To Do: New-York Historical Society Exhibits Superheroes and a Line King!

Lincoln Douglas

While it has a prominent location on 77th Street facing Central Park West, the New-York Historical Society is one of the overlooked gems among New York City Museums. It might be because of that “natural history” museum up the street. Or maybe it’s because history isn’t that popular here in New York City. (Across the […]

How a toxic history of harassment has damaged the comics industry

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At the recently concluded Small Press Expo in Bethesda a very cool thing happened. A bunch of awards were presented to several talented, unique cartoonists who are turning out though provoking, beautifully crafted work, influential work. The winners were all popular and well deserved. And they all happened to be women. It was a thing, for sure, and much talked about. What struck me, first off, was just how strong the work was–Sophie Goldstein’s multi leveled future history of a world where having a baby became a rebellious act, Emily Carroll’s mastery of horror and structure, Eleanor Davis’s powerful examination of self-sabotaging quests for self-esteem in many settings.

The other thing that struck me was the contrast with the other conversations I was having at the show. Talking with people I used to work with in the “mainstream” comics industry about the long lists of men who would never have given Goldstein, Carroll or Davis a shot at telling their stories. Because they are women, and those people didn’t think women could make good comics.

Peter Bagge’s Founding Fathers Funnies coming from Dark Horse

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Peter Bagge is prolific and hilarious, a very good combination in a cartoonist. He’s been running short one page historical comic strips in recent issues of Dark Horse Presents and his own series Apocalypse Nerd, and these will be collected in the one shot Founding Fathers Funnies. Bagge is all over the humor of the great people who founded our great nation, and i’m sure it goes beyond cherry trees, kites and wooden false teeth.

The strange history of the Fantastic Four movie franchise

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This weekend’s new superhero movie is Fantastic Four, not to be confused with Fantastic Four or Fantastic Four Or even The Fantastic Four The 1978 cartoon version famously substituted a robot named H.E.R.B.I.E for the Human Torch. Although the reason given for years was that networkexecs children would set themselves alight during play, given everything […]

Unassuming Barber Shop: In Search of the Fantastic Four

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On April 12, 1961, Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gargarin became the first human being to achieve Earth orbit, effectively winning the space race. At NASA, scientists sighed, poured more coffee, and redoubled their efforts. In New York, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby created the Fantastic Four. With a new FF movie coming out, readers and fans […]

Dave Sim receives a $500,000 bequest to turn his house into a museum

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In his latest weekly video, Cerebus creator Dave Sim reveals that an anonymous donor has agreed to leave a bequest of $500,000 to The Cerebus Trust Fund. So it turns out someone really likes Cerebus! And Sim need no longer worry about money for getting his comic The Strange Death Of Alex Raymond published, and […]

90s nostalgia; The Anti-Gravity Room

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Just in case you missed my explanation of how manga helped pave the way for a more diverse comics industry, here’s a video of me and then-Marvel editor Bobbie Chase in 1996 trying to explain why women might want to read comics. It’s from a TV show called The Anti Gravity Room, which was shown on the SfiCi Channel as it was then known, which was a US version of Canada’s Prisoners of Gravity. Both shows covered the whole “comics, nerd world” with taped interviews and comics-friendly segments that seem commonplace now, but were unique at the time. I think I co-hosted an episode or two, and I can’t wait until those tapes surface.

11th Anniversary Special: Really Famous People Holding Comics Books, world politics division

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In honor of the Beat’s 11th anniversary ehre are two epic photos from recent social media. In the first, Congressman John Lewis presents signed copies of the March graphic novels to Malala Yousafzai, the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Malala was shot in the head in her native Pakistan for daring to want […]