Review: Brecht Evens and the complications of growing up

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Unfolding like a children’s book gone horribly wrong, Brecht Evens’ Panther begins with the death of Christine’s cat and the appearance what might be an imaginary friend designed to take its place and ease the sadness of the loss. Panther springs out of Christine’s bottom drawer and into her life with a sly charm that […]

Grant Morrison is excited to be writing two more Wonder Woman graphic novels

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Wonder Woman Earth One by Grant Morrison and Yanick Paquette has finally been published, after five or six years of behind the scenes delays. Reaction has been mixed, but the positive reviews have been strong, showing that Morrison may just have negotiated The Most Dangerous Job On Earth, namely writing Wonder Woman in a highly problematic atmosphere.

Review: Ludovic Debeurme’s Renee looks right into the abyss

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In 2006’s Lucille, French cartoonist Ludovic Debeurme gave a surreal and somber tone to a doomed love story, following the individual wrecked lives of anorexic Lucille and the emotionally troubled Arthur, and how they come together as a means of escape. Renee, his 2010 follow-up to that work, is a less of a linear book […]

Unflattening wins Lynd Ward Prize

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Nick Sousanis’s Unflattening, a theoritcal treatise on the use of visual storytelling, has won the 2016 Lynd Ward Prize for Graphic Novel of the Year. The award is presented annually by Penn State to honor an outstanding graphic novel. “‘Unflattening,’” the jury noted, “is an innovative, multi-layered graphic novel about comics, art and visual thinking. The […]

Review: Aama is intelligent, mind-bending science fiction with a core of humanity

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Taking the idea of awareness and screwing with it from multiple vantage points — self-awareness, awareness of the space around you, familial awareness, scientific awareness, societal awareness — Aama addresses, among other things, the notion of a hive mind and presents mankind as a damaged entity, one in which each part is out of sync […]

It’s Time To Rethink How Graphic Novels Are Read

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The audience migration from monthly comics to graphic novels (tpbs, if you prefer) has always been a fairly contentious thing. There’s not a lot of point in denying that the book format is continuing to make gains and a lot of new readers prefer it. When Paul Levitz writes about graphic novels being “a clear majority of sales,” it’s probably time for a wider range of people give up the ghost and talk about that format as an end game.

Interview: Tales from the Loop’s Simon Stålenhag—Swedish Sci-Fi Inspiration and Why Alien is a Perfect Bedtime Story

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Roaming around Austin during SXSW is a perfect way to stumble into discoveries. One such find this year was the Nordic Lighthouse—a showcase of Nordic startup tech, cinema, music, food, and design. Lucky for me Simon Stålenhag, the author of Tales From The Loop, was part of that showcase. I managed to get some time where he talked about inspiration, Swedish countryside, the eighties, why his dad’s bedtime story was Alien, and poetry.

Events: Singapore’s Sonny Liew Visits SF’s The Isotope and Many More

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I’m flying out to cover Image Expo and Emerald City Comic Con in Seattle, but if I was sticking around San Francisco you’d be certain to see me at Sonny Liew’s book release tour stop at The Isotope. Sonny Liew’s The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye has already been declared “2016’s first superalitve graphic novel” by our own Kyle Pinion, great review from NPR’s Fresh Air, and it’s already part of the discussion for what is 2016’s first comics masterpiece. What’s happening and where else can you see him?

Review: Michael DeForge’s ‘Big Kids’ tells us something about ourselves

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Millennials are often portrayed by the older generation – my own, to be clear – as a generation of victims. Like most cross-generational proclamations, this is a self-righteous pile of bull built from Gen Xers’ and Boomers’ stumbling reading of Millennial discourse, as well as some resentment for our own repression and the ability of […]

Review: New York Review of Books’ new comics line is off to an amazing start

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It was a fantastic day for artful, intelligent comics when the New York Review of Books added comics to its publishing line. The focus so far is on making obscure graphic novels available again, and the March 22 release of Mark Beyer’s riotous Agony sets an interesting tone for the line. Beyer’s work, which is about the size […]