It’s Time To Rethink How Graphic Novels Are Read


The audience migration from monthly comics to graphic novels (tpbs, if you prefer) has always been a fairly contentious thing. There’s not a lot of point in denying that the book format is continuing to make gains and a lot of new readers prefer it. When Paul Levitz writes about graphic novels being “a clear majority of sales,” it’s probably time for a wider range of people give up the ghost and talk about that format as an end game.

Interview: Tales from the Loop’s Simon Stålenhag—Swedish Sci-Fi Inspiration and Why Alien is a Perfect Bedtime Story

Simon Stålenhag

Roaming around Austin during SXSW is a perfect way to stumble into discoveries. One such find this year was the Nordic Lighthouse—a showcase of Nordic startup tech, cinema, music, food, and design. Lucky for me Simon Stålenhag, the author of Tales From The Loop, was part of that showcase. I managed to get some time where he talked about inspiration, Swedish countryside, the eighties, why his dad’s bedtime story was Alien, and poetry.

Events: Singapore’s Sonny Liew Visits SF’s The Isotope and Many More

The Isotope - Sonny Liew

I’m flying out to cover Image Expo and Emerald City Comic Con in Seattle, but if I was sticking around San Francisco you’d be certain to see me at Sonny Liew’s book release tour stop at The Isotope. Sonny Liew’s The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye has already been declared “2016’s first superalitve graphic novel” by our own Kyle Pinion, great review from NPR’s Fresh Air, and it’s already part of the discussion for what is 2016’s first comics masterpiece. What’s happening and where else can you see him?

Review: Michael DeForge’s ‘Big Kids’ tells us something about ourselves


Millennials are often portrayed by the older generation – my own, to be clear – as a generation of victims. Like most cross-generational proclamations, this is a self-righteous pile of bull built from Gen Xers’ and Boomers’ stumbling reading of Millennial discourse, as well as some resentment for our own repression and the ability of […]

Review: New York Review of Books’ new comics line is off to an amazing start


It was a fantastic day for artful, intelligent comics when the New York Review of Books added comics to its publishing line. The focus so far is on making obscure graphic novels available again, and the March 22 release of Mark Beyer’s riotous Agony sets an interesting tone for the line. Beyer’s work, which is about the size […]

Review: Tommi Musturi shows that hope isn’t easy


Finnish cartoonist Tommi Musturi’s The Book Of Hope is as mysterious and elusive as the human being it examines. Set in a family cottage following retirement, Musturi settles into his narrator position calmly in order to scribe, without judgment or even much push for clarity, the experience of one man as he inhabits the time […]

Review: Julia Wertz’s thoughtful and healing style of self-deprecation


Julia Wertz’s Eisner-nominated Drinking At The Movies, originally from 2010 but here with a handsome reissue from Koyama Press, is renowned for its humorous self-deprecating pile-on. At its root is the suggestion that beating yourself up is probably just part of personal growth. And that’s not just meant to make you feel better, but an […]

Review: Nick Drnaso gives us 2016’s first great work with ‘Beverly’


Nick Drnaso’s fictional world is a particularly joyless one where even coming together doesn’t much help the human condition. It might even make things worse. As depicted in the Drnasoverse, each human has their own internal monologue that other humans are shut out from, and this creates distance, alienation, and confusion. Since one of us […]