Françoise Mouly launches Blown Covers blog

On the “authority” scale, the idea of New Yorker cover editor Françoise Mouly launching a blog about New Yorker covers and art would rank….very high. And so Blown Covers, which she describes as a personal blog. Although it’s unafiliated with the New Yorker, she’s holding weekly themed New Yorker cover contests and is “always on the lookout for good ideas and great artists.” So yeah, this is an audition.

Must Read: Thoughts on the comics life

Unless you have been living under a rock, you’ve seen Tom Spurgeon’s essay on facing a life threatening illness, an illness which led to his unexpected blogging absence earlier this summer, and which still affects him, although he’s recovering. Since looking death in the face usually prompts some inventory of life, Spurgeon does just that in an astonishing essay that covers his life and his life in comics, if there is a difference. That a man fighting for his life should spend that time thinking about the Green Lantern movie is both ridiculous and awesome — Tom’s thoughts on why we chose the comics life and why we stay there speak for me about 80% of the time. It’s not that we have on choice, but rather why would we WANT to leave a field that is full of such honest, unpretentious work and creative, life-loving people?

The Comics Reporter has returned

Since going on a nearly month long hiatus from blogging, Tom Spurgeon has left indie comics readers in serious withdrawal from golden age comics reprints, indie comics art dumps, old photos of cartoonists doing things, and of course, insightful commentary. Luckily
as of today Tom is back to blogging today, with a San Diego preview, and a look at why it may have been time for the Xeric to go. Sadly, the elements that caused the hiatus have also prevented him from making the San Diego trip, but we’re sure that he’ll give better coverage from afar than most of us could do from the ground.

Jim Shooter blogs

“On a November day in 1957 I found myself standing in front of Miss Grosier’s first grade class in Hillcrest Elementary School in Bethel Park, Pennsylvania, trying to think of a really good word. She had us play this game in which each kid had to offer up a word to the class, and for every classmate who couldn’t spell your word, you got a point–provided, of course, that you could spell the word. Whoever got the most points received the coveted gold star.”