode “The Architects Of Fear.” This was a reference to a creative debate that occurred behind the scenes between writer […]

The strange history of the Fantastic Four movie franchise


This weekend’s new superhero movie is Fantastic Four, not to be confused with Fantastic Four or Fantastic Four Or even The Fantastic Four The 1978 cartoon version famously substituted a robot named H.E.R.B.I.E for the Human Torch. Although the reason given for years was that networkexecs children would set themselves alight during play, given everything […]