Review: New York Review of Books’ new comics line is off to an amazing start


It was a fantastic day for artful, intelligent comics when the New York Review of Books added comics to its publishing line. The focus so far is on making obscure graphic novels available again, and the March 22 release of Mark Beyer’s riotous Agony sets an interesting tone for the line. Beyer’s work, which is about the size […]

Review: Roman Muradov’s ‘The End Of A Fence’ is cryptic, but beautiful


Immensely talented Russian illustrator Roman Muradov has quickly established himself as one of the most complex cartoonists around, both visually and narratively. In Muradov’s hands, the simplest fable can become a massively abstracted exercise that is usually part giddy, part confounding. If you’ve been alienated from his previous work because of this, The End Of […]

Review: ‘The Tipping Point’ unites science fiction themes with human psychology


Part of the celebration of 40 years of international publisher Humanoids, this anthology gathers some great talent to explore the idea of forks in the roads, those moments of life discovery that are like Schrodinger’s Cat for human emotion. As with any anthology, the results vary, but there’s a lot of good here, particularly considering these […]

Review: Tommi Musturi shows that hope isn’t easy


Finnish cartoonist Tommi Musturi’s The Book Of Hope is as mysterious and elusive as the human being it examines. Set in a family cottage following retirement, Musturi settles into his narrator position calmly in order to scribe, without judgment or even much push for clarity, the experience of one man as he inhabits the time […]

Review: Julia Wertz’s thoughtful and healing style of self-deprecation


Julia Wertz’s Eisner-nominated Drinking At The Movies, originally from 2010 but here with a handsome reissue from Koyama Press, is renowned for its humorous self-deprecating pile-on. At its root is the suggestion that beating yourself up is probably just part of personal growth. And that’s not just meant to make you feel better, but an […]

Review: Nick Drnaso gives us 2016’s first great work with ‘Beverly’


Nick Drnaso’s fictional world is a particularly joyless one where even coming together doesn’t much help the human condition. It might even make things worse. As depicted in the Drnasoverse, each human has their own internal monologue that other humans are shut out from, and this creates distance, alienation, and confusion. Since one of us […]

Daniel Clowes remembers Alvin Buenaventura


Two important links about the late Alvin Buenaventura, the esteemed art comix publisher. His great friends Daniel Clowes has a touching remembrance at The Comics Reporter: Alvin Buenaventura was the most important person in my life outside my immediate family. He was, to me, among many other things, an art representative, a production assistant, an […]

RIP Alvin Buenaventura


Over the weekend news of Alvin Buenaventura’s passing was confirmed. Buenaventura was 40 and as the publisher of first Buenaventura Press then Pigeon Press was one of the indie publishers who helped change the landscape of comics forever with his passion and devotion to detail, with such Cartoonists as Vanessa Davis, Lisa Hanawalt, Matt Furie and […]

Review: The Red Drip Of Courage distills Stephen Crane to a cartoon essence


You can go for years reading comics and come upon plenty of bizarre works, but at least understand where these are coming from. It’s more rare to hit on one that are more confounding, the ones that make you ask questions like “Where did this come from?” and “Who would do this?” So it is […]

Review: Two rich offerings in Nobrow’s 17 x 23 series


Nobrow Press’ 17 x 23 series highlights accomplished smaller works in a pleasing package that speaks to graphic novel consumers who might not seek out short comics stories. Two recent releases are particularly success in the way they take story forms of old and present them through a modern lens, making traditional lessons applicable to […]