Tonight @ Society of Illustrators: Is That Art?


This exhibit of works from Craig Yoe’s original art collection has already garnered stellar accolades – tonight you can see why. And that’s not all …


Weekend Watching: Rep. John Lewis and Jon Stewart talking graphic novels


Let’s end up this week in comics with an inspiring event: Rep. John Lewis’s full half appearance on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart on Monday. The occasion was the 50th anniversary of the march over the Edmund Pettus Bridge, and that by itself is inspiring enough. There was much discussion of the two March graphic […]


The Buddyback pose: A brief history of buddy cops posing back-to-back in front of a car


I was tooling around on the internet the other night, and unexpectedly came across this masterpiece, a monument to the 80s culture of buddy cop TV shows that features perhaps the most perfect execution of the “buddy cops standing back to back in front of a car with their arms crossed” pose, a pose parodied as much as it is worshipped worldwide. Sometimes the arms are not crossed sometimes they are holding guns, sometimes they are standing in front of other things. But it’s the “I got your back, buddy!” pose that says these partners are going to solve crimes together no matter what the dangers.


Unassuming Barber Shop: Age of Ultron, Vision, and Spock


The passing of Leonard Nimoy last week was, as Lance Parkin notes, “a significant event.” Trekkers Everyone mourned this actor, and this character, by watching Wrath of Khan, taking LLAP selfies, and retweeting Nimoy’s last public words. We took a moment. The character of Spock is an icon of American popular culture. But what about […]


Kickstarter alert: Comic Book People 2: Photographs from the 1990s by Jackie Estrada


Somehow I have neglected to mention until this moment that Jackie Estrada is crowdfunding a second book of photos taken at conventions over the years, this one focusing on the 90s. The first volume was a roaring success. This second one (Despite not having me on the cover) looks to be just as good. And […]


Devil’s Due explores the Armenian Genocide in OPERATION NEMESIS


Human history has a lot of dark moments….the Armenian genocide is one of them. Devil’s Due has been around for a long time, and had ups, downs and all arounds, but they have a very interesting project coming out in April called Operation Nemesis: A Story of Genocide & Revenge a graphic novel honoring the 100th anniversary of the […]


Hero History: The Paradoxical World of Harley Quinn


What makes Harley Quinn so popular? Abraham Riesman digs into her history to try to find answers.


The Power of Comics — Recharged


Randy Duncan and Matthew Smith have published a second edition of their essential textbook on the history and business of comics — and this time, they’re joined by a new author: Paul Levitz.


Michael Davis talks about why he’s not in Milestone 2.0


In the last few weeks there’s been a bit of online speculation about why Michael Davis, one of the original Milestone Comics founders, along with Denys Cowan, Derek Dingle and Dwayne McDuffie, and co-creator of Static Shock, is not involved with the new Milestone 2.0, which is being run by Cowan, Dingle and Reggie Hudlin. […]


Templesmith Does Lovecraft


by Pamela Auditore Anyone familiar with Spike TV Scream Award Winner and New York Times Bestselling Artist/Writer Ben Templesmith’s work knows he is profoundly influenced by HP Lovecraft. Even a cursorary glance at his art makes this apparent. Lovecraft’s influence is most directly on display in Templesmith’s most recent graphic novel Squidder.  A tale of […]


The OSU Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum acquires Tom Tomorrow’s paper


OSU’s Billy Ireland library and Museum continues to amass more important collections or archival papers with the announcement that editorial cartoonist Tom Tomorrow aka Dan Perkins will be donating his papers to the institution. Tomorrow is a alt.weekly mainstay whose made the transition to the inetrent world, with his trenchant comics found in 70 papers, Daily Kos, The Nation, and The Nib.  


Unassuming Barber Shop: Salvador Dali’s Sub-Mariner


In a previous post, we looked at how Carl Burgos’ original Human Torch might have been inspired by helldivers at the 1939 New York World’s Fair (Unassuming Barber Shop is all about that “might”). But you can’t talk about the Torch without his elemental counterpart: the Sub-Mariner. There are multiple accounts of how Bill Everett […]


Nate Powell and Chris Ross on How They Designed ‘March’


[Editor’s note: The release this week of March Book Two by Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell has already made headlines with its story of the fight for civil rights in the 60s, and the covers to both volumes have become iconic in their own right. The message of the courage to fight for equality for all in the face of violent opposition is as relevant and needed today as it was 50 years ago. But powerful images to cover powerful times don’t always spring up fully formed. Here Powell and Top Shelf designer Chris Ross with an in-depth breakdown of how they created these covers and combined imagery to capture both history and ideals.]

NATE: March was originally a single, massive volume, so the initial front and back covers were intended to house the entire narrative: the front introduced the basic visual theme of opposition, with two elements facing off against each other, though a contingent of riot-ready white supremacist police were prominently featured across the bottom. After some discussion with Chris Ross, Andrew Aydin, and Congressman Lewis, we all agreed that we should shift some of that focus to the folks on the front lines, and away from Jim Crow police forces. Around that time, we decided to release the saga as a trilogy, so Chris and I jumped in to further develop the oppositional themes, but playing with different angles and approaches to the cover’s division.


Today’s reading: The Montgomery Story starring Martin Luther King, Jr.


This educational comic from 1957 is credited with inspiring many to take on non violent protest as a means to achieving civil rights for all. Most famously, a young John Lewis read it and was inspired to march, a story told this week in March Part 2 by Lewis, Nate Powell and Alfred Aydin.

The comic, published by the Fellowship for Reconciliation, was written by pacifist Alfred Hassler and drawn by an unnamed artist in the Al Capp studio; it’s been translated other language and in 2011 used as a tool in Egyptian protests.


A stroll down memory lane: Dan DiDio’s personal history of The Crisis Era


Say what you will about Dan DiDio: in his time as DC’s first executive editor then co-publisher, he’s remade a lot of what made the company tick, starting with Identity Crisis, the controversial but best selling mini series that kicked off what we at Stately beat Manor call The Crisis Era. (Infinite Crisis and the misleadingly named Final Crisis would follow). As DC’s spring move to the west coast closes the cover on more than 75 years of comics history, DiDio is revisiting his own 13 years at DC on his FB page, as so many do as the new year starts and the cold wind howls outside…so step inside with us for some cocoa and Dan DiDio’s fireside chat:


Review: When Marvel Comics went Underground by Nicky Wheeler-Nicholson

The Best of Comix

The Best of Comix Book: When Marvel Went Underground, published by Dark Horse under the imprint of the Kitchen Sink Press from Denis Kitchen and John Lind is now available. It’s a who’s who of some of the top names in comics. The Introduction is written by none other than Stan Lee himself with a foreword by Denis Kitchen.

I had the opportunity to sit down with Denis Kitchen and John Lind in October at New York Comic Con to discuss the latest publishing efforts from Kitchen Sink Press. Denis Kitchen is considered to be the founding publisher of independent and underground comics. He was instrumental in publishing people like R. Crumb, Harvey Pekar, Howard Cruse and Trina Robbins to name a few.It’s especially prescient to look at the work that Denis and John are currently publishing in light of recent world events. The Best of Comix Book showcases some of the best of the underground comics that Denis published with Marvel under Stan Lee’s direction. This momentous occasion occurred during the period when Stan agreed to help Denis continue publishing while Denis was going through difficult financial times.