Alan Moore’s Secret Q&A Cult Exposed! Part IV: At Last the Truth Can Be Told!!!!!

The Bojeffries Saga - Buy It Now!

I had intended to post up the Q&A exchanges involved in this, a few at a time, over the summer months, but inevitably time got the better of me, so I’m posting all of the rest of them in one go, although that’s going to be one very long – 12,000 plus words – read. […]

Review: Baltic comics anthology S! #25 works its artful magic on Manga


This collection of gaijin mangaka — that is, Manga style comics made by non-Japanese creators — who graduated to the style of Gekiga — that is, serious dramatic Manga, as opposed to, say, Sailor Moon. It’s a heavy and obtuse collection, with many of the creators taking stylistic cues from the form, but infusing it […]

Review: Seitchik’s ‘Exits’ offers invisibility as the beginning of transformation


In Exits, Daryl Seitchik takes a fairly obvious, well-worn bit of symbolism and manages to make the readers’ familiarity with it into one of the work’s strengths. After a traumatic day Claire turns invisible, finding herself slipped into a phantom world, with her corporeal existence fading away, and what’s left of her consciousness, though unseen, […]

Review: Leela Corman connects the emotional and intellectual dots


  Leela Corman’s work is a lot of things in We All Wish For Deadly Force. Whether using vivid, thick colors or more simple black line work, or muddy comic chimeras made up of both and more, she’s able to create an emotional landscape that perfectly enhances the philosophical intellectualism and sincere autobiography of her […]

Review: Rabagliati’s ‘Paul’ books remain the most insightful comics about males ever


Michel Rabagliati‘s semi-autobiographical Paul character is one of the delights of modern comics, with each volume seamless in mixing sweet charm with a sadness that is often like a punch in the gut that you should expect, but always forget is coming. You’re too wrapped up in the sweet charm, and in the way Rabagliati, […]

Reviews: Three mini comics that deserve your attention today


Ley Lines: Made With Love In Hell by Mimi Chrzanowski From it’s dayglo pink cover, through all its cranberry-red rendered interior, this portrait of a visit to hell is definitely inspired by Hieronymus Bosch — the back cover confirms this, but it seemed apparent to me from page one — by way of the kawaii […]

Review: Aidan Koch and Paloma Dawkins look inward and far out


After Nothing Comes by Aidan Koch This collection from Koyama Press of Koch’s early mini comics speaks to what makes Koch stand out. With an art style that might even be called slight, often featuring faint lines that at times have an unfinished feel, others that feel as if they are fading from the page, […]

Review: Sean Karemaker’s autobio comics are intense and poetic


It’s not a visibly large book, about average looking at a glance, but Sean Karemaker’s The Ghosts We Know is more dense than most autobiographical comics you will encounter — dense with ideas, dense with psychology, dense with illustration that marks dimensions far beyond the one on its two-dimensional surface. Karemaker’s approach to autobiographical comics […]

Review: ‘Ohio Is For Sale’ – Hilarious Slacker Comedy or Sisyphean Nightmare?


Settling in on the lives of three slacker type funny animals, Trevor, Patrick and Leonard — I thought it was two dogs and a cat, but I saw someone online mention it was two cats and a dog, and maybe it is, but it probably doesn’t actually matter much — Jon Allen’s web comic Ohio […]