Artist of the Day: Elias Ericson

Artist of the Day: Elias Ericsonhttp://ift.tt/1bh4nff

You’ve perhaps seen some of Elias Ericson’s comics and illustrations already as they have a tendency to pop up, uncredited, on many an internet comment thread. Thanks to the wonders of google image search I spent much of today engrossed in his work, which I highly recommend!

By Elias Ericson [link!]

By Elias Ericson [link!]

Self-described as a queer 19-year-old boy who draws a lot, Ericson does have one published book for Swedish readers, Åror, as well as appearing in a few indie anthologies. His tumblr, super queer artsy blog, and deviantArt though are mostly translated into English, and show off the artist’s various styles across comics, cartoons, sketches, illustrations, and paintings.

His comics, both long and short form which often focus on queer and trans issues, have become quite well known in various progressive circles, though Ericson has also had trouble with people editing the dialogue to suit their own agendas.

By Elias Ericson [link!]

By Elias Ericson [link!]

The above – very popular! – strip was edited to portray the left character as a girl gamer for example. Grr. Other great ones to check out are New Passengers, this one, Really Kind of Obvious, and this one.

Anyway, what really struck me about Ericson’s work was just how many different styles he uses, not just in design but in line art, colour palettes, shading techniques and comic layouts, so I really wanted to share his work. This link should show all his comics.

Black Clothes by Elias Ericson [link to entire comic!]

Black Clothes by Elias Ericson [link to entire comic!]

Quite a few of the comics and illustrations employ a rather fabulous touch of psychedelic surrealism, which also turns up in a few of the animations that he does as well – most spectacularly here and here [warning – flashing colours]. This animation is also used a little in his webcomic, Espaced. It’s a tad distracting, but the webcomic is well worth reading all the same.

By Elias Ericson [link!]

By Elias Ericson [link!]

Depression is also covered extensively, in a very genuine and honest way. These strips tend to be short and punchy, expressing the real pain of those with depression or other debilitating illnesses without necessarily having to cop to a happy ending. This strip and this strip are further examples.

By Elias Ericson [link!]

By Elias Ericson [link!]

And finally there are the stand alone illustrations, once more across an array of different styles, that are just aching to be prints or serve as the creative spark for another comic. The Kindest Punk on Earth and this fabulousness almost definitely belong on my wall, while Awake and this scene seem like perfect beginnings to a longer story.

By Elias Ericson [link!]

By Elias Ericson [link!]

In conclusion, I would love to see a collection of Elias Ericson’s comics and illustrations for an English (and Swedish!) audience. And he’s 19! Ridiculously talented :P

Laura Sneddon is a comics journalist and academic, writing for the mainstream UK press with a particular focus on women and feminism in comics. Currently working on a PhD, do not offend her chair leg of truth; it is wise and terrible. Her writing is indexed at comicbookgrrrl.com and procrastinated upon via @thalestral on Twitter.

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Kickwatcher alert: Bob Burden’s Thrilling Visions Sketchbook #2 is really weird

Bob Burden’s crazed yet wise comics and art are truly sui generis. The creator of The Flaming Carrot and The Mystery Men was way ahead of his time with the goofy superhero thing. And now he’s back to Kickstarter with THRILLING VISIONS 2 Sketchbook which covers Flaming Carrot’s early years, with a Dave Stevens cover. For the diehard 80s comics fans, one reward is a Teenage Mutant ninja Turtles/Cerebus/Flaming Carrot poster signed by Kevin Eastman, Dave Sim and Burden. It’s just like being there. And if you weren’t here are the 18 oddest, wildest, most disturbing drawings from the book.
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Gal Godot cast as Wonder Woman in Batman vs Superman

Gal Godot cast as Wonder Woman in Batman vs Supermanhttp://ift.tt/IHUGgb

Gal-Gadot.jpg

The Fast and the Furious’s Gal Godot has been cast as Wonder Woman in Batman Vs Superman.

Okay you can breathe now. After all the years of being tricky and problematic and spanking too many men, this is happening.

“Wonder Woman is arguably one of the most powerful female characters of all time and a fan favorite in the DC Universe. Not only is Gal an amazing actress, but she also has that magical quality that makes her perfect for the role. We look forward to audiences discovering Gal in the first feature film incarnation of this beloved character,” said director Zack Sndyer.

Godot, who had a background in modeling as well as acting, is 28 and was Miss Israel in the 2004 Miss Universe Pageant. She did spend two years in the Israeli Army however, as is mandatory for all Israeli citizens.

Putting Wonder Woman in BvS was a must-do for Warner Bros if they were to have any hope for launching their third iconic character. Given the amount of money that Disney makes on its girl-themed entertainment, launching a heroine for the girlie set could be a cash cow for the studio.

While not one to skinny-shame, I would have liked a fitter more athletic WW, a type Snyder has been comfortable with in the past. However, WB seems to like these tall skinny brunettes, so it’s all according to type.

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All New Marvel Now .Now books get free digital collections

All New Marvel Now .Now books get free digital collectionshttp://ift.tt/1eWody8

201312041242.jpg

We’ve lost track of just where Marvel is in their rolling reboot. We’ve had Marvel Now, All New Marvel Now and soon, no doubt, Marvel Now: Electric Bugaloo. There’s also All New Marvel Now .Now “Jumping on” issues. Hey anything to make it comprehensible. But anyway, the new All New Marvel Now rollout will include a bunch of free digital COLLECTIONS. That’s right. Marvel has been putting complimentary digital download codes with many books and single copies, but now you can get the entire collection of a books to catch up when you Jump On. Not the entire run, but the first collection of books, still a pretty sweet deal.

In other words, Marvel is making jumping on as easy as jumping off a log.

“The .NOW issues provide a great first issue entry point for new and existing readers alike,” said David Gabriel, SVP of Print & Digital Publishing, Marvel Entertainment in a statement. “But by offering free digital collections with print issues, we’re offering fans who may not have experienced these exciting series a great chance to jump into the full story all at once, taking advantage of both the print and digital formats in a manner no other publisher has attempted!”

 

Here are the titles with bonus digital collections:

 

·         Avengers #24.NOW – On-Sale 12/24/13

·         Savage Wolverine #14.NOW – On-Sale 1/08/14

·         All-New X-Men #22.NOW – On-Sale 1/22/14

·         Guardians of the Galaxy #11.NOW – On-Sale 1/29/14

·         Captain America #16.NOW – On-Sale 02/05/14

·         Thor: God of Thunder #19.NOW – On-Sale 02/12/14

·         Nova #13.NOW – On-Sale 02/19/14

·         Iron Man #23.NOW – On-Sale 03/19/14

·         Uncanny X-Men #19.NOW – On-Sale 03/19/14

·         Uncanny Avengers #18.NOW – On-Sale 3/26/14

Seems like a pretty good deal, and wed expect the secondary market to be pretty busy on these as well.

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Artist of the Day: Elias Ericson

You’ve perhaps seen some of Elias Ericson’s comics and illustrations already as they have a tendency to pop up, uncredited, on many an internet comment thread. Thanks to the wonders of google image search I spent much of today engrossed in his work, which I highly recommend!

By Elias Ericson [link!]

By Elias Ericson [link!]

[Read more…]

More tales of Kicktrolling emerge—and why it’s destructive

More tales of Kicktrolling emerge—and why it’s destructivehttp://ift.tt/1az2dEq

201312040251.jpg
art by Farel Dalrymple

Yesterday we wrote about “kicktrolling”, or Kickstarter backers bidding at high amounts only to then withdraw the bids as the campaign seemed near completion. It’s a practice that seems purely mischief driven, but it also seems it is becoming more widespread. Chris Stevens and Andrew Carl of Locust Moon Comics in Philadelphia posted on FB about a Kicktroller who hit their “Locust Man vs Monster” crowdfunder for a comics anthology. I’m piecing together the story from both their comments, but what happened is that someone pledged $2000 for their $600 campaign, which sent the campaign well over the goal—and set off warning bells. They reached out to the funder and Kickstarter to be certain but were told it was legit. However when it came time to collect, the funder disputed the amount. By then the money was already sitting in their Amazon account—where it remains, unable to be withdrawn.

There are a couple of real world consequences to this mischief or deliberate fraud or whatever it is. First off, Locust Moon still has to pay fees on the money since Amazon collected it “So as far as Kickstarter concerned, we received the money, and thus had to pay a percentage of it in fees. And for a small campaign like ours, that percentage of $2,000 wasn’t tiny,” Carl wrote.

In addition, because it looked like the campaign was well over goal, it was more difficult to get REAL backers.

Finally, because the campaign was funded at the stretch goals, they had to fulfill additional rewards—rewards which no one has paid for. “In our case, everyone whose money we actually received has or will have gotten what they were promised, stretch rewards included,” says Carl. “Even though the Kickstarter campaign itself didn’t actually raise the money we needed to pay for all of it. Our backers don’t need to suffer from this troll’s crap (that’s our job).”

According to Carl this same scammer has hit at least one other person’s campaign with a similar large amount and similar withdrawal. (We’ve reached out to hear that story as well.)

As we mentioned yesterday, with a lot of money changing hands via crowdfunding, it’s easy to see why people are messing with the structure for kicks or just to be total assholes. We’ve reached out to Kickstarter for comment as well.

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31 Days of Winter Festivals: Ugly Pop Culture Christmas Sweaters

31 Days of Winter Festivals: Ugly Pop Culture Christmas Sweatershttp://ift.tt/1dPKkZK

Is there such as thing as a “beautiful Christmas sweater?” Doubtful. Even Target makes no claims for their attractiveness. In compiling the following, it should be noted that many are in fact Christmas SWEATSHIRTS, which is cheating. To truly be an ugly Christmas SWEATER some knitting activity is required. But, as you can see, putting a Santa hat on beloved pop culture figures results in a sufficient level of horror.

15013270_201311251718.jpg

download.jpeg

download (1).jpeg

JEM063.1.jpg

0.jpg

…and here’s some general ugliness.

51T5Qj9DgUL._SX385_.jpg

31fIMq0SjzL.jpg

41uu+oeHAIL.jpg

cats.jpg

ugly-christmas-sweater.jpg

Have you ever worn a Christmas sweater? Were you embarrassed or empowered?

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Top shelf announces new books by Alan Moore and Liz Prince

Top shelf announces new books by Alan Moore and Liz Princehttp://ift.tt/1bgfNkn

Info on a couple of 2014 Top Shelf releases has been revealed.

BojeffriesThe Bojeffries Saga by Alan Moore and Steve Parkhouse is a comedy classic. I believe this collection has been in the works for a while (I have an older version of it sitting a few feet from where I’m typing) but an improved, definitive edition is welcome and a NEW story even more so. Alan Moore is a very funny guy, and not just for the way he rises to the bait any time someone brings up superheroes.

Alone foreverAlone Forever

I haven’t seen a book by Liz Prince in a while, but her breezy, chuckling comics on relationships are pretty easy to take.

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Gal Godot cast as Wonder Woman in Batman vs Superman

Gal-Gadot.jpg
The Fast and the Furious’s Gal Godot has been cast as Wonder Woman in Batman vs Superman.

Okay, you can breathe now. After all the years of being tricky and problematic and spanking too many men, this is happening.

“Wonder Woman is arguably one of the most powerful female characters of all time and a fan favorite in the DC Universe. Not only is Gal an amazing actress, but she also has that magical quality that makes her perfect for the role. We look forward to audiences discovering Gal in the first feature film incarnation of this beloved character,” said director Zack Snyder.

Godot, who had a background in modeling as well as acting, is 28 and was Miss Israel in the 2004 Miss Universe Pageant. She did spend two years in the Israeli Army, however, as is mandatory for all Israeli citizens.

Putting Wonder Woman in BvS was a must-do for Warner Bros if they were to have any hope for launching their third iconic character. Given the amount of money that Disney makes on its girl-themed entertainment, launching a heroine for the girlie set could be a cash cow for the studio.

While not one to skinny-shame, I would have liked a fitter, more athletic WW, a type Snyder has been comfortable with in the past. However, WB seems to like these tall, skinny brunettes, so it’s all according to type.

b041511b-0276_a_p.jpg

201312041318.jpg

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Kibbles ‘n’ Bits 12/04/13: Cartoonists start fighting and you won’t believe what happens next!

Kibbles ‘n’ Bits 12/04/13: Cartoonists start fighting and you won’t believe what happens next!http://ift.tt/1ayHr7N

Roiling tensions! Some sad, some silly.

§ In the sad territory, here’s news that 86-year-old Asteriz co-creator Albert Uderzo is suing his daughter and son-in-law. He claims they have used “psychological violence” in an attempt at “getting their hands” on his comics legacy. Uderzo cut the two loose as his managers in 2007, and its been strife ever since. Sylvie Uderzo claims other are taking advantage of the elder Uderzo, while Uderzo says “The sole purpose of these acts is to undermine our psychological integrity and to hasten our debility, in order to get their hands on our legacy, which they covet.” Sad sad sad.

§ FIIIIGHT. A few weeks ago pugnacious political cartoonist Ted Rall began running his cartoons on The Daily Kos, a very liberal news website. However, he says he was told by the site that his ape-like depiction of President Obama was “intolerable.” (Rall has been critical of Obama in the past for not being progressive enough.) Rall expanded on his thoughts in an interview at The Daily Wrap

“My Obama has only been seen in several thousand comic strips in hundreds of newspapers, so I guess the two thousandth is the charm,” Rall joked. “They’ve unmasked my careful campaign of racism.” Rall objected to what he termed a “seventh grade history lesson” on racism inherent in Daily Kos’ message and said he felt that the site was suffering from political correctness run amok. “It’s not a left thing,” Rall said. “It’s a squishy liberal thing and it’s not an accusation that should be tossed around lightly. It can really tarnish you and it’s fucking unfair.”



Rall’s long time friend Ruben Bolling stepped in and pointed out that Rall draws pretty much everyone the same way. It’s a powerful argument because Rall, by his own admission, has a cartooning style that is quite…basic.

6a00d8341c5f3053ef019b01dcb2ef970b 800wi

Things got more heated when Noah Berlatsky wrote for the Atlantic on the matter, and then Rall called for Berlatsky to be fired. See more of the slugfest in the comments at The Atlantic, if you have absolutely nothing else to do with your life.

§ On the silly side, cartoonist Donna Barstow has been trying to get Google to scrub negative commentson her work, and some people find this more risible than Barstow’s comics.

§ Kathleen David has the only statement about Ed Kramer she will make, but it’s a fascinating one:

I have been to DragonCon since about the third one I think. I have been the tech director of DragonCon back in the 90s. I still go to Dragon Con. I have lots of friends involved in Dragon Con. I have known Pat Henry for just about as long as I have known Ed. So Dragon Con is close and dear to my heart. When I heard that Ed was accused of child molestation, I had a hard time believing it. I knew Ed. I couldn’t see it. But that is the way of sociopaths that they can make themselves look innocent and normal in the eyes of everyone else. But as the years went on and various things came out, I came to the conclusion that I was as bamboozled as everyone else who thought that they knew him. The more he fought going to trial, the more I realized what I though I knew about him was false.

§ Esteemed novelist Jonathan Lethem (The Fortress of Solitude, Dissident Gardens, Omega the unknown) has (written a book about the Roddy Piper film THEY LIVE! . If you want to know what to get me for Christmas, there you go.

§ The Irish comics scene is viewed throughthe career of Will Sliney

§ With his stint on Firestorm long in the rearview mirror, wrier Joe Harris reveals The Lost Firestorm “Year Two” Story Notes with an impressive flow chart.

§ Rigorous comics critic Domingos Isabelinho is blogging again, and here’s an appreciation of Al Columbia’s Pim & Francie, a book which should always be appreciated.

§ Alan David Doane has also revived his blogging efforts.

Elektra vs Ninjas 4966b§ In a tweet, Tim Callahan revealed he would be dropping his column for When Worlds Collide, hopefully to keep on with his own blogging. The column will end at the year’s end. In the meantime, here’s apprecation of Frank Miller and Lynn Varley’s little remembered Elektra Lives Again:

So why doesn’t Miller talk about it much at all, and why is it not placed higher in the Miller pantheon by readers? Possibly because of the story, which is a melancholy tone poem of loss and suffering, and probably because Miller doesn’t want to talk about Elektra anymore and so he doesn’t. That’s just a guess, but there’s certainly something important in the betrayal Miller must have felt when he was promised that Elektra wouldn’t be used in the Marvel universe except when Miller was ready to return to the character, and then the news that Marvel was going to use Elektra regardless of what some of the editors may have promised in previous years. “Elektra Lives Again,” possibly meant as a cathartic epilogue for a character Miller birthed into the world instead became a tombstone in a neighborhood tainted with memories of broken promises and fractured relationships.



Is IS a very pretty book.

§ The Annie Awards noms are up, and Cartoon Brew has some commentary:

The Winsor McCay Award for lifetime achievement will be presented to Katsuhiro Otomo, Steven Spielberg and Phil Tippett. The celebrification of that award over the last decade has unfortunately distorted the meaning of lifetime achievement. Many of the well known names who receive it nowadays are still mid-career, or in the case of Spielberg, aren’t even involved in the day-to-day production of animation. Meanwhile, animation legends who are truly deserving of the lifetime achievement honor are consistently ignored. It’s hard to take any award seriously that honors Spielberg for his animation work, yet overlooks Don Lusk, who was an animator on nearly all the classic Disney features, worked in animation for 60 years, and just turned 100.

§ USA Today blogger Whitney Matheson has some thoughts on PictureBox shutting down:

While it may seem like we’re in a comics renaissance right now with comic-book-fueled stories gracing the big and small screens and graphic novels on bestseller lists, it’s important to remember that many independent publishers are still struggling. PictureBox will be missed for its creative content and daring spirit, which only increased my love of the medium.



I think that’s a good way to look at it. And it’s important to remember that Dan Nadel shut down PictureBox for his own personal reasons, not becuase it was in dire financial straits. I see comics folk struggling on every level in many ways, but it hasn’t slowed down the Golden Age.

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All New Marvel Now .Now books get free digital collections

201312041242.jpg
We’ve lost track of just where Marvel is in their rolling reboot. We’ve had Marvel Now, All New Marvel Now and soon, no doubt, Marvel Now: Electric Bugaloo. There’s also All New Marvel Now .Now “Jumping on” issues. Hey anything to make it comprehensible. But anyway, the new All New Marvel Now rollout will include a bunch of free digital COLLECTIONS. That’s right. Marvel has been putting complimentary digital download codes with many books and single copies, but now you can get the entire first collection of a book to catch up when you Jump On. Not the entire run, but the first collection of books, still a pretty sweet deal.

In other words, Marvel is making jumping on as easy as jumping off a log.

“The .NOW issues provide a great first issue entry point for new and existing readers alike,” said David Gabriel, SVP of Print & Digital Publishing, Marvel Entertainment in a statement. “But by offering free digital collections with print issues, we’re offering fans who may not have experienced these exciting series a great chance to jump into the full story all at once, taking advantage of both the print and digital formats in a manner no other publisher has attempted!”
 
Here are the titles with bonus digital collections:
 
·         Avengers #24.NOW – On-Sale 12/24/13
·         Savage Wolverine #14.NOW – On-Sale 1/08/14
·         All-New X-Men #22.NOW – On-Sale 1/22/14
·         Guardians of the Galaxy #11.NOW – On-Sale 1/29/14
·         Captain America #16.NOW – On-Sale 02/05/14
·         Thor: God of Thunder #19.NOW – On-Sale 02/12/14
·         Nova #13.NOW – On-Sale 02/19/14
·         Iron Man #23.NOW – On-Sale 03/19/14
·         Uncanny X-Men #19.NOW – On-Sale 03/19/14
·         Uncanny Avengers #18.NOW – On-Sale 3/26/14

Seems like a pretty good deal, and wed expect the secondary market to be pretty busy on these as well.

More tales of Kicktrolling emerge—and why it’s destructive

201312040251.jpg
art by Farel Dalrymple

Yesterday we wrote about “kicktrolling”, or Kickstarter backers bidding at high amounts only to then withdraw the bids as the campaign seemed near completion. It’s a practice that seems purely mischief driven, but it also seems it is becoming more widespread. Chris Stevens and Andrew Carl of Locust Moon Comics in Philadelphia posted on FB about a Kicktroller who hit their “Locust Man vs Monster” crowdfunder for a comics anthology. I’m piecing together the story from both their comments, but what happened is that someone pledged $2000 for their $600 campaign, which sent the campaign well over the goal—and set off warning bells. They reached out to the funder and Kickstarter to be certain but were told it was legit. However when it came time to collect, the funder disputed the amount. By then the money was already sitting in their Amazon account—where it remains, unable to be withdrawn.

There are a couple of real world consequences to this mischief or deliberate fraud or whatever it is. First off, Locust Moon still has to pay fees on the money since Amazon collected it “So as far as Kickstarter concerned, we received the money, and thus had to pay a percentage of it in fees. And for a small campaign like ours, that percentage of $2,000 wasn’t tiny,” Carl wrote.

In addition, because it looked like the campaign was well over goal, it was more difficult to get REAL backers.

Finally, because the campaign was funded at the stretch goals, they had to fulfill additional rewards—rewards which no one has paid for. “In our case, everyone whose money we actually received has or will have gotten what they were promised, stretch rewards included,” says Carl. “Even though the Kickstarter campaign itself didn’t actually raise the money we needed to pay for all of it. Our backers don’t need to suffer from this troll’s crap (that’s our job).”

According to Carl this same scammer has hit at least one other person’s campaign with a similar large amount and similar withdrawal. (We’ve reached out to hear that story as well.)

As we mentioned yesterday, with a lot of money changing hands via crowdfunding, it’s easy to see why people are messing with the structure for kicks or just to be total assholes. We’ve reached out to Kickstarter for comment as well.

31 Days of Winter Festivals: Ugly Pop Culture Christmas Sweaters

Is there such as thing as a “beautiful Christmas sweater?” Doubtful. Even Target makes no claims for their attractiveness. In compiling the following, it should be noted that many are in fact Christmas SWEATSHIRTS, which is cheating. To truly be an ugly Christmas SWEATER some knitting activity is required. But, as you can see, putting a Santa hat on beloved pop culture figures results in a sufficient level of horror.

15013270_201311251718.jpg

download.jpeg

download (1).jpeg

JEM063.1.jpg

0.jpg

…and here’s some general ugliness.

51T5Qj9DgUL._SX385_.jpg

31fIMq0SjzL.jpg

41uu+oeHAIL.jpg

cats.jpg

ugly-christmas-sweater.jpg

Have you ever worn a Christmas sweater? Were you embarrassed or empowered?

Top Shelf announces new books by Alan Moore and Liz Prince

Info on a couple of 2014 Top Shelf releases has been revealed.

BojeffriesThe Bojeffries Saga by Alan Moore and Steve Parkhouse is a comedy classic. I believe this collection has been in the works for a while (I have an older version of it sitting a few feet from where I’m typing) but an improved, definitive edition is welcome and a NEW story even more so. Alan Moore is a very funny guy, and not just for the way he rises to the bait any time someone brings up superheroes.

Alone foreverAlone Forever

I haven’t seen a book by Liz Prince in a while, but her breezy, chuckling comics on relationships are pretty easy to take.

Kibbles ‘n’ Bits, 12/04/13: Cartoonists start fighting and you won’t believe what happens next!

Roiling tensions! Some sad, some silly.

§ In the sad territory, here’s news that 86-year-old Asterix co-creator Albert Uderzo is suing his daughter and son-in-law. He claims they have used “psychological violence” in an attempt at “getting their hands” on his comics legacy. Uderzo cut the two loose as his managers in 2007, and its been strife ever since. Sylvie Uderzo claims others are taking advantage of the elder Uderzo, while Uderzo says “The sole purpose of these acts is to undermine our psychological integrity and to hasten our debility, in order to get their hands on our legacy, which they covet.” Sad sad sad.

§ FIIIIGHT. A few weeks ago pugnacious political cartoonist Ted Rall began running his cartoons on The Daily Kos, a very liberal news website. However, he says he was told by the site that his ape-like depiction of President Obama was “intolerable.” (Rall has been critical of Obama in the past for not being progressive enough.) Rall expanded on his thoughts in an interview at The Daily Wrap:

“My Obama has only been seen in several thousand comic strips in hundreds of newspapers, so I guess the two thousandth is the charm,” Rall joked. “They’ve unmasked my careful campaign of racism.” Rall objected to what he termed a “seventh grade history lesson” on racism inherent in Daily Kos’ message and said he felt that the site was suffering from political correctness run amok. “It’s not a left thing,” Rall said. “It’s a squishy liberal thing and it’s not an accusation that should be tossed around lightly. It can really tarnish you and it’s fucking unfair.”


Rall’s long-time friend Ruben Bolling stepped in and pointed out that Rall draws pretty much everyone the same way. It’s a powerful argument because Rall, by his own admission, has a cartooning style that is quite…basic.

6a00d8341c5f3053ef019b01dcb2ef970b 800wi
Things got more heated when Noah Berlatsky wrote for the Atlantic on the matter, and then Rall called for Berlatsky to be fired. See more of the slugfest in the comments at the Atlantic, if you have absolutely nothing else to do with your life.

§ On the silly side, cartoonist Donna Barstow has been trying to get Google to scrub negative comments on her work, and some people find this more risible than Barstow’s comics.

§ Kathleen David has the only statement about Ed Kramer she will make, but it’s a fascinating one:

I have been to DragonCon since about the third one I think. I have been the tech director of DragonCon back in the 90s. I still go to Dragon Con. I have lots of friends involved in Dragon Con. I have known Pat Henry for just about as long as I have known Ed. So Dragon Con is close and dear to my heart. When I heard that Ed was accused of child molestation, I had a hard time believing it. I knew Ed. I couldn’t see it. But that is the way of sociopaths that they can make themselves look innocent and normal in the eyes of everyone else. But as the years went on and various things came out, I came to the conclusion that I was as bamboozled as everyone else who thought that they knew him. The more he fought going to trial, the more I realized what I though I knew about him was false.

§ Esteemed novelist Jonathan Lethem (The Fortress of Solitude, Dissident Gardens, Omega the Unknown) has (written a book about the Roddy Piper film THEY LIVE! If you want to know what to get me for Christmas, there you go.

§ The Irish comics scene is viewed throughthe career of Will Sliney.

§ With his stint on Firestorm long in the rearview mirror, wrier Joe Harris reveals The Lost Firestorm “Year Two” Story Notes with an impressive flow chart.

§ Rigorous comics critic Domingos Isabelinho is blogging again, and here’s an appreciation of Al Columbia’s Pim & Francie, a book which should always be appreciated.

§ Alan David Doane has also revived his blogging efforts.

Elektra vs Ninjas 4966b§ In a tweet, Tim Callahan revealed he would be dropping his column When Worlds Collide, hopefully to keep on with his own blogging. The column will end at the year’s end. In the meantime, here’s appreciation of Frank Miller and Lynn Varley’s little remembered Elektra Lives Again:

So why doesn’t Miller talk about it much at all, and why is it not placed higher in the Miller pantheon by readers? Possibly because of the story, which is a melancholy tone poem of loss and suffering, and probably because Miller doesn’t want to talk about Elektra anymore and so he doesn’t. That’s just a guess, but there’s certainly something important in the betrayal Miller must have felt when he was promised that Elektra wouldn’t be used in the Marvel universe except when Miller was ready to return to the character, and then the news that Marvel was going to use Elektra regardless of what some of the editors may have promised in previous years. “Elektra Lives Again,” possibly meant as a cathartic epilogue for a character Miller birthed into the world instead became a tombstone in a neighborhood tainted with memories of broken promises and fractured relationships.


It IS a very pretty book.

§ The Annie Awards noms are up, and Cartoon Brew has some commentary:

The Winsor McCay Award for lifetime achievement will be presented to Katsuhiro Otomo, Steven Spielberg and Phil Tippett. The celebrification of that award over the last decade has unfortunately distorted the meaning of lifetime achievement. Many of the well known names who receive it nowadays are still mid-career, or in the case of Spielberg, aren’t even involved in the day-to-day production of animation. Meanwhile, animation legends who are truly deserving of the lifetime achievement honor are consistently ignored. It’s hard to take any award seriously that honors Spielberg for his animation work, yet overlooks Don Lusk, who was an animator on nearly all the classic Disney features, worked in animation for 60 years, and just turned 100.

§ USA Today blogger Whitney Matheson has some thoughts on PictureBox shutting down:

While it may seem like we’re in a comics renaissance right now with comic-book-fueled stories gracing the big and small screens and graphic novels on bestseller lists, it’s important to remember that many independent publishers are still struggling. PictureBox will be missed for its creative content and daring spirit, which only increased my love of the medium.


I think that’s a good way to look at it. And it’s important to remember that Dan Nadel shut down PictureBox for his own personal reasons, not because it was in dire financial straits. I see comics folk struggling on every level in many ways, but it hasn’t slowed down the Golden Age.

Webcomic alert: Maralinga 1956 by Jen Breach and Douglas Holgate

Webcomic alert: Maralinga 1956 by Jen Breach and Douglas Holgatehttp://ift.tt/1ckmv9o

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Jen Breach and Douglas Holgate are Australian creators who have been working on a huge graphic novel called Clem Heatherington and the Ironwood Race for many years. To take a break from this long project, they started ANOTHER huge project, a webcomic called,Maralinga 1956. Here’s the pitch:


Maralinga spins an alternative history from the 1956 British nuclear tests in the Woomera. Three hundred years later a ruined, irradiated, post-apocalyptic Australia is a place where monsters a real and one girl, the last of a isolated and dying community in Melbourne’s south, launches on a desperate journey to find sanctuary and a mythical inland sea.



Only the first chapter is up but it looks GREAT, with strong character designs rock solid storytelling and a new world to be discovered. Where do all these talented comcis creatros come from, anyway?

Via Dustin Harbin

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