It’s true: women know how to read comics


About six months ago, I took a victory lap. And I’m gonna take another one. Because I was right, all along. Last’s week’s twin announcements of the revamped DC line-up and Marvel’s all-woman A-Force showed that even the big two have embraced the idea of a diverse readership as a sound business model. It was only four years ago, when the New 52 launched, that there was an outcry about only 1% of the creators being female, and DC co-publisher Dan DiDio got put on the spot and reacted with a less than conciliatory tone.

More on Milestone 2.0


Yesterday’s announcement of Milestone 2.0 was broken in the Washington Post, but principles Reggie Hudlin and Denys Cowan did more extensive interviews talking about what they have planned in a few places. Talking with Albert Ching at CBR they noted “We’re Not in the Nostalgia Business”, which is a pretty good platform to build from. While the details are still sketchy, they confirmed that they have some projects in the works with DC, among other publishers, although there was a long legal tangle to unravel.

Broken Frontier Awards 2014 winners: women, Image dominate


The comics news website Broken Frontier has announced the winners of its annual awards, as chosen by readers and industry professionals. Image Comics was a winner, as you might expect, but female creators won in 5 of the 13 categories, suggesting that the arrival of talented and noteworthy women in comics is a thing that is here and now and not some hoped for future event. The winners are as follows:

Gotham Greets the Justice League

Justice League NYC logo

On Friday New York City Mayor Bill deBlasio met with protestors to discuss their demands for police reform after the shocking death of Eric Garner and the controversial grand jury decision that followed. The name of the activists’ organization will sound familiar to any comics fan: Justice League NYC. That this prominent group of social […]

Reminder: Walt Disney was a sexist Jerk


Yeah yeah, Walt Disney was a genius and a trailblazer and a visionary…but he was also a racist and a horrible sexist. The letter informing a woman applying for a job at the studio informing her that “Women do not do any of the creative work in connection with preparing the cartoons for the screen, as that work is performed entirely by young men. For this reason girls are not considered for the training school.” has been floating around for years, but recently a newspaper story by Disney biographer Bob Thomas laying out his ideas of women’s capabilities has been unearthed and it’s even worse.

Video corner: Independent Sources covers Diversity in Comics at NYCC


Independent Sources is a local to NYC show that spotlights ethnic and local news. Hosted by Zyphus Lebrun, it’s put together by CUNY (City University of New York ) and runs on their cable station. Last week’s episode, covers various aspects of diversity in comics, with thoughtful interviews with Marvel’s Sana Amanat, Image’s David Brothers, Morgan Dubin from Abrams Comic Arts, Jonathan Gray, Assistant Professor of English, John Jay College, artist Dexter Vines and yours truly. Aside from my having to terrifyingly reënect walking into a comic shop, it’s a sprightly look at the basic issues of diversity and the widening audience for comics. There’s also a nice segment on a cosplayer who designed a Rita Repulsa costume and others for curvier women.

Reminder: Women play a lot of video games


In all the current hoo hah about video games, diversity and propaganda, it’s worth remembering that women make up nearly 50% of most kinds of gamers. There are some exceptions, of course. Unlike the comic industry, the video gaming industry has the money to study this sort of thing, and the Entertainment Software Association has put together many statistics on the age and gender of gamers. The most recent study shows that 48% of all gamers are women.

I was spit balling with Brett Schenker the other day, he of the groundbreaking Facebook study on comic demographics, and I wondered what his methodology would day about female games.

The Valkyries: secret warrior women of comics shops


There was a time not too long ago when you could fit all the “women in comics” at a big table in a coffee shop. Now there re more than 300 women who just work in comics shops. That’s the membership of The Valkyries, a private organization for female comics retail employees. and it turns out the group has been instrumental in promoting a coupld of books that have had great success this year, namely Saga and Lumberjanes. Janelle Asselin interviews group founder Kate Leth for all the details: