The Strange Case of Grant Morrison and Alan Moore, As Told By Grant Morrison

Photo Used in Drivel Column

by Laura Sneddon–Over the last few weeks, my good friend Pádraig Ó Méalóid has been writing a series of articles about Alan Moore and Superfolks, which became an edgeways look at the long running friction between Moore and fellow writer, Grant Morrison. While Moore has previously spoken out about his thoughts on Morrison in various interviews, Morrison has generally kept quiet on the issue. There have been occasional barbs of course, and plenty of praise, but very little on the actual facts of the matter.

Good Work, Comics: Boy Bands and Shadow Edition


It’s getting tougher all the time, as Paul McCartney would’ve likely sung if the Beatles had reunited for a jaded comeback tour in the 1990s. All you want in life is for Stephanie Brown to get just one bit of respect, but time and time again your dreams are shatteringly recoloured at the last moment. And […]

Alan Moore and Superfolks Part 1: The Case for the Prosecution


In 1977 Dial Press of New York published Robert Mayer’s first novel, Superfolks. It was, amongst other things, a story of a middle-aged man coming to terms with his life, an enormous collection of 1970s pop-culture references, some now lost to the mists of time, and a satire on certain aspects of the comic superhero, but would probably be largely unheard of these days if it wasn’t for the fact that it is regularly mentioned for its supposed influence on a young Alan Moore and his work, particularly on Watchmen, Marvelman, and his Superman story, Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? There’s also a suggestion that it had an influence on his proposal to DC Comics for the unpublished cross-company ‘event,’ Twilight of the Superheroes. But who’s saying these things, what are they saying, and is any of it actually true?